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  1. #1
    htmlguru4242's Avatar
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    Unperforated film with 35mm SLR

    I've been wanting to try to use some microfilm or other odd films in my Canon AE-1, though most, if not all of these films are unperforated.

    Is it possible to use unperforated film in a 35mm camera?

  2. #2
    Max Power's Avatar
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    FWIW, I don't see how it could possibly work seeing that most if not all 'regular' 35mm cameras actually use the sprocket holes to advance the film. If you could figure out how to advance the film like a MF camera, you might be able to do it.

    Kent
    Max Power, he's the man who's name you'd love to touch! But you mustn't touch! His name sounds good in your ear, but when you say it, you mustn't fear! 'Cause his name can be said by anyone!

  3. #3
    donbga's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by htmlguru4242
    I've been wanting to try to use some microfilm or other odd films in my Canon AE-1, though most, if not all of these films are unperforated.

    Is it possible to use unperforated film in a 35mm camera?
    Simply put, it won't work.

    Don Bryant

  4. #4

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    If you know someone with a Leo Catozzo 35mm polyester tape splicer for motion picture film, have impossible patience and can work in total darkness, you COULD perforate it yourself. The Catozzo is a guillotine type splicer that punches the sprocket holes out of an unperforated bandage of clear polyester tape laid across a join of a butt-splice. It certainly will NOT be pretty, but it should allow the film to transport well enough to test a roll.

    A trip to the local multiplex cinema should produced said device, provided you can cajole them into parting with it for a brief period.

    Of course, they will think you mad as a Hatter, but if you are like me, that's just par for the course...

  5. #5
    mfobrien's Avatar
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    remember, I have a bunch of microfilm stuff for you!
    Mark O'Brien -
    At the home of Argus cameras...Ann Arbor, MI
    http://www.geocities.com/argusmaniac/

  6. #6
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    A few times in my career with 35mm motion picture we have had film go off track and the camera has punched its own set of sprocket holes... before it jammed. It might be possible to run 35mm sprocket-hole-less film in a still camera, and let the sprocket teeth simply claw into the film. It might work in one kind if camera, it might not in another, and it could, very possibly, cause damage to a camera. That being said, I wouldn't hesitate to try it in a beater.

  7. #7

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    Some MF cameras take 35mm film. I wonder if the TLRs adapters for 35mm might handle it.

    Which gone format was unpeforated 35mm? 126?

  8. #8
    JBrunner's Avatar
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    Nick is right, That would be the best way to do it. I have done it in a holga, for example.

  9. #9

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    Quote Originally Posted by Nick Zentena
    Which gone format was unpeforated 35mm? 126?
    126 was close and was 35mm width. It still had a hole along the bottom which the camera used to align the film for the next frame. It might be an option if you could force a 126 camera to cock the shutter and you were able to guess by winding where the next frame would be. Frame size was 28mmx28mm. Of course assuming you can modify the camera finding and getting the film into one of those 126 cartridges might make for some fun times.

    Roger.

  10. #10

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    FWIW, my Ricoh XR-X 3PF has no sprockets; it seems to wind film by pulling on the take-up spool alone. I can't guarantee that it doesn't use the film's sprocket holes, though; it's conceivable it's got some sort of sensor that uses sprocket holes to count out the frame width. If you've already got the film, I'd be happy to give it a try if you send me a roll. If it works, you could then look for a Ricoh on eBay.

    As to the idea of using a camera to punch its own holes, some of the Soviet cameras have heavy-duty metal sprockets. They'd probably have a good chance of successfully biting through the film. Most newer Japanese cameras I've seen have softer plastic sprockets that I would guess would just dent the film.

    Of course, the film advance in most 35mm cameras is done partly via the sprockets and partly via the mechanical force from the take-up spool. I don't know how much cameras vary in terms of which of these is the more important factor.

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