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  1. #11
    joeyk49's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Flotsam
    I save my Efke and JandC cassettes and clean the felt well between uses, a post-it note is just tacky enough to grab dust and grit without tearing up the felt.
    Gotta love those $1.50 35 exp rolls of Tri-X.
    I like it! Post It notes! Now I don't even have to get up from my desk to retrieve the masking tape! ...And, your right; if your not careful, serious masking tape will tear up the felt...

    Glad to see I'm not the only cheap guy here! How's $0.50 - .60 (estimated) per roll of PanF? I got a sweet deal on some recently expired stuff (150 ft) on Ebay last year...

  2. #12
    narsuitus's Avatar
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    The Nikon AM-1 cassettes I use in my F2 can be used indefinitely because they do not have the felt-lined slit that conventional cassettes use.

  3. #13

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    Quote Originally Posted by narsuitus
    The Nikon AM-1 cassettes I use in my F2 can be used indefinitely because they do not have the felt-lined slit that conventional cassettes use.
    I just did an eBay search and found two up for auction. Am I correct in interpreting the photo that they've got a two-part outer wall with an opening that forms a "door" when they're appropriately rotated, and that this rotation must be done by the camera, so they'll only work in certain cameras?

  4. #14
    narsuitus's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by srs5694
    I just did an eBay search and found two up for auction. Am I correct in interpreting the photo that they've got a two-part outer wall with an opening that forms a "door" when they're appropriately rotated, and that this rotation must be done by the camera, so they'll only work in certain cameras?
    Yes, the AM-1 only works in the Nikon F2. There is another one that works only in the Nikon F. There is a third one that works only in the Nikon rangefinder. I don't think Nikon made any other 36-exposure size cassettes for their other SLR cameras.

    Yes, your description of how they operate is accurate.

  5. #15
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    Quote Originally Posted by srs5694
    Alternatively, if you don't shoot enough non-bulk film to supply yourself, you can get empties from the local 1-hour photofinisher. (Some will be weird things taken from single-use cameras, which can be interesting.) To reload these cartridges, rather than attach the film to the spool, you've got to attach your film to the stub of film that sticks out of the cartridge. Use cellophane tape to cover the entire area of attachment, on both sides.
    So you can just go into your local film lab and ask for the empties and they'll give them to? I know my college photo club does that but I didn't know anyone could do that. Amazing that they don't freak at a request to take their garbage. I'll have to try that myself.

    And of course, cracking the DX code is necessary, especially if you want 25 ISO cartridges (easy convert from a 200)

  6. #16
    Lee L's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Flotsam
    At 70 cents a pop, buying new cassettes really eats up a lot of the economy of bulk loading. I save my Efke and JandC cassettes and clean the felt well between uses, a post-it note is just tacky enough to grab dust and grit without tearing up the felt.
    Gotta love those $1.50 35 exp rolls of Tri-X.
    We just need to find someone who markets a die to cut the film to the shape that retains it in the Efke spools, i.e. the center tongue with the hole in it.

    Lee

    (It's about time that film mfgrs recognized the popularity of tongue piercing.)

  7. #17

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    Quote Originally Posted by battra92
    So you can just go into your local film lab and ask for the empties and they'll give them to?
    I've only done it once (at a local Walgreens), but they forked them over without any big hassle. (The clerk did ask why I wanted them, but it was clearly personal curiosity and not a store policy sort of question.) I recommend buying something when you do this, just to be polite about taking up the clerk's time with your unusual request.

    And of course, cracking the DX code is necessary, especially if you want 25 ISO cartridges (easy convert from a 200)
    That depends on your camera(s). Quite a few Web pages detail DX codes, like these:

    http://www.geocities.com/Yosemite/2131/dx-code.html
    http://www.bythom.com/dxcodes.htm

    If you require DX-coded cartridges, ask for them specifically, ideally in the speed you need. (ISO 25 and 50 are going to be pretty rare, of course. My guess is most would be 200 or 400.) When I got my load from Walgreens, about half were from single-use cameras. Those aren't DX coded, although some seemed to be re-used (or at least re-labelled) cartridges, and the stickers could be peeled off to reveal DX codes.

    In theory, you should be able to change a DX code by scraping off paint or covering up bare metal. I've not tried this, myself.

  8. #18
    Dave Parker's Avatar
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    You can get DX code stickers from Porters Cameras, they sell them in various speeds, if you have a local lab that processes E-6 film, it is pretty easy to find ISO 50 DX encoded empties from fuji velivia film, I have hundreds if not thousands of them in a box here.

    The reason you find what seem to be re-used cartridges in the single use cameras is kodak used to have a cartridge re-cycle program, we used to save all of our cartridges and send them to kodak and they paid us like 3 cents each for them, then they were reloaded and put into the single use cameras, there are also many companies around that recycle the single use camera bodies and reload them and sell them under store brands.

    Dave

  9. #19

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    I employ both methods mentioned in the previous posts.
    I have stick on labels from Porters as Dave stated. Use them with my DX reading T-4 and Muji II. {I save those canisters by loading my developing reel directly from the UNOPENED cassette}. As a side note: When I ordered via phone the kind sales lady asked me if I would like their catalog.Why not eh? Man oh man,it weighed a ton and I had to pay Canada Post $13.00.
    Srs5694 spoke of the cassettes tossed by 1hr. photo labs. I get mine from the local camera shop who are used to dealing with student ie.poor analogers. Actually it was one of their tec. people who told me that she used the method when she was a student. Heres my methodology: I use good quality scotch tape and attach the bottom leader of the cassette to my bulk film. Then affix the top. Work the thumb and forefinger over the taped ares to get a good bond. Gently run the attached pieces into the cassette then load as usual.
    One note of caution. On two occasions the film has become detached from the leader when the last frame was taken and the cameras motor drive pulled the pieces apart. To solve this possible dilemma I carry a small film changing bag if I plan on venturing far from my darkroom.

    Mike

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