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  1. #21

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    Quote Originally Posted by Stargazer
    To be completely accurate, mine's an FM2n aswell.

    Do you have an 85mm Nikon lens? If so, I wonder which one.
    I'm wondering whether it's worth the increase expense of getting a 9-element lens. I'm not sure about this, as bokeh isn't generally a problem. Sorry, this is a bit of an aside, but isn't really as for me it's all part of the question of what to spend the money on.
    Sorry, no. I bought my first Nikon, an Nikkormat FTN, when I was younger and more easily influenced. It came with a nice little brochure on photography that made the point that a reasonable lens collection would have focal lengths in steps of 2x. My current set of lenses for my Nikons runs 24, 55, 105, 200, 400, 700; with a 35-70 and 50 thrown in to add confusion. Plus a 75-200 bought for a cine project -- it wasn't good enough -- that I never use. Two third-party lenses, the 400 and 700, the rest Nikkors. I had a 35/2 Nikkor for a while. After it was stolen I replaced it with the 35-70; the alternative was an Olympus XA.

    Funny, when I buy lenses -- more for my Graphics these days than for my Nikons -- I don't think much about how many elements they have.

  2. #22
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    Stargazer,

    DDR-made B-series lenses tend to have their country of origin marked around the barrel just behind the aperture ring. To make it easier for you to identify them here are two pages for your reference:

    28/2.8

    135/2.8

    It should be easy to find a Praktica B-series camera to take advantage of these lenses; try eBay, and I would tend to recommend the first-chassis type, especially the B200.

    For my money I can say that the German lenses tend to give a somewhat different "look" to the pictures compared to Japanese - especially Nikon lenses especially in the bokeh department.

    As far as I know there has not been any adapter made in commercial quantity for putting B-series lenses to cameras of different mount. However, a very small quantity of adapters were pretty much hand-made for putting these lenses on Canon manual-focus cameras, whose existance was known only to very few people: sort of whispers between trusted friends so to speak. I have one, and occasionally use it with my first-generation Canonflex. Of course all couplings are lost; part of the deal really.

  3. #23
    df cardwell's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Dan Fromm
    D

    df cardwell, you got it backwards. One of the great attractions of the Alpa SLR system, not to be confused with the current MF Alpas, is its extremely short register, which allows lenses from most other SLR systems to be used on Alpas.

    The best list of registers I've found so far is here: http://www.a1.nl/phomepag/markerink/mounts.htm If there's a better one available, will someone please post a link to it?
    Quite right. This is why I don't use a tablesaw late at night.

    Anyhow, an M42 lens doesn't focus to infinity on a Nikon. At least mine don't.

    thanks.. and the markerink list is great

    .
    "One of the painful things about our time is that those who feel certainty are stupid,
    and those with any imagination and understanding are filled with doubt and indecision"

    -Bertrand Russell

  4. #24
    df cardwell's Avatar
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    Stargazer:

    I have an 85/1.8 from... years past... and it is a fine lens.

    Björn Rörslett has nice things to say about it: I shoot people instead of rocks'ntrees, and it is a fine, fine, fine lens.

    .
    "One of the painful things about our time is that those who feel certainty are stupid,
    and those with any imagination and understanding are filled with doubt and indecision"

    -Bertrand Russell

  5. #25

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    Quote Originally Posted by df cardwell
    Stargazer:

    I have an 85/1.8 from... years past... and it is a fine lens.

    Björn Rörslett has nice things to say about it: I shoot people instead of rocks'ntrees, and it is a fine, fine, fine lens.

    .
    Hi there,

    I wonder if that would be a manual-only lens (I guess it would). These don't appear to be available new any more in 85mm...so it seems to be a question of putting autofocus lenses on manual mode, if buying new, or buying second-hand. Do you know anything about the f1.8 DAF ? It retails here for £298.49. I think it is 6 elements as opposed to 9, (which is the f1.4's)but as I said, I'm really not sure how much that matters for portraits (which is what I want it for).
    As I understand it the 9 elements is quite unique to Nikon, and is good for smooth bokeh, if that's crucial (but I might be wrong here).

  6. #26

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    Quote Originally Posted by Seele
    For my money I can say that the German lenses tend to give a somewhat different "look" to the pictures compared to Japanese - especially Nikon lenses especially in the bokeh department.
    Thanks for the helpful information - and I wonder if it's possible to say a bit about how exactly you think the "look" is different between the two systems? I know bokeh especially is a little subjective but I wonder how they differ? And in any other ways?

  7. #27

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    Quote Originally Posted by Soeren
    I have a 85mm lens the AFD 1,4 version.
    Björn Rörslett has revieved the nikors on his site

    http://www.naturfotograf.com/index2.html

    Regards Søren
    Have just seen your post and this link, thank you.

    BTW It seems from what you've all said that the lenses come from a Praktica B series camera (possibly BX20).

    Thanks for all the helpful info.

  8. #28
    Seele's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Stargazer
    Thanks for the helpful information - and I wonder if it's possible to say a bit about how exactly you think the "look" is different between the two systems? I know bokeh especially is a little subjective but I wonder how they differ? And in any other ways?
    Correction: the bokeh of a lens is absolutely objective as it is one of its inherent characteristics; whether you like its bokeh or not is subjective.

    I know I am going to be drawn and quartered by others, but since you are familiar with Nikon, I can say that I do not warm to Nikon lenses' bokeh as they have a tendency to transition very rapidly into complex bokeh; this is particularly obvious with long focus lenses, but Nikon is not as bad as Topcon in that respect. Meyer and Zeiss have smooth transitions and they tend to hold very well without breaking into complex bokeh; the Japanese family of lenses I can think of which is close to this appealing trait would be the manual focus Minoltas. While I can say I have subjective tastes, but I never seem to suffer from the imaging quality from my Meyer and Zeiss lenses, nor do my clients.

  9. #29

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    Quote Originally Posted by Seele
    Correction: the bokeh of a lens is absolutely objective as it is one of its inherent characteristics; whether you like its bokeh or not is subjective.
    That's what I meant

    Thanks Seele - I think maybe the only way is to decide for myself is to get a suitable body and try out the system, it sounds like it would be worth it in the end.

  10. #30
    Seele's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Stargazer
    That's what I meant

    Thanks Seele - I think maybe the only way is to decide for myself is to get a suitable body and try out the system, it sounds like it would be worth it in the end.
    Stargazer,

    At that website you can also find sample photographs taken with the lenses so they might give you some rough ideas too.

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