Switch to English Language Passer en langue française Omschakelen naar Nederlandse Taal Wechseln Sie zu deutschen Sprache Passa alla lingua italiana
Members: 71,930   Posts: 1,585,412   Online: 1052
      
Page 2 of 2 FirstFirst 12
Results 11 to 14 of 14
  1. #11

    Join Date
    Aug 2005
    Location
    NYC
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    413
    35mm is pretty rare for fashion. Not unheard of, but most of it is 645 or more likely 6x7. If it's film, that is, most of it is digital. When 35mm film is employed in editorial fashion, it's often b/c that's all the $300 a day budget allows for w/o the photographer going broke.

    I don't know anyone who shoot e-6 fashion anymore. Just digital or neg.

    But these are just my observations, and they're limited.

  2. #12

    Join Date
    Jan 2005
    Location
    Agua Dulce, CA
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    37
    From what I've seen a great number of professionals are using 35mm in all fields of photography. Yes, there are those in Fine Art using medium and large format, yes there are some still using medium format for weddings, but as film has become better in resolution and digital has become more advanced, not to mention quicker to publish, more and more photographers are utilizing the 35mm format.
    Personally, I have gone from shooting medium format at weddings to 35mm. The more traditional methods of doing wedding portraiture have given way a bit to the growing number of documentary style wedding photographers.
    This I think is largely due to the rise in fame and popularity of several photographic artists who have popularized the form by producing very beautiful artistic images using 35mm film and digital as their method of capture. There is an ease of use and mobility in the 35mm equipment that lends itself perfectly to documentary work.
    It is no wonder that for many decades wildlife photographers and photojournalists have been using 35mm for their fast moving and often unpredictable subjects.
    In a similar way, weddings contain some of the same elements such as fast moving subjects, ever changing lighting conditions, and a variety of areas of operations, especially in larger venues where fast mobility is essential.

    As with any format, it is the accuracy of exposure that contributes the most to the quality of the format. A perfectly exposed 35mm shot will yield a good resolution and create an acceptable print as well as anything.
    Now, the argument starts - is a larger format going to give you a superior enlargement? Well, technically yes. But, how many huge enlargements are you going to make for every type of image?
    Maybe in portraiture, if you have a possibilty of a large wall hanging photograph, you will have a nicer look with a larger format. But how big a picture will you need from a shot of a polar bear or guests dancing at a wedding reception, or your kid on a bicycle?

    Anyway, there are no rules at all as to which format a professional must choose. It is purely personal. The only circumstance is when the format is dictated specifically by a publication.

    There's my $.02 in the discussion.

    Lou

  3. #13

    Join Date
    Dec 2004
    Location
    Phoeinx Arizona
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    1,343
    I think Lou is very much on the money. When I started in the mid 60 in College 35 mm film quality had just gotten to the point that it was becoming acceptable for press use. I was loaned a TLR in college to use for the weekly paper, it took some doing to let the facility advisor let me use my Spotmatic. In today's world 35 mm is good enough for most work, for most commercial as I was told often "It just has to be good enough."

  4. #14
    Ara Ghajanian's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2004
    Location
    Providence, RI
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    368
    Images
    14
    Quote Originally Posted by Paul Howell
    I think Lou is very much on the money. When I started in the mid 60 in College 35 mm film quality had just gotten to the point that it was becoming acceptable for press use. I was loaned a TLR in college to use for the weekly paper, it took some doing to let the facility advisor let me use my Spotmatic. In today's world 35 mm is good enough for most work, for most commercial as I was told often "It just has to be good enough."
    In regards to Paul's point, you must remember that the offset printing industry has advanced considerably since the 60's. Presses register much more accurately. Paper stocks are much more advanced and retain color and detail better. Another thing to consider as far as magazines and catalogs are concerned is that film scanning technology has advanced also. Those 35mm images that didn't reproduce well in the old days are much sharper and have better color fidelity with today's scanners.
    Ara
    Just because you're not paranoid doesn't mean they're not out to get you.

Page 2 of 2 FirstFirst 12


 

APUG PARTNERS EQUALLY FUNDING OUR COMMUNITY:



Contact Us  |  Support Us!  |  Advertise  |  Site Terms  |  Archive  —   Search  |  Mobile Device Access  |  RSS  |  Facebook  |  Linkedin