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  1. #1

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    Looking for a Canon eos body with a build in spotmeter

    Hi guys,

    For a couple of weeks now i have been looking for a substitute to my Canon Eos 300 camera.

    I have 2 basic reasons for an upgrade.
    - First of all my current body seems to be scratching film now and then.
    - Second i am looking for a body which supports spotmetering.

    I find especially on the spotmeter part that knowledge about canon film camera's is limited on the internet(might be me looking for the wrong terms however). But so far i have concluded that both the eos 1 and eos 650 have a spotmeter. Both of which are one of the older types. My concern over these camera's is that they were basicly one of the first canon bodies in de eos line. And that due to this fact they were not camera's with the most stable software.

    So preferably i would like a camera build after say 1995, a time when eos camera's were a bit more mature.

    Its a shame im bound to canon for photography. I know for instance that most Nikon camera's do have a spotmeter. Problem is, 99% of the glass i own is EF mount.

  2. #2
    Hatchetman's Avatar
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    EOS 3 is one option

  3. #3

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    Eos 3 indeed looks promising enough. 2.4% fov spotmeter seems good enough. Its certainly alot better then centerweigted etc. And its for sure one of the later generation. Il keep my eye out for one. Thanks!

  4. #4
    TheFlyingCamera's Avatar
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    An EOS Elan II or an A2 would also be good options. Or even an EOS 1N. If you get a 1N without the vertical grip, you can get one for cheap - under $200 USD. And you'll be getting a pro-spec body with spot, center weight, and evaluative metering, weather sealing, and rugged construction.

  5. #5
    Dr Croubie's Avatar
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    EOS 3 not only has the spotmeter, but AF-point linked spotmeter. IE, the position of the spotmeter changes position based on where it's focussed (you can of course turn this off to keep it in the centre anyway).
    Very useful feature for something like portraits, focus and meter on the face, which is 2/3 up the vertical frame.
    An awful lot of electrons were terribly inconvenienced in the making of this post.

  6. #6
    jcc
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    1v has spot metering, and multiples can be averaged too.

  7. #7
    Gimenosaiz's Avatar
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    EOS 3 !!
    Analogue flickr
    Thank you for this forum !!

  8. #8
    Poisson Du Jour's Avatar
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    There are several EOS bodies with an on-board spot meter, but the methodology and application differs for each. On the EOS 1N, the single level spot meter is designed for assessment of parts of the scene to read off differences in the calculated exposure. It has no 'layering' or averaging function, which limits its application. This implication is that the 1N's spot meter requires a requisite understanding of tones and their importance, rather than trusting, arbitrary placement and reliance on the spot meter in the frame to provide a correct exposure, which because of its simple design, it not actually guaranteed unless you are aiming it at a part of the scene that approximates a light to moderate mid-tone. The EOS 1V however took spot metering to a multi-level averaged approach equal to using a hand-held spot meter. The capacity to shift the meter point around, and 'pancake' several readings, then average them, with one of highlight, midtone or shadow bias, was a big step over the 1N's rudimentary meter. The EOS 3 was a hybrid variation that came after the 1N. In summary, a single spot metering function is not as useful as a 8- or 9- level multispot/shifting spot metering facility but you must first clue up on what to meter, where and when. In skilled hands, multispot metering can far surpass the results provided by evaluative/multipattern/matrix metering systems.
    .::Gary Rowan Higgins

    A comfort zone is a wonderful place. But nothing ever grows there.
    —Anon.






  9. #9
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    I have an EOS 5 (A2/A2e), IIRC it has 'partial' metering (I think Canon's description for 'nearly spot-metering'). It was a very well specified camera (5fps without a booster battery). The downside is that the mode dial (to the left of the prism viewed from the rear) is quite fragile and breaks easily. Mine now spins very freely, the lock/ratchet mechanism has broken.

  10. #10
    Poisson Du Jour's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by johnha View Post
    I have an EOS 5 (A2/A2e), IIRC it has 'partial' metering (I think Canon's description for 'nearly spot-metering'). It was a very well specified camera (5fps without a booster battery). The downside is that the mode dial (to the left of the prism viewed from the rear) is quite fragile and breaks easily. Mine now spins very freely, the lock/ratchet mechanism has broken.

    Partial metering is for strong backlit subjects. It does work very well for that purpose.

    The mode dial is / has been a never-ending Achilles heel for the EOS 5/ A2 / A2E model. It is a seriously flawed and flimsy design. Mine broke twice before I got sick of it and then, without warning, the back cover locking latch also broke. That was the dummy spit: the camera was then tossed for scrap about 6 years ago.
    .::Gary Rowan Higgins

    A comfort zone is a wonderful place. But nothing ever grows there.
    —Anon.






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