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  1. #31

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    Use it for Instamatic 126 !!
    - Bill Lynch

  2. #32
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    Quote Originally Posted by wblynch View Post
    Use it for Instamatic 126 !!
    As you well know, that's what I do! I'm reloading Kodak Gen 2 (Portra 160NC) and Rollei Retro 400S in my 126 cartridges (Solaris 200 and Kodak Verichrome Pan). So far, so good. The backing paper is the part that will wear out first, once I use mine all up I'll be trying some cut down 120 paper...

    That said, I hadn't heard about the EOS 10s working with unperforated film. That is quite interesting...
    Harry Pulley - Visit the BLIND PRINT EXCHANGE FORUM

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  3. #33

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    After the sprocket wheel punches holes through the film, there is the matter of later trying to rewind the film back into the canister. As well, there might be bits of film floating around the camera, getting into the shutter, jamming it, etc.

    In the end, this is one of those things that doesn't seem worth the effort. There are still so many good film available that it doesn't seem worth the effort.

    Just like trying to squeeze and extra frame or two from each roll.

  4. #34
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    With 126 there is no punching of holes. 126 film normally has a single sprocket hole per frame but if you snip or grind off the finger, which I did on my Kodak Instamatic 500, then it will shoot fine without any sprocket holes! I'm not sure this works on all bodies but on the 500 this works great (my childhood X-15F I'm not mutilating to try it out but my 500 is a beater missing the name plate and leatherette so I had no qualms about defacing it). This is great as trying to hand punch holes is a major PITA. It is then about 1.5 winds per shot (or two full winds and you get 16 shots on a 24 roll) and I find if I use 1/500 f/22 for the shot in between and hold the lens against my sleeve then there is almost no light leakage (if I had a lens cap I'd try that).

    Does the EOS 10s/10QD punch holes or just not use the sprocket? If it punches holes then forget it, I'll just continue to reload my cartridges for my nice old Instamatic.
    Harry Pulley - Visit the BLIND PRINT EXCHANGE FORUM

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  5. #35
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    Quote Originally Posted by Kino View Post
    If you know someone with a Leo Catozzo 35mm polyester tape splicer for motion picture film, have impossible patience and can work in total darkness, you COULD perforate it yourself. The Catozzo is a guillotine type splicer that punches the sprocket holes out of an unperforated bandage of clear polyester tape laid across a join of a butt-splice. It certainly will NOT be pretty, but it should allow the film to transport well enough to test a roll.

    A trip to the local multiplex cinema should produced said device, provided you can cajole them into parting with it for a brief period.

    Of course, they will think you mad as a Hatter, but if you are like me, that's just par for the course...
    I have tried punching through film with a 35mm tabletop splicer and it's not easy.

    Tabletop splicers aren't made to handle this kind of job. They punch through tape easily but they won't go through film very well at all. Even the venerable Neumade 35-SS would BARELY be able to do a few punches and you would probably end up breaking the handle off if you didn't damage the punch matrix first.

    You'd never get though a whole roll of 36 exposures before you either broke the splicer or gave up trying... Not to mention punching several rolls of film.
    Randy S.

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  6. #36
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    Quote Originally Posted by Nano_Burger View Post
    I've also wanted to use unperforated film in a 35mm camera. I've modified a few by wrapping electrical tape around the toothed spindle until the it becomes a friction drive instead of a sprocket drive. Will work, but you have to put up with non-standard spacing which sucks for scanning. Anyway, the best way is to get a EOS 10s or EOS 10qt. It does not require sprocket holes for film positioning and will give you very nicly spaced exposures. Currently (2011), these bodies go for less than peanuts on eBay. I got 1 for $20 and one recently for $1. Shipping is on top of that, but still very good for a great advanced camera body. However, a deteriorating bumper in the camera causes the infamous tar on the shutter blades. Can be cleaned easily enough with napthea. Just thought I'd share this for the good of the community.
    It sounds like you know what you're doing but are you sure the 10s works with unperforated film? While it is a sprocketless drive I read that it uses an IR LED to count sprocket holes for frame spacing. How does that work if there are no holes???
    Harry Pulley - Visit the BLIND PRINT EXCHANGE FORUM

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  7. #37

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    Just thought I would throw in my findings...

    I have been on the hunt for a way to shoot unperf as well. I have picked up an assortment of old Canon EOS film bodies. It seems like all the best bodies I have also have the little IR "eye" that registers the sprocket holes for frame spacing. (at first glance the misc Elan II and IIe seem to work, but they also have the sensor). Even though they will transport the film, I haven't been successful in getting consistently usable negs. However, I finally did find one model of Rebel that seems to be the perfect fit. I will have to look to refresh my memory as to the exact model and report back. I am sure there has to be a whole series of these bodies that uses the same method of transport.

    What to look for is this: The film path has no gearing for sprockets. The channel on the back of the camera does not have a little shiny black square in the path where the sprocket holes pass. The most important feature is that the camera has a driven nub that fits into the bottom of the 35mm cassette. Upon loading a roll of film, the entire roll is unwound onto the takeup spool on the right hand side of the camera. Then, as each exposure is taken the film rewinds into the cassette. After 24 or 36 exposures (whatever type of roll you loaded) the film is ready to be ejected. You don't have to wait for the reel to rewind. I can't tell exactly how the camera is registering the width of each frame, but I presume the drive mechanism is somehow turning at a prescribed rate for each film advance.

    For anyone who does not know, the problem in an unregistered winding scheme, is that the width of both sides spool changes depending on how full the spool is wound with film. Basically the angle of rotation is not constant and could translate to either a series of frames with increasing dead space between frames or possibly the opposite, if the frames don't get advanced far enough you could have overlap. The only method I could conceive for this particular camera is to somehow automatically calibrate the advance rotations by virtue of completely transferring the whole unexposed roll at the beginning of the process. I also considered some method that tracks the relative rotation for both spools instantaneously and correlates that to a linear distance of film travel.

  8. #38

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    with unlimited supplies of sprocketed 35mm film available I fail to see the interest in fitting that square peg into the round hole...
    - Bill Lynch

  9. #39

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    Quote Originally Posted by wblynch View Post
    with unlimited supplies of sprocketed 35mm film available
    Well, for example perfectly good NP APX100 is available here in the Europe for ca US$7 per 100ft roll.

  10. #40

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    I would love to get one of those 100ft rolls -- for my Instamatic !!

    Where do I sign?
    - Bill Lynch

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