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  1. #11
    narsuitus's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Ara Ghajanian
    The last Nikon F3 I bought on eBay had the screen with the grid lines and not split screen (I forget the model number). I too thought it would be a pain, but now I like it, especially since it has the grid lines. In some cases I do prefer the split screen for accurate focusing.

    As a side note, I'm a bit near-sighted. Would a diopter help me or are they for people who are far-sighted?
    Ara
    1. The Nikon screen with the grid lines and the split image is the E screen. The R screen has the grid lines and the split image focusing aid.

    2. From what I understand, Nikon makes –3 to +2 diopters for the F3HP. This should cover both near-sighted and far-sighted people. However, unless you can actually try the diopter on your camera, it is not a simple task trying to calculate exactly which diopter will correct you particular vision problem. I use a +1.75 diopter reading glasses so I figured that a +2 diopter should help me. Wrong! The +2 diopter that I ordered made things much worse.

  2. #12
    benjiboy's Avatar
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    The screen usual goes black when using lenses with fairly small aperture, if you move your eye a little around the viewfinder it should make it go back to normal.

  3. #13
    benjiboy's Avatar
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    Eyesight correction

    Quote Originally Posted by narsuitus
    1. The Nikon screen with the grid lines and the split image is the E screen. The R screen has the grid lines and the split image focusing aid.

    2. From what I understand, Nikon makes –3 to +2 diopters for the F3HP. This should cover both near-sighted and far-sighted people. However, unless you can actually try the diopter on your camera, it is not a simple task trying to calculate exactly which diopter will correct you particular vision problem. I use a +1.75 diopter reading glasses so I figured that a +2 diopter should help me. Wrong! The +2 diopter that I ordered made things much worse.
    Getting things in focus with an SLR is a nightmare if your vision is faulty, because the whole system depends on the user having perfect eyesight, so in some cases a split image might be apparently in focus in the viewfinder, but out of focus on the film . Eyesight correction lenses can help sometimes depending on what defect the person has ( I have astigmatism and find that a correction lens is fine in the horizontal format, but as soon as I turn the camera into the vertical format the viewfinder image goes out of focus ) I find personally the best option is to wear glasses. You mention in your post the Nikon F3 HP which has the high eyepoint viewfinder, you should't have any problem seeing the whole screen with glasses with this model.

  4. #14
    Jon Goodman's Avatar
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    I prefer the split dot screen, however I've found the fastest SLR to focus is a Zenit E. It has a plain ground glass focus screen, and reminds me of an old style TV picture tube. When you see the image clearly, you're set, and Zenit has made their screen more workable than most. As for declining vision and these screens, I think part of the problem is in loss of close vision. When we were younger, we could focus objects from close to infinity more easily. Now that we're not so young, we can't do that. The plain ground glass screen requires that your eye sees close images well, whereas the split dot works differently. Here is a bonus: for those of you who use "monovision" (and the list includes millions of people), use your weak eye to focus and your dominant eye to frame. This trick also works fine with rangefinders (whose bright spot also requires good "close focus").
    Jon

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