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  1. #21

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    Quote Originally Posted by John Koehrer View Post

    None of which helps the OP getting to his fungal problem besides Xmas. Remove the decorator
    plate, unscrew three screws and invert the lens. The front group should just drop out.
    Usually fungus is inside the front and/or rear groups so should both be accessible without taking the
    lens mount off.
    Alas no with the type II E undoing the three screws just released the focus ring with the distance scale. Which you can lift off.
    You then can undo (ie unscrew) the inner heliciod to remove the whole optic and iris assembly as a unit.
    A pro repair guy would just add grease in situ and not undo...
    Cause getting it back is difficult.
    I always disassemble and degrease to remove any grit.
    This is why I don't get a pro repair job.
    There are a different three screws which may well release the front lens optics but I did not disturb. Other than using day glow nail lacquer on their surface.

    Noel

  2. #22
    John_Nikon_F's Avatar
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    Cross-point screws are easy to destroy without the proper screwdriver. Learned the hard way when I did my last 85/1.8 K-type AI conversion. Destroyed one of the mount screws using a #0 Phillips screwdriver. Wound up using a tapered screw extractor to remove it. Bought the proper screwdriver from one of the repair shops I frequent. Now, lens mount screws are no big deal, even if they are crosspoint. With the slotted screws, take a 3.5mm slotted screwdriver and grind it down until it fits the screw exactly. Even if threadlocking compound was used, which most Nikkors have if they haven't been worked on previously, the screws come out VERY easily.

    The focusing rings come off in various methods, some require rolling the grip off the ring, others have a two-piece ring (read the Nikkor-S/SC and early K-type 50/1.4's) that needs to be split using a rubber band on the front part of the ring, and others have set screws that are accessible under the filter ring (Nikkor-H/HC 50/2, and possibly the K-type and AI versions as well).

    -J
    APUG: F5, F3HP, F2AS, F FTn, Nikomat FT2, FTn, Nikkormat EL, FT
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  3. #23
    Newt_on_Swings's Avatar
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    Good screw drivers and downward pressure is a must. Thread locker such as red loctite needs heat to break the bond. A soldering iron held of the head of screw will do it. I actually have one lens I took apart from my super ikonta that has fungus that I can't reach as There is a tiny set screw that is worn away. I tried going in from the back but couldn't reach the lens elements I needed too. I don't think there is any way to get it out as I had to file down a flat head screw driver to get the other 2 out. Really tiny stuff is always a headache.

  4. #24

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    Well my soldering iron did not have enough wattage to soften the glue.

    I've used locktight compounds but never had one as stubborn before.

    When I reassemble I use nail lacquer after the screw is home.

    If you use high quality tools you have a greater risk of damaging screw heads.

  5. #25

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    Quote Originally Posted by Newt_on_Swings View Post
    Good screw drivers and downward pressure is a must. Thread locker such as red loctite needs heat to break the bond. A soldering iron held of the head of screw will do it. I actually have one lens I took apart from my super ikonta that has fungus that I can't reach as There is a tiny set screw that is worn away. I tried going in from the back but couldn't reach the lens elements I needed too. I don't think there is any way to get it out as I had to file down a flat head screw driver to get the other 2 out. Really tiny stuff is always a headache.
    Lens need service so I don't think Nikon used Red Loctite. Nikon repairmans don't drill screwheads.
    I found that thread locker is like Blue Loctite >>> medium strength ... > servisable.

  6. #26
    Newt_on_Swings's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by F4user View Post
    Lens need service so I don't think Nikon used Red Loctite. Nikon repairmans don't drill screwheads.
    I found that thread locker is like Blue Loctite >>> medium strength ... > servisable.
    Yup you are totally correct, I don't think any camera company uses such strong loctite, but some other people who aren't repairmen might unknowingly use it. I use blue loctite for many applications myself if I know that lens has screws that get loose easily through use or vibration, I actually don't even use the liquid, there is a new type of loctite thread tape that I cut a sliver off and wrap, less messy. I've repaired a few lenses where I had to chip off nail polish too. Sometimes only way is to drill on a botched up repair.

  7. #27

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    Quote Originally Posted by Newt_on_Swings View Post
    Yup you are totally correct, I don't think any camera company uses such strong loctite, but some other people who aren't repairmen might unknowingly use it. I use blue loctite for many applications myself if I know that lens has screws that get loose easily through use or vibration, I actually don't even use the liquid, there is a new type of loctite thread tape that I cut a sliver off and wrap, less messy. I've repaired a few lenses where I had to chip off nail polish too. Sometimes only way is to drill on a botched up repair.
    The rule book is to tighten the screw clean with nail varnish remover and paint on the nail varnish.
    If you need to remove screw remove nail varnish first with nail varnish remover.
    The infinity adjust screws on my E were so treated.
    I use day glow so you can see it...

  8. #28

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    To remove stubborn screws, use a small hammer and rap on the screwdriver while trying to unscrew the screw. (2) Put hot soldering iron on screw to soften the adhesive holding the screw in. Actually, do number 2 before using hammer. Unscrew while the screw is hot.

  9. #29
    MartinCrabtree's Avatar
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    If you're going to use Loctite use 222 (purple) low strength. It's made for small stuff that doesn't see a lot of vibration. Use a small dot applied via toothpick for cleanest most efficient results.

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