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  1. #61

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    Quote Originally Posted by StoneNYC View Post
    I suppose it's all in how you shoot. I really mostly use full manual mode all the time, but is usually start with... Well what subject am I working with...? Is it moving, or still? Do I want it to move or blur? And then decide what kind of depth I would like to play with, then balance those and begin shooting, I don't really mess with the shutter speed once I've decided what I want, and stick to mostly 1/60 or 1/125 or 1/250 for almost any circumstance. But during the shoot I usually stick to the chosen shutter speed.

    But that's me...

    Everyone is different, the OP will have to decide what they want.
    Yeah, there is no one right answer. Everyone has what works for them.

  2. #62

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    Quote Originally Posted by frank View Post
    And some people think that because the ae1 sold in large numbers, it is a great camera.

    My perspective is that the ae1 marked the switch over point where cameras became a mass-produced, disposable item, instead of something meant to last for a lifetime with periodic maintenance, and even passed down from one generation to the next. If/when it broke, it was meant to be tossed away. For me, the ae1 marked this change in attitude in cameras. (paradigm-shift)
    In cultural terms I think that kind of makes sense, but I don't think it actually describes the AE-1 very accurately. As far as I remember, they were still expensive enough that people had them repaired instead of replacing them, and they seem to take periodic service perfectly well. IMHO, the "disposable" aspect didn't come in until the advent of cheapo auto-everything P&S cameras in the 1980s/90s.

    I don't have a strong feeling on it personally, but it seems like a reasonable person could argue that the AE-1 is "great" in some sense precisely *because* of the mass-produced aspect. It's sort of the Brownie of its era---a camera that made photography accessible to masses of people, with some compromises. Unlike the Brownie, though, those compromises related to handling and feature set rather than to "performance" in the sense of image quality.

    -NT
    Nathan Tenny
    San Diego, CA, USA

    The lady of the house has to be a pretty swell sort of person to put up with the annoyance of a photographer.
    -The Little Technical Library, _Developing, Printing, And Enlarging_

  3. #63

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    Quote Originally Posted by Alan Gales View Post
    Yeah, there is no one right answer. Everyone has what works for them.
    Of course there is a 'right answer' and here it is:
    Neither. I don't trust anything newer than a Nikkormat FT2; it uses a battery only for the meter, uses cells you can actually get, and uses pre AI lenses.


  4. #64
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    Quote Originally Posted by E. von Hoegh View Post
    Of course there is a 'right answer' and here it is:
    Neither. I don't trust anything newer than a Nikkormat FT2; it uses a battery only for the meter, uses cells you can actually get, and uses pre AI lenses.

    +1
    My blog / photo website: http://frankfoto.jimdo.com/

    Openly biased and unabashedly
    pro film and wet darkroom

  5. #65
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    When you consider the AE-1, you need to think about what was happening in the market when it was introduced.

    It was a fully functional SLR, with shutter priority automatic, compatible with an extensive line of high quality lenses, and it was priced low enough to be attractive to a large number of people who would never have considered an SLR before.

    In its day, many films were a bit slower (think Kodachrome), so shutter priority automatic was very attractive.

    It caused a lot of people to move from Instamatics to SLRs.

    And the economies of scale that arose from mass production made it possible.

    I sold a lot of them in its day.
    Matt

    “Photography is a complex and fluid medium, and its many factors are not applied in simple sequence. Rather, the process may be likened to the art of the juggler in keeping many balls in the air at one time!”

    Ansel Adams, from the introduction to The Negative - The New Ansel Adams Photography Series / Book 2

  6. #66
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    Quote Originally Posted by ntenny View Post
    In cultural terms I think that kind of makes sense, but I don't think it actually describes the AE-1 very accurately. As far as I remember, they were still expensive enough that people had them repaired instead of replacing them, and they seem to take periodic service perfectly well. IMHO, the "disposable" aspect didn't come in until the advent of cheapo auto-everything P&S cameras in the 1980s/90s.

    I don't have a strong feeling on it personally, but it seems like a reasonable person could argue that the AE-1 is "great" in some sense precisely *because* of the mass-produced aspect. It's sort of the Brownie of its era---a camera that made photography accessible to masses of people, with some compromises. Unlike the Brownie, though, those compromises related to handling and feature set rather than to "performance" in the sense of image quality.

    -NT
    Pintos were sold in great numbers (10 million) no one considers them great.The difference is the AE-1 won't explode if it hit in the film door.
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  7. #67
    AgX
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    Following this thread it seems to me the AE-1 has quite a different reputation in the US than over here.

    (The same time the Pentax K-1000, a camera I never heard of back then, is praised there as learner camera, though it even lacks DOF-control.)

  8. #68
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    AE-1P over the AE-1. Has full manual, shutter priority, aperture priority, very simple all-on-one-dial use, very good ergonomics. Drawback is the LCD light meter, but it works pretty well.
    -Markster

    Canon AE-1P 35mm | 50mm/f1.8 FDn | 28mm/2.8 FD | 70-200mm/f4-5 FD | 35-70mm/F2.8-3.5 Sigma FD

  9. #69

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    Ae-1p doesn't have aperture priority, just the A-1.

    sent from phone. excuse my typing.
    "If its not broken, I can't afford it."

  10. #70
    AgX
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    This has been hinted at before, but I consider it important:

    Who ever is into using different camera makes and types should think of the working-orientation of the focusing barrel of Nikon cameras.
    Which is not shared by many. Conservatively speaking...



 

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