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  1. #91
    benjiboy's Avatar
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    I've had an EF for a long time and I know that, I used to sell them at a pro. dealers but couldn't afford to buy one because I had a young family at the time. Canon used to advertise the EF as "being particularly suitable for old people" and ironically I had to wait until I was old to get one.
    Ben

  2. #92
    AgX
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    Quote Originally Posted by thundertwin72 View Post
    I thought the metal shutters are vertical travel ... is it possible to have horizontal travel?
    In 35mm cameras curtain-shutters run horizontally, whether they are from cloth ot metal foil. Blade-shutters run vertically.

  3. #93

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    Quote Originally Posted by thundertwin72 View Post
    I think both are right:

    Canon Pellix = Metal shutter curtains.

    Canon Pellix QL = Cloth shutter curtains.......
    Well, I guess the Canon Museum is full of inaccuracies too. I have a black Canon Pellix QL and a chrome Pellix (non-QL). Both use metal curtains. They used metal shutter curtains for the same reason they used metal shutter curtains in later Canon rangefinders, to eliminate the risk of pinholes. Since the pellicle mirror allows light to pass through it to the film as well as up through the viewfinder, if you point the lens toward the sun (not uncommon), you would burn a hole in the curtain if it was cloth. The only question now is if they used stainless steel or titanium as the curtain material. I always thought it was stainless steel. Now I’m not so sure.

    Jim B.

  4. #94
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    Quote Originally Posted by AgX View Post
    In 35mm cameras curtain-shutters run horizontally, whether they are from cloth ot metal foil. Blade-shutters run vertically.
    This is what It was my understanding. I did question because of this:

    Canon Camera Museum, Canon Pellix, Specifications:

    "Shutter: Two-axis, horizontal-travel focal-plane shutter with metal curtains. X, (T), 1, 1/2, 1/4, 1/8, 1/15, 1/30, 1/60, 1/125, 1/250, 1/500, and 1/1000 sec. Self-timer lever also functions as the stop-down lever for metering".

    Quote Originally Posted by Mackinaw View Post
    Well, I guess the Canon Museum is full of inaccuracies too.
    It appears that it is.

    Quote Originally Posted by Mackinaw View Post
    They used metal shutter curtains for the same reason they used metal shutter curtains in later Canon rangefinders, to eliminate the risk of pinholes. Since the pellicle mirror allows light to pass through it to the film as well as up through the viewfinder, if you point the lens toward the sun (not uncommon), you would burn a hole in the curtain if it was cloth.
    A most logical argument, thanks for exposing.

  5. #95

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    Platinum shutter? Is there a reliable source for that?
    Last edited by miha; 03-30-2014 at 04:34 AM. Click to view previous post history.

  6. #96
    AgX
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    thundertwin72:

    As I said: In 35mm cameras curtain-shutters run horizontally, whether they are from cloth ot metal foil. Blade-shutters run vertically.

    This is not contrary to that Canon statement, Two-axis, horizontal-travel focal-plane shutter with metal curtains.

    Most probably you mixed up curtains with blades. Instead of blades one could also say slat.

  7. #97
    benjiboy's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by AgX View Post
    In 35mm cameras curtain-shutters run horizontally, whether they are from cloth ot metal foil. Blade-shutters run vertically.
    True, the Canon F1 and Nikon F2 have Titanium shutters that run horizontally.
    Ben

  8. #98

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    "... the [Canon EF's] vertical running Copal Square shutter is made out of pure Platinum ..."

    Well, if it is, it must be made from a very rare isotope of platinum that's magnetic. Also, the Pellix and Pellix QL have shutter curtains made from rubberized stainless steel similar to those used in Canon rangefinders. Canon never used cloth curtains in either Pellix.

  9. #99
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    Going back to the question of the AE-1 Program base plate is definitely injection molded plastic with out drilling or anything else, you can see mold marks and knock pin marks are quite obvious.Stamped brass is smooth inside.,not this thing.
    I'm going to acquire a AE-1 and a A-1.
    and check them too.
    APUG: F, F/FTN,F2,F2A,F2AS,F3,F3HP,FA,FE,FM,FM2,FE2,XK,XM,XD, XD-5,XD-7,XD-11,XE,XE-5,XE-7,SRT101,SRT102,XG9,XG7,XG1,XG-SE,XG-M,X700,OM-1,OM-1n,OM-2,OM-2n,OM-4,F-1,F-1N,AE-1P,R5,500C/M,SCII
    DPUG:D100,D200,D300

  10. #100
    AgX
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    Very strange indeed. As said my AE-1's definitely got stamped brass bottom plates.

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