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Thread: Slippery Zoom?

  1. #1

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    Slippery Zoom?

    This is my first post. and I already have a question
    I just brought an used vivitar series 1 70-210mm zoom for my Pentax camera. It a lovely heavy all metal lens with an old fashion push and pull design. My problem with it is that the zoom doesn't seem to want to stay in one place. It'll slide up and down depending on how I'm pointing it. Is this a problem inherent to the push and pull design?

  2. #2
    Donald Qualls's Avatar
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    That sounds as if the damping grease has migrated -- which is potentially bad, since some of the likely places it could go are onto the inner lens surfaces and the diaphragm blades...
    Photography has always fascinated me -- as a child, simply for the magic of capturing an image onto glossy paper with a little box, but as an adult because of the unique juxtaposition of science and art -- the physics of optics, the mechanics of the camera, the chemistry of film and developer, alongside the art in seeing, composing, exposing, processing and printing.

  3. #3

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    would I be able to see the grease on the inner lens surfaces? just looking through the lens, I can't see anything on any elements or the blades. and I do like the pictures that I took with this lens. But the zoom creep is still annoying. is there any easy fix that can at least alleviate that problem?
    thanks for the quick response.

  4. #4

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    I have a simple solution to your problem.It was passed on to me by an old school shooter who saw me plagued with the same delima.I purchased a cheap tele-zoom for my Yashica FX3 and it slid back and forth at will. Heres what you do.
    Extend the barrel to its full length.Cut a strip of electrical tape to fit the entire length of the inner barrel and apply. If that doesn"t work repeat with another strip on the opposite side of the inner barrel.You may need 3 or 4 strips.
    I have 3 old pieces of glass that have been made workable using this method.

    Good Luck,
    Mike

  5. #5

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    It's not an uncommon problem these days. I have a Canon EF 100-300 zoom that does the same thing. It's only a problem when the camera's on a tripod since I can hold the zoom in position when I'm handholding. When using a tripod, I attach a large rubber band to the lens barrel--either in front of or in back of the zoom ring, depending on which direction the camera's tilted.

  6. #6
    eagleowl's Avatar
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    I have...

    ...a Vivitar series 1 28-135mm for my canon eos~it has the same problem.
    A common mistake people made when designing something completely foolproof was to underestimate the ingenuity of complete fools.

    Computers are incredibly stupid,but they are capable of being incredibly stupid many millions of times a second.

    Both said by Doug Adams

    Only put off until tomorrow that which you are prepared to die having not done-Pablo Picasso

  7. #7

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    thanks for all the advices. I tried the electric tape trick. It worked like wonder! only took one strip of tape too; guess I still have some damping grease in there. now I can enjoy this old Kiron made lens for many more years.
    love these "home remedies". maybe we should start a thread listing all the tricks passed down from the old timers.

    cheers

  8. #8

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    Glad the electric tape cured your lens woes.
    Unless you are familiar with a camera or lens and its internal components its always best to use simple solutions. When you start popping off screws and unscrewing internal parts 9 times out of 10 you wind up with a paper weight. I know! just check out the "parts drawer" in my darkroom.
    Good Shooting,
    Mike

  9. #9

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    Regarding Viv S-1 glass. There are numerous (8) Series 1, 70-210 lenses. However, for the sake of discussion, we will deal with the first five. The 4th & 5th editions are nothing to seriously consider, so we will concentrate on the first three editions, which are the good one's. The 4th & 5th editions are also 2.8-4 variable aperture model's, but lacking in construction quality (Cosina built). Due to the fact that the third one is a variable aperture lens, (2.8-4) it will be somewhat sharper than a fixed aperture lenses. It is much easier to design and build a quality variable aperture lens.
    The first edition was designed by Vivitar (Ellis Betensky of NASA Optics fame,had a hand in it) and built by Kiron. (67mm filter-macro engagement collar) It is a professional caliber lens, with a 1:2 macro feature built into it. It was the first zoom, designed with the aid of computers, that truly rivaled the OEM lenses of the time. That was in "76." It is a very high quality zoom, that will deliver professional quality results.

    The second edition (my personal favorite) was built by Tokina, per, Vivitars specs. It too, is a fixed 3.5 aperture, but smaller, lighter and sharper. (62mm filter size). I really like it because of the fixed 3.5 aperture which is nice for focusing in dim light and long range flash work. However, not a true macro, 1:4 life size. However, it deliver's extremely good results!

    The third edition was made by Komine, and like the first two, is very well built. It is a 2.8-4 variable aperture lens, and the sharpest of the bunch. It has 1:2.5 life size macro from 100-210mm's, with a working distance of about two feet. Which can be quite useful,too prevent your own shadow from falling onto the subject, or when shooting fractious crittures. (Rattlesnakes) Been there, done that. Can you see a discernible difference in slides taken with either one of them? Probably not! Don't get caught up in bench tests. Any of the first three editions will give you professional-publishable images. I really like this lens, and in time, may become my favorite.

    Personally, I recommend the second or third edition of the line. I have and use all three of the first editions, and can highly recommend any one of them. Superb optics and construction.

    Also, the Kiron 70-210 f/4, is an excellent performer that deliver's professional caliber results. The Kiron 70-210 f/4, also has a great zoom-lock feature, that locks the zooming collar in place, so that there is no zoom creep or slippage.

    If you have anymore questions about the Vivitar or Kiron lenses, or want more detailed information on a particular lens, please don't hesitate to ask. I also have the the production code for the Vivitar lens line, which enables me to identify the manufacturer, and date of manufacture, for any of the Vivitar lenses. Are you aware of the Viv S-1 28-90 the Kiron 28-85 or the Kiron 28-105? As for Kiron glass, well that's another discussion.....

    Kiron Kid



 

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