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  1. #1
    bwlina's Avatar
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    Good lenses for Nikon FM

    I'm about to buy a Nikon FM. My first Nikon SLR. (Actually, my very first Nikon.) The camera comes with the 105/2.5 lens. Now, my question is: What other lenses should I look for? What are the classic manual focus Nikon lenses?

    I want a wide angle, 24, 28 or 35mm, and a more normal lens, 50, 55 or 85. What are the ones I shouldn't miss? I don't do zooms.

  2. #2
    Marco Gilardetti's Avatar
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    There seems to be general consensus on the fact that the 50mm f/1.8 is an all-times greatest lens (I can confirm).

    On the 28mm range, the f:2,8 is more expensive than others but it's great (has floating elements).

    I would skip the 85mm, if you already have a 105mm.
    I know a chap who does excellent portraits. The chap is a camera.
    (Tristan Tzara, 1922)

  3. #3

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    Don't get a Nikkor 24mm f/2.0. Never got sharp images with it.

    I'd get a Nikkor 28mm and a Nikkor 50mm. Sure you can get them cheap enough used.

    You don't need the 28mm f/1.4. The 50 f/1.4 is worth having if you have a few extra dollars, but the 1.8 is excellent.

    Some day down the road you can add a 20mm and a 200mm.

    My two cents.

  4. #4
    David H. Bebbington's Avatar
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    In my experience, Nikon lenses of the same age deliver very good and consistent performance. The choice of a wide angle is very much a matter of taste, my first choice of a lens after a 50 mm (like the f1.4 best) is a 24 mm, then comes a 35 mm (both of mine are f2.8 - obviously bigger apertures are vital if you're doing really low-light work, but they cost a lot more). Depending on your budget, Tamron lenses (particularly the SP series) can be worth a look, performance very good and available on e-bay and elsewhere for very little.

  5. #5

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    I'd look at a 24 f2.8, a 35 f2(the f2.5 Series E is also good, better than the Nikkor 2.8 IMHO) and a 50mm f1.8 or f2.

    My kit is currently the 100mm f2.8, 50mm f1.8 and 35mm f2.5 Series E's, and a Sigma 24mm f2.8 (Competent, but inferior to the Nikkor with CRC). I use these on an F3HP, FA, F601m and EM.

  6. #6
    jimgalli's Avatar
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    I have 2 20X30" color enlargements on permanent display that were made with the most ordinary and common Nikon 35-70 f3.3-4.5 AF. The one that came with a lot of 6006's and 8008's. It's a great lens.
    He is no fool who gives what he cannot keep..to gain that which he cannot lose. Jim Elliot, 1949

    http://tonopahpictures.0catch.com

  7. #7
    bobfowler's Avatar
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    I know you said you don't do zooms, but...

    The 50-135mm f/3.5 is killer, as is the 25-50mm f/4.

    For wides, I like the 24mm f/2.8, 28mm f/2.8 (the AIs is better than the AI version). I don't use my 35mm f/2.8 very often, but it's not bad. I love my 17mm f/3.5 Tokina, even though it's not made by Nikon.

    Going longer, the 50mm f/1.8 (not the "E") is excellent. Ditto the 85mm f/1.8 and 135mm f/2.8. My arsenal then jumps to a 200mm f/4 and the 300mm f/4.5 EDIF - all solid performers.
    Bob Fowler
    fowler@verizon.net
    Some people are like Slinkies. They're really good for nothing, but they still bring a smile to your face when you push them down a flight of stairs.

  8. #8

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    Just an opinion of course, but I always liked the 24/105 combo. Used the 24 most often though.
    If you opt for a 50 also And if you do a lot of available light the 1.4's a nice option.
    Heavily sedated for your protection.

  9. #9
    bwlina's Avatar
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    Thank you all for your suggestions. Maybe I should add that I mainly do street photography and always in available light - that's why I value fast primes. However, a macro lens would also be interesting. I have to agree with John that 24/105 is a nice combination. But maybe I can afford something in between too.

    I should in all honesty tell you what I use today. That is:
    1) A Rolleiflex 3.5 F (my main camera - I just love it)
    2) A Olympus OM-10 with 100/2.8 and 24/2.8 (these are easier to bring and sometimes better at street photography, and I tend to use these more and more)

    Looking forward to more suggestions......

    Love, Lina

  10. #10

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    Quote Originally Posted by bwlina
    Thank you all for your suggestions. Maybe I should add that I mainly do street photography and always in available light - that's why I value fast primes. However, a macro lens would also be interesting. I have to agree with John that 24/105 is a nice combination. But maybe I can afford something in between too.

    I should in all honesty tell you what I use today. That is:
    1) A Rolleiflex 3.5 F (my main camera - I just love it)
    2) A Olympus OM-10 with 100/2.8 and 24/2.8 (these are easier to bring and sometimes better at street photography, and I tend to use these more and more)

    Looking forward to more suggestions......

    Love, Lina
    Hmm. Since you already have an OM-10, why abandon the Olympus OM system? I'm invested in Nikon, but the Nikon and OM systems are pretty well functionally equivalent; I doubt you'll gain anything significant by switching, and if you end up with two you'll lose.

    You'd be as well off buying a 50 mm Oly lens and maybe a 200 as well -- those two plus a 24 and a 105 are most of my 35 mm kit -- and another OM body for a different emulsion. I don't know why, but many posters here and elsewhere mix 35 mm SLR systems; I just can't see it.

    Good luck, have fun,

    Dan

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