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Thread: camera help

  1. #1

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    camera help

    well, i recently purchased a nikon em, very old... it takes nice pictures, but of course because it was made in 1979, not too many options. me being an amatuer photographer, i was wondering what cameras are good to go into film photography with. i mainly would like a nikon, but if there are others better for my purpose, that'd be good too. i've experimented with a canon k2, as said early the nikon em, and a canon rebel g. i'm not too sure about which camera to get.

    help would be greatly appreciated,
    thanks.

  2. #2
    Nicole's Avatar
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    Dear Alan, I wish I had the immediate right answer, but only you can do that. It's a bit like asking shall I take the red or the blue shoe. But what I can say is, if you can, try and hold a few cameras, put a roll of film through them, see if the ergonimics fits your hands and style. Personally I prefer less bells and whistles (less automatics) and just manual cameras. I get distracted by them or they just get in the way. But then again, that's a personal thing. I have Nikon gear which has served me very well but then again Canon is the favourite choice for others. Nikon vs Canon has been a never ending debate. Again, I suggest you try out different cameras and see which fit 'you' better, even if you hire them for half a day or so. Also, an expensive camera does not guarantee the best photographs.

    Now, if you hang around APUG for a while you'll soon find yourself upgrading from a 35mm SLR camera to a medium format 120mm camera, then to a large format and well, then why not the ultra large format!

    You're first investment may not be perfect forever as our needs, aspirations and know-how changes in time.

    Enjoy your photographic journey.

    Kindest regards, Nicole

  3. #3

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    Good Evening,

    I wouldn't worry so much about a particular brand or model as about the overall condition of what you select. I have consistently recommended that those relatively new to photography will learn the most and learn most quickly by using cameras which function totally manually and do not require a battery for anything except possibly a light meter. There's nothing wrong with having "automatic" features on a camera, but their use should neither be required nor normally relied on. (I once heard a comment to the effect that the best way to learn photography is to start with an 8 x 10!)

    Konical

  4. #4

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    I see what both of you are saying. That helps a lot.

    Thanks

  5. #5
    gnashings's Avatar
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    Make a list of what you will photograph, how often, etc. Then make a list of how involved you want to get (do you want to develop your own, etc.). See if you want auto-focus, or not. With that list in hand, google some cameras and see which ones fit the features you need (there is a good site photozone.de, that has side by side feature overviews of most SLR's). You will surely have some questions as to what does what and what some of the numbers mean - I am sure you will find answers here if you just ask. At that point, you will have a list of cameras that fit your needs. All that remains is scanning eBay, or KEH, to get an idea of prices. That will narrow your choices further as you see what fits your budget and what does not. Since you said you had a preference for Nikon (presumably because you already have some gear), that should make things even more simple. I think that's about as close to step by step as I can think of getting

    Peter.

  6. #6

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    That seems like a good idea. I guess I should probably go ahead and check out that website :-D

    Thanks for all the help

  7. #7

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    Some info on your EM and perhaps also some tips on getting the best of it.
    http://www.mir.com.my/rb/photography...0/em/index.htm
    Cheers Søren
    Send from my Electronic Data Management Device using TWOFingerTexting

    Technology distinquishable from magic is insufficiently developed

    Søren Nielsen
    Denmark

  8. #8

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    I am currently studying photography at art school, i have an old yashica fx but had trouble finding both yashica lens and carl ziess lenses in my city, i picked up a nikon FM-2 with motor drive, which i just love. The is a huge range of lenses within multiple shops in my city so finding lenses is not a problem, the first lens i picked up for it was an old japan ese made fixed 50mm f1.4 so far so good.

  9. #9
    gnashings's Avatar
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    I think the problem with the Em is that it really is kind of like the Canon T50 - a glorified point and shoot with the benefit of using world class lenses. You are the mercy of its auto exposure calculations (which apparently are not all that bad, form what I hear - but do not replace the lack of control), and you probably noticed that this kind of set up is limiting when trying to delve a little more into photography. They don't fetch much of a price, but are compact and reliable, so I would say keep it as a just incase back up if you plan to stick with Nikon (which is not a bad idea at all!).

  10. #10

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    Manual cameras are nice for learning the craft. However, most every 35mm photographer finds the need at some time for auto exposure. There is often not enough time for slow contemplative photography. Then such cameras as the EM are a welcome additions to any camera bag. As was pointed out it gives you access to a fine family of lenses. I would keep it and get another Nikon body.

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