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  1. #11
    Daniel Lawton's Avatar
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    The Elan has an option that Canon calls partial metering where an area taking up 10% of the viewfinder at the center of the scene is used. I've found this mode to be more than adequate for the quasi-zone system methods most roll film users like myself partake in.

  2. #12
    djklmnop's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Kiron Kid
    Oh. I was just kidding. But keep in mind, that we're talking roll film, not sheet film here. I'm a practitioner of the Zone system too. However, to achieve it's full benefits, one must soup the frames individually. Not possible with roll film.

    Kiron Kid
    Spot meter is still useful not merely for the Zone System but for isolated readings on surface values. Slide film users will find it benificial if they want to specifically place highlight values. The Zone System is intended for sheet film, sure. But spot meter is still highly useful for 35mm to determine range-of-light and shadow placement interpretation off a subject. The Zone System may not be 100% effective with roll film, but it will allow you to predict the outcome of your final image within the given limits of development. One can judicially determine the final printing needs from the predicted outcome of the negative and visualize the printing needs (grade) to
    match what the negative has given. There are also secondary options, such as Selenium toning the negative to gain a stop of higlight, etc. Photography is only as difficult as one wants to make it, and the more difficult we make it, the more flexibility we will have in our creative options.

    Perhaps I am taking your comment too personally, but it just sounds too much like a digital photographer's version of, "You don't need to learn exposure, fix it in Photoshop, later." I doubt that is your intention, but those who are not as knowledgable about the subject and are seeking advice for the first time are going to disregard the importance of spot meter and won't bother to understand why. The best answer they will be able to give is, "because someone told me I didn't need it."

    Andy
    Money is not the problem. The problem is, I don't have any.

  3. #13

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    I have tried both (and have the predecessor EOS 30).

    I find the Canon to be placed somewhere between the F80 and the F100 when it comes to quality, features and the way it is build. I vote for the Canon!

  4. #14
    FrankB's Avatar
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    A friend has the EOS 30, I have an F80, another friend has a Minolta Dynax 5.

    All are excellent cameras. All have excellent lenses available for them. All have very good and slightly different feature sets. All have different quirks to their handling.

    My advice would be to go to a good dealer and handle each of the cameras. Find which of them fits your hand and requires no thought at all to locate each of the most used features. Check you can find the on/off switch without even looking. Set the shutter speed and aperture on each and see which was easiest. Raise it to your eye and change focus points without shoving your thumb up your nostril (I'm a left-eye shooter!)!

    You will then know which camera to buy!

    All the best,

    Frank
    The destination is important, but so is the journey

  5. #15

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    With a grain of salt. I use a N80... Looking back, I wish I would have bought a used N90S and bought some clean primary lenses from KEH or something.... But, as it stands, its a nice camera. The AF system in dark spaces is a let down. It uses one of those little lights, then focuses. Very slow and sometimes it won't get there in time if at all. Starting out, pinching pennies, I bought 2 of the G lenses. One is a 28-70 and the other is a 70-300... They are plastic but they are also very light. God forbid you destroy one, but they are so cheap. Buy another... Its not the attitude to have going into it but its what I have and its what I am faced with. I also bought an 85 1.8, non G lenses. Of course, its my work horse for weddings and stuff and the others are great for travel and street shooting. I have the 4 AA battery grip for it, which makes it a little more substancial for my big hands. I am disappointed that it doesn't have the vertical shutter release button on it, which looks very unorthodox when using on my flash bracket. I don't know. I find the controls to be very easy. After 150 rolls, its certainly an extension of me. No looking, I know where everything is and I can change settings and make adjustments very quickly.

  6. #16

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    I'm in the market, and after handling these rigs, I've decided upon a used N90s, in fantastic condition. It'll accept my mf lenses, and I' already own a couple of high end Nikon flash units. I'll be picking it up Saturday. It's for my girlfriend, but maybe she'll allow me to use it from time to time. I still love and use my FM's, FE's and FE-2's, on a regular basis. I'm thinking of the Nikon 28-105 AF for it. Any suggestions?

    Kiron Kid

  7. #17
    FrankB's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Kiron Kid
    I'm thinking of the Nikon 28-105 AF for it. Any suggestions?
    Yup, I suggest you buy it!

    I have the same lens and refuse to be separated from it. The thing is pretty much worshipped on the Nikon user group site (Nikonians). Accept no substitute.
    The destination is important, but so is the journey

  8. #18

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    Frank B

    I've found my Kiron 28-105, to be a bit sharper and better built, but she needs an auto focus lens. I'm sure that the Nikon version will be more than adequate. Thanks to everyone for the advice.

    Kiron Kid

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