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  1. #1

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    Mamiya 1000 35mm camera-- your thoughts please

    Okay. So it may seem a little too late asking everyone what they think of the mamiya 35mm-- seeing how i already purchased one on ebay. So, now that i have it what is everyone's thoughts about this line of camera. i know they have excellent MF (or so i hear) so i thought the 35mm should be good.

  2. #2

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    Hi,
    You don't specify the model you have, but I remember seeing the Mamiya Sekor something-or-other 1000 model for sale in the 1970's / 1980's. I can't say I've ever heard anything good or bad about them, but they always seemed to hang around for a long time in the used equipment shops compared to Pentax Spotmatics, Minolta SRTs, etc.. As you say, Mamiya have a good reputation in MF and so my feeling was that the slow movement of their 35mm SLRs was probably due to their being physically rather large and bulky compared to the opposition. Perhaps this lack of miniaturisation was good from the point of view of longevity and reliability.
    Anyway, I look forward to hearing how you get on with the camera.
    Best wishes,
    Steve

  3. #3

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    I have a MSX 1000. The body isn't anything special but the lenses are very nice. Considering they're all M42 lenses that means they fit any M42 body. I really like the 135mm I have.

  4. #4

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    The MSX uses the basic 42mm mount, but the MSX lens have an additional coupling that allows the MSX body to meter wide open with the MSX bodies, or stop down with any other camera and the MSX bodies will work in stop metering with any 42mm lens. The other 1000 and 500 are basic bodies, meters in stop down mode. Some models have both spot and center average metering. The Mamiya lens are very sharp. If the meter is working it is a good basic body for 42mm lens.

  5. #5

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    I bought a Mamiya 1000DTL when they first came out. I really liked this camera. The DTL stands for Dual Thru the Lens metering which allows for either spot or averaging metering. The 1000 TL model has only spot metering. The lenses for the 35mm cameras are very good.

  6. #6
    Seele's Avatar
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    Mamiya made some very interesting and capable 35mm SLR cameras, but there had been many false-starts and dead-end designs that the company could not follow through.

    With the benefit of hindsight, I feel that the DSX models with mechanical shutter, M42 lens mount, and stop-down metering would be the sensible choice; the reliability is very good indeed. Many, if not all the lenses for these cameras were made by Tokina, and are surprisingly good. A friend had a 35mm/2.8 and it was giving his Summicron a good run for its money.

    Later on Mamiya also made the NC series with a model called NC1000S, and employed extensive electronics and a unique lens mount, that did not work very well. The swansong was the ZE series and that did not work very well either. If you go to the Mamiya headquarter site you will not find any mention of its career in 35mm cameras, that might say something.

  7. #7

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    The model is a Mamiya Sekor 1000 DTL. What exactly does spot or averaging metering mean? Sorry if that seems to be a stupid question. but i'm still learning.

  8. #8
    titrisol's Avatar
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    The 1000 DTL was a very interesting camera, I had my dad's spotmatic and a friend had the DTL1000.
    We used to swap lenses among them and get excellent results.

    Spot metering means that the camera reads the light in a very small area of the picutre (thus a spot) and allows you to expose for such partiucular spot.
    Average metering measn that the camera reads the light in the whole scene and gives you an avergae reading (normally with rpeference for the center of the image) of the image.
    Mama took my APX away.....

  9. #9

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    Quote Originally Posted by hanaa
    The model is a Mamiya Sekor 1000 DTL. What exactly does spot or averaging metering mean? Sorry if that seems to be a stupid question. but i'm still learning.
    Spot metering means that only a small portion of the frame is metered. This portion is within the marked brackets at the bottom of the view finder. You meter on the main subject and then recompose the frame before taking the picture. In averaging mode all the frame is metered. Averaging can cause problems with backlighted subjects or scenes with lots of sky. In such cases spot metering is better.

  10. #10

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    Mamiya made very good 35mm cameras,but, the company never considered them their prime product and did a very poor job of promoting them. By the way, everyone knows that the Nikon FM10 is made for Nikon by Cosina. Did you know the Nikkorex was made for Nikon by Mamiya? They also sold it to Ricoh where it was known as the Singlex, and to Sears but I don't remember Sear's name for it, I think it was the TLS. All three were in Nikon F mount.

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