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  1. #11
    AgX
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    I am confused. I just learned that there had been "Ektar" lenses on Retinas anyway.
    Part of them rebranded versions of Schneider lenses I know.
    Part of them Kodak made lenses. I do not know of Kodak manufacturing complex lenses in Germany. Thus Kodak imported their german bodies into the US and fitted them there with their own Ektar lenses?
    Last edited by AgX; 03-19-2014 at 08:01 AM. Click to view previous post history.

  2. #12
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    Quote Originally Posted by Ian Grant View Post
    The Ektar was used on some of the Bantam cameras, they use 828 which is un-perforated 35mm roll film later repackaged as 126.
    Yep. I forgot earlier that my Bantam has an Ektar.
    I do use a digital device in my photographic pursuits when necessary.
    When someone rags on me for using film, I use a middle digit, upraised.

  3. #13
    Ian Grant's Avatar
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    There's no common feature/design to Ektars, any of Kodaks Anastigmats were rebranded as Ektar when coating was introduced, although there were some uncoated Ektars before that. They were made by various companies including Kodak themselves.

    Ian

  4. #14

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    They also had a number of large format lenses named 'Ektar' and the famed SAV Carousel slide projectors all used Ektar lenses

  5. #15

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    Quote Originally Posted by Tom1956 View Post
    All my enlarging lenses are Ektars, probably of the Tessar-type design. I'm happy.
    Not necessarily. The 50/4.5 and 75/4.5 Enlarging Ektars are heliar types, the 100/4.5 is a dialyte. See http://www.bnphoto.org/bnphoto/KodakEktarsDB6-Enlg.htm

  6. #16

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    Quote Originally Posted by AgX View Post
    I do not know of Kodak manufacturing complex lenses in Germany. Thus Kodak imported their german bodies into the US and fitted them there with their own Ektar lenses?
    Kodak owned Nagel. Nagel made, among other cameras, Kodak Retinas. Most of the Ektars fitted to Retinas were rebadged Xenars, but some type 011 Retina IIs were fitted with a 47/2 Ektar (6/4 double Gauss type, I think) made in Rochester. All cameras were assembled in Stuttgart.

  7. #17

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    Quote Originally Posted by chip j View Post
    Ctein {"Post-Exposure" book} rated the Computar DL 55mm 1.9 as the best enlarging lens ever(35mm format}.
    I didn't remember that comment, so I checked and couldn't find it. Ctein recommended the 105/5.6 Apo El Nikkor above all other lenses for enlarging 35 mm.

  8. #18
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    Quote Originally Posted by Dan Fromm View Post
    Kodak owned Nagel. Nagel made, among other cameras, Kodak Retinas. Most of the Ektars fitted to Retinas were rebadged Xenars, but some type 011 Retina IIs were fitted with a 47/2 Ektar (6/4 double Gauss type, I think) made in Rochester. All cameras were assembled in Stuttgart.
    It's interesting that while Nagel was independent they didn't use Zeiss lenses instead using Schneider, presumably there was bad blood between Nagel and Zeiss. This seems to have boosted Schneider's importance as a leading lens manufacturer. Once Kodak took over Nagel the cameras began using Zeiss lenses as well.

    Ian

  9. #19

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    The medium format Ektars weren't the same design. The one on the Medalist I and II are five elements, while the Ektar on the Chevron is a four-element Tessar type. The Ektar was just a brand name and didn't represent a specific lens design, such as a Sonnar, Planar, Tessar, etc.

    Kodak used a variation of that name, producing lots of cameras with Ektanar lenses.

  10. #20

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    There are Kodak (Nagel) cameras with Zeiss lenses. I have a Vollenda Type 48 (VP 127) with a Tessar and a Vollenda 620 (6x4.5 and 6x9) also with Tessars. However, these are Kodak AG products and not the ones that are pre-Kodak, and I think Ian is right that pre-Kodak Nagels did not carry Zeiss lenses.

    I believe the story is that August Nagel was a former Zeiss employee who left and formed his own company after a disagreement with Zeiss. I can't recall what the disagreement was, but I recall reading that the split was acrimonious. I have to do some digging to find the article.

    The Retina Type 126 (the fourth Retina model) was the first to offer an array of lens options, including a Tessar, a Xenar, an Alcor, a Ysar and an Angineux, in addition to the Ektar for U.S. markets. My little Petersen's Retina guide says all prewar Kodak Ektar lenses (for the Retina) were manufactured by Schneider-Kreuznach.
    Last edited by elekm; 03-19-2014 at 11:00 AM. Click to view previous post history.

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