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Thread: Nikon lenses

  1. #1

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    Nikon lenses

    I am expanding my manual focus cameras to include a Nikon N2000. I thought this would be a good way to gradually decide if I want to convert from Minolta to Nikon. I am starting with a 50mm f/1.8 lens and want to use an 85 or 100mm lens for some portrait work. I am also hoping that I can use both AF and MF lenses as this is what I understood this particular camera is capable of. Given this, which lens would you recommend next for quick and light portrait work? I do not like or want zooms at this point and can't afford the AF-S lenses. TIA
    Luke

    To create one's own world in any of the arts takes courage.

    Georgia O'Keefe

  2. #2
    Mongo's Avatar
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    My recommendation would be the 105mm f/2.5. It's a legendary lens. Search the web and you'll find lots of information on it. The AIS version spends significant amounts of time on my FE2. (The built in sliding lens hood on th AIS version is very nice. I don't know if the newer AF versions have one or not.)

    Since the lens has been made for so long, there are a ton of them available on the used market. Check KEH.com; they usually have a Bargain condition AIS for around $100-$110.
    Film is cheap. Opportunities are priceless.

  3. #3

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    Nikon series E 100mm f2.8. Not Auto focus, but for portrait work who needs AF?

    Wayne

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    Thanks, Mongo and Wayne. The N2000 is not AF, but has an incorporated drive. This camera comes w/an AF lens though. I am not sure that I will be able to use E lenses as I am still learning about all the mounts variations for Nikon.
    Luke

    To create one's own world in any of the arts takes courage.

    Georgia O'Keefe

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    E series are simply AIS type "economy" lens.

    Wayne

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    On the N2000 you can use any AI or newer lens. This includes AF lenses, but of course they will be manual focus only.

    You could also consider the N2020 body. It's essentially identical to the N2000 except that it has autofocus. You can still use the manual focus lenses, but the AF lenses will work in both AF and MF modes.

  7. #7

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    i am much more interested in gaining access to the Nikon legendary lens system than I am the Nikon light boxes (bodies). The glass is the draw. If I like the look and feel and bokeh and contrast, then I can look for a sturdier manual focus body. This combo was too inexpensive to pass up. Luke
    Luke

    To create one's own world in any of the arts takes courage.

    Georgia O'Keefe

  8. #8
    Mongo's Avatar
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    If you decide to go with a longer lens and find that you like it (and either the 105mm f/2.5 or 100mm f/2.8 are good lenses to try), I'd suggest you look into a 28mm f/2.8 AIS lens next. It's the best (in my opinion) of the Nikkor wide angle lenses for minimized distortion and resistance to flare. My standard "kit" when I'm travelling light includes the 105mm f/2.5, the 28mm f/2.8 (AIS only...not the older AI), and the 50mm f/1.8. (I like the f/1.4, but don't do enough low light shooting to justify owning one myself.)

    There are a lot of great Nikkor lenses out there, and if you're happy with manual focus you can get staggeringly good glass for very little money. The pages on Nikkor lenses that start at http://www.mir.com.my/rb/photography...rces/index.htm have more information than you'll ever need on just about every Nikkor lens ever made.
    Film is cheap. Opportunities are priceless.

  9. #9
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    When I was doing photojournalism with my Nikon FE, I used the Series E 135mm 2.8 lens as my "normal" lens for about 15 years. I found it worked in nearly all situations (except for shots of large groups).

    I just sold the camera and my MF lenses a few months ago. They had seen much use over the past 20 years.
    Dean Tomasula
    The Place for Pix
    Stock and Fine Art Photography

  10. #10
    Seele's Avatar
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    unohuu,

    I wonder why you did not just hire or borrow a Nikon kit just for a taste, and for making side-by-side comparisons with your established Minolta kit.

    Another issue worth comtemplating is your desire to go for Nikon for its reputation. Now, reputation is a funny thing that tends to go before the name, and of course it is based on other people's criteria on what makes something "good". For me, I do not like the Nikon lenses for the "look" of their images; having been brought up on Teutonic glassware notwithstanding, I do not feel the bokeh offered by Nikon to my taste at all, and actually prefer Minolta glass for its more pleasant look.

    But as usual, YMMV; pay your money and take your ride; good luck!

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