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  1. #1

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    what old SLR should i buy?

    tomorrow ill go to a photo market and i want to buy some old slr. can u tell me what manufacturer or model is the best. i dont have a lot money to spend also.
    thanks in advance for ur answers

  2. #2
    Andy K's Avatar
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    I can only speak from my own experience.
    My first SLR was a Zenit E. very capable, cheap and built like a tank! Next I got a Zenit TTL, similar to the Zenit E, same lens fitting etc.

    Then I was given a Praktica BX20 (I still use it now and then) it can be had relatively cheaply. Good quality and a good range of lenses.

    Then I got an Olympus OM-10 these also go very cheap. For a little more you might get an Olympus OM-1. Both use the same great range of lenses.

    Any of these are a good choice for a first SLR. Others may have other suggestions, but I would recommend an all manual control SLR so you learn the basics of photography as you use the camera.


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  3. #3
    Dave Parker's Avatar
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    If I was you, on a limited budget I would look at the Minolta SR series of cameras built like a tank, inexpensive lenses that are really high quality, of course the Olympus OM series are great cameras as well, I find the older Canons and Nikons to be a little more expensive, but still built like tanks...I always reccomend the Minolta SR series because I have shot several of them over the years in my work and play and never once had one let me down.

    Dave

  4. #4
    Paul Sorensen's Avatar
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    There are good products from all of the major manufacturers and other companies as well. I recommend getting something that was a very respected camera at the time and constructed with some durability. If you get an older totally consumer camera I think you are asking for more trouble. My personal experience is with Pentax, Olympus, and Nikon so I will stick with those. Others will be able to chime in about the good choices from Minolta and Canon.

    I think that the Pentax MX or K1000 are good choices. Both are manual exposure and there are a bunch of good lenses to choose from. The K1000 is more of a student camera and lacks some of the features of the MX and is also larger. The MX is very compact and is a full system camera with motor drives, backs and other accessories available. Both seem to be very reliable.

    As for Nikons, there are many choices, but I will mention the FM and FE series of cameras. These are excellent and were used as backups and even primary bodies by pros in their era. The FM and FM2 are manual and mechanical cameras. The FM2 has a newer shutter with faser sync speed and top speed. The FE and FE2 are aperture preferred auto cameras that require a battery for the shutter to operate, except that the FE2 has one speed at which the camera may be fired with no battery. The FE2 has the faster shutter and also adds TTL flash metering. The lenses for the Nikon are also incredible, of course. My experience is that they tend to be a but pricier than other brands, but in this day and age, they are definately affordable.

    The Olympus OM1 and OM2 cameras would also be good choices. They are very compact and have a wonderful line of compact lenses. The OM1 is mechanical and manual whereas the OM2 is electronic and has aperture preferred automatic exposure. I would suggest looking at the newer versions of these cameras, the OM1n and OM2n. I would probably suggest not looking at the OM2Sp, because it is a very different camera with more potential reliability problems.

    Have fun and good luck!

  5. #5

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    Quote Originally Posted by Paul Sorensen
    I would probably suggest not looking at the OM2Sp, because it is a very different camera with more potential reliability problems.
    and eats batteries.

    David.

  6. #6

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    For a good and simple manual SLR (assuming, that's what the original poster has in mind), I would look at the Minolta SRT's (solid, cheap, good lenses [Rokkors] available everywhere), the Nikon FM's (solid, maybe not quite as cheap), and the Olympus OM series (again solid, a tad more expensive maybe). These are the ones I have had experience with; there are many more good camera makes and models out there (the Pentax K1000 is almost a cult) and there really isn't one which is "best". It all comes down to what the poster feels happy with and can afford. Now if you find a cheap Nikon F2 ...

    Cheers,
    Chris
    [SIZE=1]Tiptoeing through life's grand theater - and falling down flat.[/SIZE]

  7. #7

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    aweek or 2ago an apugger was selling a metal-body k1000 and lens for not too much $$. -pentax optics are nice and the k1000 lasts 4-eva ... i've had mine since 81 or so and never hada problem ...

  8. #8
    dschneller's Avatar
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    I'll second the Pentax line, k1000 if you want a bayonet mount of the Spotmatics for the M42 screw mounts. They are built to last, won't eat up batteries and there are a large number of used lenses.

    Dave
    "...slow down and start using photography to create an image, not just capture one." b.e.wilson

    "Speed kills, Del" Johnny Fever

  9. #9

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    nikkormat

    Nikkormats are cheap. FT2s and FT3s are newer than the original and are well built. With non-Ai lenses like inexpensive 50mm F2, you're set.

  10. #10

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    Gee there's so many ways to go that it will be mind boggleing; And then on top of it you'll have everyones own personal preferences that will confuse you even more. They all have merit; The problem is your going to a photo market, where all kinds of crap can show up in the form of cameras with problems. Not a good thing, cause getting some cameras repaired can cost more then what their worth. At least get a return policy. If they won't give one, go to the next table.

    By now you should have investigated somewhat the features of different cameras, or at least compared ones you've seen to others. Maybe a friend had a Nikon, Canon, Minolta Or Olympus you've handled and were somewhat taken with it. Go from there and research the camera online, and make a determination after checking Ebay as to what is available, lenses and accessories and check the backtalk as to what people have said about the camera in various forums. It will be in the forums where you will find the problems with any particular brand and model.

    Each brand has cameras that were good or bad in someway. Research is what it is all about. Don't make a mistake without arming yourself with knowledge; And don't be in a hurry. Ebay can be just as cheap as a photo fair.

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