Switch to English Language Passer en langue française Omschakelen naar Nederlandse Taal Wechseln Sie zu deutschen Sprache Passa alla lingua italiana
Members: 70,965   Posts: 1,558,396   Online: 823
      

View Poll Results: If you are going to shoot a subject that you know you will want to make larger prints

Voters
92. You may not vote on this poll
  • I always use a tripod

    49 53.26%
  • Depending on speed

    32 34.78%
  • Not often

    11 11.96%
Page 2 of 4 FirstFirst 1234 LastLast
Results 11 to 20 of 40
  1. #11
    bobfowler's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2003
    Location
    New Jersey, Land of the Living Dead
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    1,440
    Images
    19
    Quote Originally Posted by David A. Goldfarb
    To me it depends on the subject and the shooting situation. If the subject is static, I tend to use a tripod and the largest camera that is practical. If the situation does not permit a tripod either for pragmatic or legal reasons, then I shoot handheld and use the largest camera that is practical.
    I couldn't have said it better...
    Bob Fowler
    fowler@verizon.net
    Some people are like Slinkies. They're really good for nothing, but they still bring a smile to your face when you push them down a flight of stairs.

  2. #12
    Travis Nunn's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2005
    Location
    Henrico, Virginia USA
    Shooter
    Medium Format
    Posts
    1,604
    Images
    32
    I always use a tripod, except when I'm unable to carry a tripod for whatever reason. If I can't bring a tripod, I'll try to figure another way of support (tree stump, limb, rock or whatever fits the situation.)

    I used to never use a tripod because I hated carrying it around, but a friend of mine convinced me to start and my shots have been so much better since.
    ____________________________________________
    Searching my way to perplexion

  3. #13
    JBrunner's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2005
    Shooter
    35mm
    Posts
    6,781
    I use a tripod whenever I can. If I can't, I try to follow focal length=slowest recommended shutter speed formula, which will deliver "acceptable" sharpness in most situations. Acceptable sharpness is of course subjective.

  4. #14

    Join Date
    Mar 2005
    Location
    Southern California
    Shooter
    4x5 Format
    Posts
    659
    The only shooting I would do without a tripod would be candid snaps and the like. It's one of the most difficult things to get a beginning photographer to do- use a tripod! It's like the last piece of equipment they would ever want to buy. The best glass and finest films are all for naught–if the image is blurred on account of "camera shake"!

    That being said, however.....

    There is the age-old rule that dictates that the shutter speed should be at least twice as fast as the focal length of the lens if you want to hand hold the camera.
    "A certain amount of contempt for the material employed to express an idea is indispensable to the purest realization of this idea." Man Ray

  5. #15
    JBrunner's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2005
    Shooter
    35mm
    Posts
    6,781
    Quote Originally Posted by Changeling1
    There is the age-old rule that dictates that the shutter speed should be at least twice as fast as the focal length of the lens if you want to hand hold the camera.
    Would that be twice, or four times as sharp as my suggestion?

  6. #16
    jimgalli's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2002
    Location
    Tonopah Nevada
    Shooter
    ULarge Format
    Posts
    3,404
    Blog Entries
    2
    Images
    155
    I have 20X30" prints on permanent display that were made with a Nikon FE, 35-70 f3.5-4.5AF (cheap) lens and a Bogen tripod. 20X enlargements. Sadly, all the Nikon's are gone at this point. My daughter's using up the last FM. To this day I won't sell the 300mm f4AF. Such a gorgeous lens.
    He is no fool who gives what he cannot keep..to gain that which he cannot lose. Jim Elliot, 1949

    http://tonopahpictures.0catch.com

  7. #17
    BWGirl's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2004
    Location
    Wisconsin, USA
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    3,050
    Images
    18
    Well, I had always been a reluctant tripod user until I started shooting waterfalls. That sort of took care of that bad habit!

    I still have to slow my attention-deficit self down, so there are times when I am irritated at having to use the tripod... but the best shots I've taken have been from a camera on a tripod.

    I'm with Claire... best one you can get & still carry.
    Jeanette
    .................................................. ................
    Isaiah 25:1

  8. #18
    Curt's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2005
    Location
    Pacific Northwest
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    4,553
    Images
    15
    I use one whenever (sp)I am able to. I hand held whenever I have to.

  9. #19
    Donald Qualls's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2005
    Location
    North Carolina, USA (transplanted from Seattle)
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    1,845
    If I expect I'll want larger prints, I use a tripod -- under a bigger camera. After getting hooked on 6x9 cm, it's just hard to think about making a print bigger than 8x10 from 35 mm. Yes, I shoot 35 mm -- I'm just about to send my Spotmatic off for its first CLA in 40 years, and I've got 4 other active full frame, and one half frame camera -- but I don't shoot 35 mm for anything I can set up and plan, in general.

    So, relative to 35 mm, I don't use a tripod much (unless doing macro with my Spottie), but have no expectation of making large prints.
    Photography has always fascinated me -- as a child, simply for the magic of capturing an image onto glossy paper with a little box, but as an adult because of the unique juxtaposition of science and art -- the physics of optics, the mechanics of the camera, the chemistry of film and developer, alongside the art in seeing, composing, exposing, processing and printing.

  10. #20

    Join Date
    Dec 2003
    Posts
    527
    Images
    11
    When I was a kid I could hold a Leica steady at 1/4 second, but when I turned 50, I started losing about 10% of my shots from camera shake (shooting Kodachrome 25, usually at f:8 for maximum lens sharpness). As a test, I spent 3 weeks on Cape Cod and used a tripod for every shot -- the slides were needle sharp, but the images sucked compared to my usual spontaneous pictures. So I switched to faster films, started shooting at higher shutter speeds, and frequently carry a small tripod (which I never use). OTOH, I always use a large, heavy Linhof tripod for my 4x5 monorail.

Page 2 of 4 FirstFirst 1234 LastLast


 

APUG PARTNERS EQUALLY FUNDING OUR COMMUNITY:



Contact Us  |  Support Us!  |  Advertise  |  Site Terms  |  Archive  —   Search  |  Mobile Device Access  |  RSS  |  Facebook  |  Linkedin