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Thread: Nikon lenses

  1. #11

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    Seele, the camera and lens were signficantly less expensive than renting a Nikon for a week. I simply wanted to see for myself. I will be doing a 50mm comparison as I have both AF and MF Minolta lenses. I wanted to have access to lenses that I can't afford with a Minolta system. Can't rent Minolta G glass here in Minneapolis, but do have access to rentals from both Canon and Nikon. So if I have a body that I am familiar with, renting a lens will be only a minor expense. Ex. I am driving out to New Mexico this summer for a week. I thought it might be nice to have an ultra wide for scenics. The Minolta would cost me more than $600 but I could rent a Nikon for perhaps $75. Don't get me wrong, I love the Minolta glass I have but sometimes I can't get my job done with what I have to use.

  2. #12
    bobfowler's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by unohuu
    I am expanding my manual focus cameras to include a Nikon N2000. I thought this would be a good way to gradually decide if I want to convert from Minolta to Nikon. I am starting with a 50mm f/1.8 lens and want to use an 85 or 100mm lens for some portrait work. I am also hoping that I can use both AF and MF lenses as this is what I understood this particular camera is capable of. Given this, which lens would you recommend next for quick and light portrait work? I do not like or want zooms at this point and can't afford the AF-S lenses. TIA
    You can't go wrong with an 85mm f/1.8 or 105mm f/2.5 for portraits. I know you said you have no interest in zooms, but the 75-150 Series E is excellent as is the 50-135 AIS.
    Bob Fowler
    fowler@verizon.net
    Some people are like Slinkies. They're really good for nothing, but they still bring a smile to your face when you push them down a flight of stairs.

  3. #13

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    I can only go off of what I've owned or do own.

    I love my 24mm f/2.8 AIS and hear the 28mm f/2.8 AIS is even better. I cannot find fault with mine. For the ridiculously low price you'll pay, I don't see why one wouldn't get a 50mm f/1.8 whether it's the AI, AIS or E-series. I owned the 50mm f/1.4 AIS and sold it to keep my 50mm f/1.8 E-series. It seemed softer, was heavier, was larger and I didn't see a need for both.

    Now, onto my two favorites: The Micro-Nikkor 55mm f/2.8 AIS and the 85mm f/1.4 AIS. The 55mm is razor RAZOR sharp and works as a 1:2 macro lens without an extender or 1:1 macro lens with the PK13 extension tube. It's really my first choice for an everyday lens with my FE2 (in fact, I have my FE2 and Micro-Nikkor with me at work today). The 85mm is awesome for portraits and low-light. I used that setup with NPH film in a dim room where everyone else was using flashes, last night. Regardless of how great the 85mm f/1.4's pictures are, I kind of wish I hadn't traded my 85mm f/2 AIS in for it. Not only is the f/2 half the price, it's 1/3 the size and 1/3 the weight. If you can stand using an f/2.8 lens, the Micro-Nikkor is amazing. If you can stand the size of the 85mm f/1.4 AIS, it's a beautiful lens as well. I could really use those two as my only lenses for most everything.

  4. #14
    Ara Ghajanian's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Mongo
    There are a lot of great Nikkor lenses out there, and if you're happy with manual focus you can get staggeringly good glass for very little money. The pages on Nikkor lenses that start at http://www.mir.com.my/rb/photography...rces/index.htm have more information than you'll ever need on just about every Nikkor lens ever made.
    That website is a great and invaluable resource for Nikon manual focus cameras and lenses, by the way. I do most of my research at that website. It's designed by a guy in Malaysia, so his English takes some getting used to. The design of the site is a bit cumbersome and it takes a while to get used to navigation, but it is great nonetheless.

    I've got a Nikkor 50mm f1.4 AIS, 105mm f2.5 AIS and a 55mm micro. They are all great lenses. You could buy any of these lenses in great condition for under $200 each. I personally like the bokeh of Nikkor lenses, but I can see why someone might not.
    Just because you're not paranoid doesn't mean they're not out to get you.

  5. #15

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    I'd also suggest the 75-150. Cheap, around enought to find one, and very good. Sorry I sold mine. You can also get them chipped later if you want for metering in the newer cameras. I now shoot a AF 70-210 F4-5.6 that for the cheaper prices is pretty nice off the extremes. It usually has a decent write up in most compendium books. The older F4 is considered a better lens, but I believe it was manual focus only?

  6. #16
    Frank Petronio's Avatar
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    Don't both with a 2020 body for AF - first generation AF had a lot of problems... If you like MF, you can build a nice set from more classic "metal" gear.

  7. #17

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    Anything from 85 to 100 mm will make a good portrait lens for 35mm format. Anything longer (135mm) will cause to much perspective flattening and not produce good portraits.

  8. #18
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    Hey Luke, made a similar move not too long ago. Simply because, in my estimation, both Pentax and Minolta had quit the game. Jumped to Nikon to avail myself of the luxury of being able to buy new manual focus prime lenses. Nikon appears to be "the last man standing" in that market. I've found nikon AIS lenses to be every bit as good as the favorites from Minolta and Pentax of old.

    I have to add my endorsement for the Nikkor 28mm, f/2.8 AIS and the 105mm, f/2.5 AIS. Both are very simply outstanding - particularily the 28/2.8...this lens is nothing short of amazing. You owe it to yourself to at least shoot a couple of rolls with one.

  9. #19
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    Try the Nikon 85mm f1.8. Very compact and gives great results. BLIGHTY
    Norman is an island.Time and tide wait for Norman.

  10. #20
    Jeffrey A. Steinberg's Avatar
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    I have the following and love it:

    --FM3A (new)
    --24 2.8 AIS (bought new for $280--can't beat that)
    --105 2.5 AIS (amazing lens)
    --80 2.0 AIS (just as nice)
    --135 2.0 (a bit heavy but makes for nice portraits from afar)
    --50 1.2 (bought new for $350)

    Love all of the above. 24 2.8 stays on the camera most of the time.
    --Jeffrey

    ______________________________________________
    Jeffrey Steinberg, K2MIT
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    www.jsteinbergphoto.com (my avocation)
    www.reversis.com (my vocation)

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