Switch to English Language Passer en langue franÁaise Omschakelen naar Nederlandse Taal Wechseln Sie zu deutschen Sprache Passa alla lingua italiana
Members: 70,958   Posts: 1,558,084   Online: 1092
      
Page 9 of 11 FirstFirst ... 34567891011 LastLast
Results 81 to 90 of 104
  1. #81
    frank's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2002
    Location
    Bit north of Toronto
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    781
    Images
    2
    Titanium?
    My blog / photo website: http://frankfoto.jimdo.com/

  2. #82

    Join Date
    Jan 2005
    Location
    One hour south of the Mackinaw Bridge
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    322
    Quote Originally Posted by PDH View Post
    Which is why Miranda, Petri, Kowa and Topcon are no longer with us.
    Asahi (Pentax) came very close to being added to that list. For that matter, if Canon hadnít gambled, and won, with the A-series, they may have folded too (or at least dropped their camera division and just kept making office equipment).

    Jim B.

  3. #83
    benjiboy's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2005
    Location
    U.K.
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    6,918
    Quote Originally Posted by Mackinaw View Post
    Asahi (Pentax) came very close to being added to that list. For that matter, if Canon hadn’t gambled, and won, with the A-series, they may have folded too (or at least dropped their camera division and just kept making office equipment).

    Jim B.
    Pentax now belongs to the Ricoh corporation.
    Ben

  4. #84
    benjiboy's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2005
    Location
    U.K.
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    6,918
    Quote Originally Posted by AgX View Post
    Very unlikely for several reasons: softness, spec density, price etc.
    I do know what I'm talking about AgX I used to sell these cameras for a living at a leading professional dealers, and because they had a better Silicon Blue exposure meter and shutter priority AE, and metered exposures up to 30 seconds neither of which their Cds cell metered original F1's had many pro. customers bought them as a backup.

    [QUOTE02-2011
    tocopixel
    Has 30+ years of SLR/camera experience.
    Features 10.0 10
    Build 10.0
    The EF was built as an electronic version of Canon's top-of-the line F-1 camera
    None for it's time.
    Similar to the T-90 (1986), it set the benchmark - but was a commercial failure, lasting only a year or so on the market. The Canon EF contained a silicon photocell light meter with a range of EV 18 to EV -2 which measured light in a "central emphasis metering" pattern (also called center weighted average metering) with a bias against the top of the frame, to minimize underexposure due to a bright skyline. The Canon EF could operate "Variable Aperture AE" mode (commonly called shutter priority) or full manual mode, where the operator would control both the shutter speed and the aperture.

    Why so costly? The EF used a unique Platinum shutter among Canon's 35mm SLRs; a Copal Square vertical-travel metal blade focal plane shutter. Unusually, long exposures (from 1 second to 30 seconds) were electronically controlled, while shorter ones (1/1000 second to 1/2 second) were mechanically controlled. This was very useful in conserving battery power, and allowed one to use the camera even with dead batteries. The metering system could also be turned off, e.g. when using flash, or at night, to preserve battery life.

    Powering the electro-mechanical shutter and light meter were two PX 625 1.35 volt mercury batteries. Because the EF contains a unique voltage control system, common 1.5 volt alkaline batteries can be used in lieu of the now-unavailable mercury ones. The EF is the only camera in the manual focus Canon line of the 1960s and 1970s (which includes the FTb, the F-1, and the FT) that can be used with common 1.5 volt batteries without modification to the internal electronics. Like all pre-1987 Canon SLR's, the EF accepted Canon FD mount lenses. The shutter speed range was 1/1000th of a second to 30 seconds (in a beautifully pedantic touch, the 15 & 30 second settings actually give 16 and 32 seconds, thus preserving the doubling sequence), plus bulb. The X-sync was 1/125th of a second. The camera included setting for film speeds of 12 ASA to 3200 ASA.

    The EF also featured a mirror-locking self-timer and a stop-down metering mode which could also be used for depth-of-field preview. The mirror can also be locked up independently of the self-timer for long exposures when the self-timer is not desired.
    Last edited by benjiboy; 03-29-2014 at 09:54 AM. Click to view previous post history.
    Ben

  5. #85
    benjiboy's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2005
    Location
    U.K.
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    6,918
    Quote Originally Posted by frank View Post
    Titanium?
    No Frank, only the F1 shutters were Titanium foil.
    Ben

  6. #86
    frank's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2002
    Location
    Bit north of Toronto
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    781
    Images
    2
    Time to put a roll of film into my EF!

    http://www.fdreview.com/camera-review.php?itemid=4
    Last edited by frank; 03-29-2014 at 10:17 AM. Click to view previous post history.
    My blog / photo website: http://frankfoto.jimdo.com/

  7. #87

    Join Date
    Jan 2005
    Location
    One hour south of the Mackinaw Bridge
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    322
    Quote Originally Posted by benjiboy View Post
    No Frank, only the F1 shutters were Titanium foil.
    I was looking at some old 1965-era magazine ads for the Pellix a few weeks back and it stated that the camera used titanium shutter curtains. This surprised me too, if it's right.

    Jim B.

  8. #88
    benjiboy's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2005
    Location
    U.K.
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    6,918
    Quote Originally Posted by Mackinaw View Post
    I was looking at some old 1965-era magazine ads for the Pellix a few weeks back and it stated that the camera used titanium shutter curtains. This surprised me too, if it's right.

    Jim B.
    No Jim the shutter was cloth, probably rubberized silk as most cloth ones are.
    http://www.mir.com.my/rb/photography...lix/index1.htm
    Ben

  9. #89

    Join Date
    Jan 2005
    Location
    One hour south of the Mackinaw Bridge
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    322
    Quote Originally Posted by benjiboy View Post
    No Jim the shutter was cloth, probably rubberized silk as most cloth ones are.......
    The MIR site contains a lot of inaccuracies. Take a look at the Canon Museum site for more info.

    Outside of that, I can tell you that the shutter is most definitely metal. I own two Pellix cameras (one black, one chrome) and can vouch that it's not cloth. I always thought it was stainless steel, like what was used on Canon rangefinder cameras, but am now starting to think that it is titanium.

    Jim B.

  10. #90
    thundertwin72's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2012
    Location
    Barcelona, SPAIN
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    21
    Quote Originally Posted by benjiboy View Post
    No Jim the shutter was cloth, probably rubberized silk as most cloth ones are.
    http://www.mir.com.my/rb/photography...lix/index1.htm
    Quote Originally Posted by Mackinaw View Post
    The MIR site contains a lot of inaccuracies. Take a look at the Canon Museum site for more info.

    Outside of that, I can tell you that the shutter is most definitely metal. I own two Pellix cameras (one black, one chrome) and can vouch that it's not cloth. I always thought it was stainless steel, like what was used on Canon rangefinder cameras, but am now starting to think that it is titanium.

    Jim B.
    I think both are right:

    Canon Pellix = Metal shutter curtains.

    Canon Pellix QL = Cloth shutter curtains.

    I thought the metal shutters are vertical travel ... is it possible to have horizontal travel?

    Quote Originally Posted by benjiboy View Post
    I do know what I'm talking about AgX I used to sell these cameras for a living at a leading professional dealers, and because they had a better Silicon Blue exposure meter and shutter priority AE, and metered exposures up to 30 seconds neither of which their Cds cell metered original F1's had many pro. customers bought them as a backup.

    [QUOTE02-2011
    tocopixel
    Has 30+ years of SLR/camera experience.
    Features 10.0 10
    Build 10.0
    The EF was built as an electronic version of Canon's top-of-the line F-1 camera
    None for it's time.
    Similar to the T-90 (1986), it set the benchmark - but was a commercial failure, lasting only a year or so on the market. The Canon EF contained a silicon photocell light meter with a range of EV 18 to EV -2 which measured light in a "central emphasis metering" pattern (also called center weighted average metering) with a bias against the top of the frame, to minimize underexposure due to a bright skyline. The Canon EF could operate "Variable Aperture AE" mode (commonly called shutter priority) or full manual mode, where the operator would control both the shutter speed and the aperture.

    Why so costly? The EF used a unique Platinum shutter among Canon's 35mm SLRs; a Copal Square vertical-travel metal blade focal plane shutter. Unusually, long exposures (from 1 second to 30 seconds) were electronically controlled, while shorter ones (1/1000 second to 1/2 second) were mechanically controlled. This was very useful in conserving battery power, and allowed one to use the camera even with dead batteries. The metering system could also be turned off, e.g. when using flash, or at night, to preserve battery life.

    Powering the electro-mechanical shutter and light meter were two PX 625 1.35 volt mercury batteries. Because the EF contains a unique voltage control system, common 1.5 volt alkaline batteries can be used in lieu of the now-unavailable mercury ones. The EF is the only camera in the manual focus Canon line of the 1960s and 1970s (which includes the FTb, the F-1, and the FT) that can be used with common 1.5 volt batteries without modification to the internal electronics. Like all pre-1987 Canon SLR's, the EF accepted Canon FD mount lenses. The shutter speed range was 1/1000th of a second to 30 seconds (in a beautifully pedantic touch, the 15 & 30 second settings actually give 16 and 32 seconds, thus preserving the doubling sequence), plus bulb. The X-sync was 1/125th of a second. The camera included setting for film speeds of 12 ASA to 3200 ASA.

    The EF also featured a mirror-locking self-timer and a stop-down metering mode which could also be used for depth-of-field preview. The mirror can also be locked up independently of the self-timer for long exposures when the self-timer is not desired.
    Another feature of the Canon EF, and many people do not know, is that advances the film to the first frame, without having to fire the shutter. I know of no other camera has this feature.

    Regards.

Page 9 of 11 FirstFirst ... 34567891011 LastLast


 

APUG PARTNERS EQUALLY FUNDING OUR COMMUNITY:



Contact Us  |  Support Us!  |  Advertise  |  Site Terms  |  Archive  ó   Search  |  Mobile Device Access  |  RSS  |  Facebook  |  Linkedin