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  1. #51

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    Just drill a hole in your camera base and top, then you'll know what it was made of.
    "If its not broken, I can't afford it."

  2. #52
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    Quote Originally Posted by trythis View Post
    Just drill a hole in your camera base and top, then you'll know what it was made of.
    You have the perfect avatar name for this suggestion!
    My blog / photo website: http://frankfoto.jimdo.com/

  3. #53
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    Quote Originally Posted by AgX View Post
    What does "apron" mean?
    What camera manual you got?

    Maybe I got the "Blue Mauritius" AE-1s, the only known samples with brass bottom. Any offers?

    Its a Canon factory service manual.


    trythis

    Just drill a hole in your camera base and top, then you'll know what it was made of.
    I'm going to get the cheapest AE-1, AE-1 Program and A-1 bodies I can find and check them out.You don't have to drill a hole, Just pull the plate off and tap it with metal object, screw driver etc. Dents vs cracks are a dead give away.I know the top is plastic its just a matter of checking the base plate.
    APUG: F, F/FTN,F2,F2A,F2AS,F3,F3HP,FA,FE,FM,FM2,FE2,XK,XM,XD, XD-5,XD-7,XD-11,XE,XE-5,XE-7,SRT101,SRT102,XG9,XG7,XG1,XG-SE,XG-M,X700,OM-1,OM-1n,OM-2,OM-2n,OM-4,F-1,F-1N,AE-1P,R5,500C/M,SCII
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  4. #54

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    Quote Originally Posted by fstop View Post

    I'm going to get the cheapest AE-1, AE-1 Program and A-1 bodies I can find and check them out.You don't have to drill a hole, Just pull the plate off and tap it with metal object, screw driver etc. Dents vs cracks are a dead give away.I know the top is plastic its just a matter of checking the base plate.
    That's not the point. Saws, drill bits and rasps are better at telling you what your camera is made of and knowing that will make you a better photographer. You can always fill the holes made by drill bits with bondo, cover them with tape or better yet, put a screw in the hole so the next person repairing it is confused. Saws and rasps require the bondo and paint method for resale for sure, so I recommend a drill bit.
    "If its not broken, I can't afford it."

  5. #55

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    Why does it matter if the body is plastic or metal?

  6. #56
    AgX
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    Exactly. That sturdiness of the body is just one part of the story. If one grain of sand can make a camera practically useless (as I experienced with just an AE-1) there are other issues related to environmental impact that should be thought about.

    Furthermore, plastic is a very general term, and the design of a cover part is influence too. A part that is thick, fibre enforced, ribbed and resting via studs at several points on the metal frame can take other impacts than a unsupported, thin cover.
    Last edited by AgX; 03-24-2014 at 04:50 AM. Click to view previous post history.

  7. #57
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    Quote Originally Posted by trythis View Post
    That's not the point. Saws, drill bits and rasps are better at telling you what your camera is made of and knowing that will make you a better photographer. You can always fill the holes made by drill bits with bondo, cover them with tape or better yet, put a screw in the hole so the next person repairing it is confused. Saws and rasps require the bondo and paint method for resale for sure, so I recommend a drill bit.

    30+ years in manufacturing,20+ years in camera repair as a hobby I'll do it my way.I'm not worried about resale,when I'm done I'll salvage what parts I can use and the rest will go in the garbage.


    blockend
    Why does it matter if the body is plastic or metal?
    Just trying to answer questions with facts.Metal bodies or more technical metal body frames are better.The alignment between the film plane and lens mount is critical. Die cast aluminum is more stable than plastic. Plastic body coverings are ok.
    APUG: F, F/FTN,F2,F2A,F2AS,F3,F3HP,FA,FE,FM,FM2,FE2,XK,XM,XD, XD-5,XD-7,XD-11,XE,XE-5,XE-7,SRT101,SRT102,XG9,XG7,XG1,XG-SE,XG-M,X700,OM-1,OM-1n,OM-2,OM-2n,OM-4,F-1,F-1N,AE-1P,R5,500C/M,SCII
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  8. #58

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    I guess my sarcasm wasn't obvious.

    sent from phone. excuse my typing.
    "If its not broken, I can't afford it."

  9. #59

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    Quote Originally Posted by fstop View Post
    Metal bodies or more technical metal body frames are better.The alignment between the film plane and lens mount is critical. Die cast aluminum is more stable than plastic. Plastic body coverings are ok.
    I own a wide variety of cameras including SLRs, and haven't reached a firm conclusion about which is 'better' because there are so many things to take into consideration. When I began buying film cameras again after a hiatus, I bought Nikkormats. Most of those were cheap because they were battered, but still worked. Some had extensive damage, large hits to the prism and elsewhere, but all operated properly. Did they work because they were well made and durable, or were they damaged because they were metal skinned, heavy and relatively difficult to hold? I don't know the answer.

    On the other hand all my plastic SLRs are intact and undamaged. I disagree about plastic covered metal chassis cameras, as I suspect they offer the worst of both worlds, being heavy enough to shatter the body on impact, but not light enough to bounce. Ebay contains a large number of modern prosumer DSLRs (metal chassis, plastic cover) sold for 'spares or repair'. These often have shattered corners, missing covers and general fallout from impacts.

    A large impact will kill any camera, it's the usual drops and hits that are difficult to assess. Perhaps professional metal-bodied cameras survive, because their financial and sentimental value to their owner means they aren't thrown in the trash after a fall?

  10. #60
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    Quote Originally Posted by trythis View Post
    I guess my sarcasm wasn't obvious.

    sent from phone. excuse my typing.

    You need to use the [sarcasm] insert sarcasm [/sarcasm] code.

    I own a wide variety of cameras including SLRs, and haven't reached a firm conclusion about which is 'better' because there are so many things to take into consideration. When I began buying film cameras again after a hiatus, I bought Nikkormats. Most of those were cheap because they were battered, but still worked. Some had extensive damage, large hits to the prism and elsewhere, but all operated properly. Did they work because they were well made and durable, or were they damaged because they were metal skinned, heavy and relatively difficult to hold? I don't know the answer.

    On the other hand all my plastic SLRs are intact and undamaged. I disagree about plastic covered metal chassis cameras, as I suspect they offer the worst of both worlds, being heavy enough to shatter the body on impact, but not light enough to bounce. Ebay contains a large number of modern prosumer DSLRs (metal chassis, plastic cover) sold for 'spares or repair'. These often have shattered corners, missing covers and general fallout from impacts.

    A large impact will kill any camera, it's the usual drops and hits that are difficult to assess. Perhaps professional metal-bodied cameras survive, because their financial and sentimental value to their owner means they aren't thrown in the trash after a fall?
    It doesn't have to be impact damage, a large heavy lens mounted on a body exerts a force on the body which tries to bend the mount downward from the body.Mount the body on a tripod now you have more potential for flex/misalignment in the body.


    Ebay is full of all sorts of cameras, hard to draw a conclusion based on what is for sale.
    there are tons of 35mm SLRs for sale on there because people have been moving away from SLRs and/or film to digital or compacts. Its been going for years, even before digital became mainstream.
    Not surprising to see a large number of dead digitals, there are a lot of them sold.


    AgX


    Exactly. That sturdiness of the body is just one part of the story. If one grain of sand can make a camera practically useless (as I experienced with just an AE-1)
    there are other issues related to environmental impact that should be thought about.
    Furthermore, plastic is a very general term, and the design of a cover part is influence too. A part that is thick, fibre enforced, ribbed and resting via studs at several points on the metal frame can take other impacts than a unsupported, thin cover.

    Yes that is true about environmental concerns. Consider that aluminum alloys are recyclable, but engineering plastics that meet aluminum strength and rigidity are not an easily recycled thermoplastic but a thermosetting plastic that can not be recycled.
    APUG: F, F/FTN,F2,F2A,F2AS,F3,F3HP,FA,FE,FM,FM2,FE2,XK,XM,XD, XD-5,XD-7,XD-11,XE,XE-5,XE-7,SRT101,SRT102,XG9,XG7,XG1,XG-SE,XG-M,X700,OM-1,OM-1n,OM-2,OM-2n,OM-4,F-1,F-1N,AE-1P,R5,500C/M,SCII
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