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  1. #11

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    Nikon N6006

    May I suggest the Nikon N6006. I saw that at least one other person suggested an autofocus camera with the autofocus turned off. The N6006 is a decent rugged Nikon autofocus which allows you to use Nikkor lens and turn off the autofocus. The spot meter works great and the camera can be had for a song these days.

  2. #12
    David A. Goldfarb's Avatar
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    I use the Canon New F-1. If you look for one, you might want to try to locate a spot metering focusing screen first. There's a seller on eBay who goes by "goKevincameras" who specializes in high-end Canon FD stuff, among other things, and often has them. Add a 50/1.2L and an 85/1.2L, and you'll have a great low-light kit. A particular attraction is that the regular focusing screens are really bright, and there are even brighter screens optimized for long and short lenses.

    The T-90 has switchable spot metering, so you get everything in the package. It's like an EOS camera for FD lenses.
    flickr--http://www.flickr.com/photos/davidagoldfarb/
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  3. #13

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    The Contax slr S2 has only the Spot meter and is a completely manual camera. The RX and Aria, also manual cameras have options for both Spot and center weighted metering. In fact the Aria includes matrix metering as well. The S2 has a sibling which is the smoke colored S2B. The S2B has only center weighted metering and is very hard to find anyway.

  4. #14
    Shawn Mielke's Avatar
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    SLR cameras with spot meters are a little bit hard to find I've found, which is part of why I went with the Nikon F6. A bit extreme in your case perhaps, but you can wind the film manually (though not advance it), use manual focus lenses to your heart's content, plus have a big beautiful viewfinder with which to work.

  5. #15
    jimjm's Avatar
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    The Nikon F4 provides spot, matrix and 60/40 centerweighted metering capability with all Nikkor AI/AIS MF lenses, as well as AF lenses. Probably the best Nikon body available if you primarily use MF, but occasionally need AF as well. Unless you're shooting sports or fast action, in which case the F100, F5 or F6 have much improved AF systems

  6. #16

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    Quote Originally Posted by Shawn Mielke View Post
    I went with the Nikon F6. A bit extreme in your case perhaps, but you can wind the film manually (though not advance it), use manual focus lenses to your heart's content, plus have a big beautiful viewfinder with which to work.
    I'm confused, how can you wind the film, but not advance it? I don't know the camera, but that sounds like the same thing.

    I would also vote for the Leica R series or the OM-3 or 4 (preferably the better and far more battery efficient Ti versions).

    David.

  7. #17
    copake_ham's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Woolliscroft View Post
    I'm confused, how can you wind the film, but not advance it? I don't know the camera, but that sounds like the same thing.

    I would also vote for the Leica R series or the OM-3 or 4 (preferably the better and far more battery efficient Ti versions).

    David.
    I think he meant you can "rewind" the film manually - so as so shoot partial rolls etc. But the advance is automatic via the built-in motor drive. The F6, much like the F5 and F4 predecessors will permit use of manual lenses and manual focus setting etc. But they are essentially auto film cameras. Amongst other things - they are battery-dependant.

    If that fact "bothers" you (I have no problem with it myself) then you should stay away from such models. Anyway, I don't think a F6 (or any modern Nikon film camera) would suit your needs.

    Anyone who mentions Leica R has already established their mindset - so just go for it.

  8. #18

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    I used to use my EOS 650 largely because of the spot meter. I also used it pretty much exclusively with manual (M42) rather than autofocus lenses.

    It does have a motor drive though, and is fully battery dependent. In that sense it's like the Nikons already mentioned.

    Unfortunately, the shutter has started sticking occasionally.

  9. #19

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    Sticking with Nikon, I believe that the N90S allows you to switch between spot and average metering patterns even with the older manual focus lenses. It will not do matrix metering with non-AF lenses.

  10. #20
    goros's Avatar
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    I own a Nikon F4s that use only with manual focus primes and an Olympus OM4. Both of them have accurate spot meters but I feel more comfortable with the F4. The main reason is that the OM4 has the shutter and the spot metering buttons (plus the high light spot button and shadow spot button) quite small and very close altogether, making the operation a little difficult. It also lacks of viewfinder aperture display.

    On the other hand, the F4 has kingsize dials and buttons and full viewfinder data display plus other features that I like but are out of this topic.

    Cheers
    Alfonso

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