Switch to English Language Passer en langue française Omschakelen naar Nederlandse Taal Wechseln Sie zu deutschen Sprache Passa alla lingua italiana
Members: 75,718   Posts: 1,670,003   Online: 1059
      
Page 1 of 3 123 LastLast
Results 1 to 10 of 23
  1. #1

    Join Date
    Jun 2015
    Shooter
    Medium Format
    Posts
    11

    Olympus FTL Camera - Anyone know much about this camera?

    Hey everyone

    Just picked up this little beauty in a charity shop this afternoon. I can't seem to find out much about it.

    Anyone know much about the Olympus FTL camera and is it any good?

    Came with 50mm f1.8 and 135mm f3.5 both in excellent condition.

  2. #2

    Join Date
    Jun 2012
    Location
    UK
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    2,511
    Images
    6
    Without wanting to sound snitty, I just googled "olympus ftl" and found several pages all about it
    e.g. http://www.biofos.com/cornucop/ftl.html

  3. #3

    Join Date
    Jun 2015
    Shooter
    Medium Format
    Posts
    11
    Quote Originally Posted by pdeeh View Post
    Without wanting to sound snitty, I just googled "olympus ftl" and found several pages all about it
    e.g. http://www.biofos.com/cornucop/ftl.html
    Lol, thanks. What I should have asked is if any other members have one and their opinion of it?

  4. #4
    Rick A's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2009
    Location
    north central Pa
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    6,991
    Images
    46
    My first 35 mm SLR, great camera. Built in-house by Olympus while they were working out the bugs on the OM system. I burned many a roll through mine before finally stepping up to an OM-1. I believe it used the same meter as the OM, I don't recall much more about it, it's been many decades ago since I owned it.
    Rick Allen
    Argentum aevum

  5. #5
    flavio81's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2014
    Location
    Lima, Peru
    Shooter
    Medium Format
    Posts
    951
    An M42 camera built by Olympus can't be a bad thing at all, i'd guess.

  6. #6

    Join Date
    Sep 2006
    Location
    UK
    Shooter
    35mm RF
    Posts
    4,929
    It is an ok camera as a shooter and collectable.

    You just got a bargain.

  7. #7

    Join Date
    Sep 2005
    Location
    Snapping for 49+ years in Tennessee
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    318
    I never owned one but while working a photo store in the early 70's I was able to "check out" most of the equipment we sold. When the FTL came out I used one several times and was impressed with the quality and then the OM1 came out, big game changer, no one even looked at the FTL, they all wanted the OM1. It is a quality camera and the lenses are very good.

  8. #8

    Join Date
    Jul 2012
    Shooter
    Medium Format
    Posts
    80
    I've got one. Found it cheaply at a local market with the 50mm Zuiko f/1.8. It was basically working but be aware that unlike some Japanese SLRs (Eg. SRT101) the light seals are not belt and braces, if they are not in good order you will get light leaks. So make sure these are up to scratch.

    My example was overall in very good condition except a little missing black paint on the front cover, I've seen a few suffering from this so I gather it's not unknown. You can fill in the missing paint easily enough, if you're handy with that sort of thing.

    The one I found has a good accurate meter and works well. The only issue after running a roll of Kodak Ultramax through it was that the 1/1000 (and possibly 1/500 speed) were capping a bit. I didn't notice this at the time so there were a couple of frames on the film that were only partly exposed. It sat in the cabinet for a while (too many cameras, not enough time) but I pulled it out a couple of weeks ago and investigated the fault. It seemed the first curtain wasn't keeping ahead of the second at the higher speeds so I took a stab that the springs had lost a little tension. After removing the lower cover (the typical pain free exercise it is with most older Japanese SLRs) I was able to increase the curtain tension very slightly, and, following this, the 1/1000 speed came good right across the gate. I still haven't replaced the light seals (I used black tape as insurance to quickly run a test roll through) so when I have a half hour or so free I'll do this and then the FTL will be fully fit for service. I'm not exactly lacking in M42 bodies but the FTL is a very competent camera and I expect it to get some use later this year.

    Ivor Matanle mentions the 50mm Zuiko in his book "Collecting and Using Classic SLRs" and rates the Zuiko quite highly, ahead of even the equivalent Takumar. As an interim model between the half frame Pen F and the OM-1, the FTL is significant as Olympus's first full frame 35mm SLR, but with the OM in the pipeline, it had a short production life cycle and just a few thousand were made. It's therefore, potentially, one of the more collectible earlier Olympus cameras, and very usable, so it's recommended if one encounters a sound example at a reasonable price.
    Cheers
    Brett

  9. #9

    Join Date
    Jan 2008
    Shooter
    35mm
    Posts
    347
    Quote Originally Posted by Rick A View Post
    Built in-house by Olympus while they were working out the bugs on the OM system.
    Actually, as the story goes the FTL was somewhat of an in-house competitor to the OM. There were some at Olympus that were not confident that Maitani would be able to make good on his promise of the OM and they wanted something safe and more conventional to replace the half frame Pens. There has been some debate as to whether the FTL was designed in house or whether this was subcontracted out, but the consensus seems to be that it is a true Olympus.

    Olympus advertised the open aperture metering, but I don't know if this was the first screw mount camera to allow open aperture metering. There was a small system made, consisting of a 28f3.5, 35f2.8, 50f1.8, 50f1.4, 135f3.5 and 200f4. So now you can set your goal to collecting all the lenses! The aperture setting on all the lenses was clickless, to facilitate dialing in the correct aperture.

    As pointed out above, once the OM hit the market it was all over for the FTL. It is not that it is a bad camera; I personally like mine and find it very usable. But it did not stand out from everything else on the market while the OM certainly did.

    One thing I found interesting was that the shape of the film advance lever was changed at some point. The original one was long and pointed and looked like it came off of the 35 SP. This was changed to a stubby one with a flat pad on the end. My theory is that since the viewfinder was in the middle of the camera (unlike a rangefinder where it was over to the side), the long pointed lever would poke you in the right eye if you used the left eye on the viewfinder (at least that is how it worked for me).

  10. #10
    Rick A's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2009
    Location
    north central Pa
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    6,991
    Images
    46
    It's also interesting to note, Olympus had to approve the design, then tool up to manufacture the FTL line, all the while working on building the OM line. The FTL's were on the market well over a year prior to the OM-1 making its debut. I certainly enjoyed my FTL, I had the Zuiko 28, 50/1.4, and 135 lenses. I also had a couple aftermarket lenses, one notably was an Asanuma zoom that was a neck breaker when I carried it, but sweet on a tripod. That was my go to lens at Watkins Glen shooting the USGP.
    Rick Allen
    Argentum aevum

Page 1 of 3 123 LastLast


 

APUG PARTNERS EQUALLY FUNDING OUR COMMUNITY:



Contact Us  |  Support Us!  |  Advertise  |  Site Terms  |  Archive  —   Search  |  Mobile Device Access  |  RSS  |  Facebook  |  Linkedin