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  1. #1
    Max Power's Avatar
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    Minolta X-Series Users: A Question

    OK, I'll admit that this might be a bit of a silly question, but I was always told that the only really silly question was that one which went unasked

    So I have a roll of Delta 3200 which I will probably need to shoot in low light tomorrow. As you know, the actual film-speed selector only goes up to an EI of 1600. If I want to shoot 3200, can I simply dial in +1 stop on the EV compensation dial and shoot away?

    I believe that this would work, but I want to see if anyone has actually done this before I go out and ruin an expensive roll of film.

    Cheers,
    Kent
    Max Power, he's the man who's name you'd love to touch! But you mustn't touch! His name sounds good in your ear, but when you say it, you mustn't fear! 'Cause his name can be said by anyone!

  2. #2
    gnashings's Avatar
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    Sure - that works. Or mentally keep track and close down one stop from whatever reading you get - but... I could swear it would be -1 to under-expose by one stop...

    God, now I've gone and confused me self...

    Peter.

  3. #3
    Christopher Walrath's Avatar
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    Gnashings is right. Set the dial to -1 EV stops to make exposure for 3200. Not two things here. If using a red filter add 1/2 increased exposure to compensate, thus only decrease exposure by 1/2 total on the exposure compensation dial. Second, the compensation is in the shutter speed as the aperture is not controlled on the camera body, so you cannot go faster than 1/500 as this will be adjusted to 1/1000 automatically.
    Thank you.
    CWalrath
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  4. #4
    joeyk49's Avatar
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    ...one other consideration:

    While I'm still playing around with exposure values on 3200 film, much of the common wisdom around here says that D3200 should actually be rated downward to about 1600 or even 1000 and developed normally.

    I've been rating it at 1600 and have been getting satisfactory results.

    I've had to replace my X700 (capacitor issues) with a 370s. While its an acceptable stand in, I still miss my baby!

    Keep shooting that X! Good luck and have fun with it!

    Joe

  5. #5
    Max Power's Avatar
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    Thanks All

    I'm really glad that I asked my stupid question, or otherwise I would have ruined a stupid expensive roll of Delta 3200...

    You guys were correct about the EV adjustment. That said, this is the first time I've ever used it, so we'll see how it turns out.

    Joey, you say that most people take it down a full stop to 1600...Is it that much better than pushing Delta 400 two stops?

    Cheers,
    Kent
    Max Power, he's the man who's name you'd love to touch! But you mustn't touch! His name sounds good in your ear, but when you say it, you mustn't fear! 'Cause his name can be said by anyone!

  6. #6

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    Note that the exposure compensation trick does NOT work on all bodies--I know on the XD's you're mechanically locked out of combinations of ISO+EC that would exceed that max ISO setting.

    Re: what speed to shoot it at--that depends on your subject and your needs. The further you push, the more shadow detail blocks up and the more grain you get. If you're shooting murky night scenes, blocked shadows look completely natural; if you're just trying for a high shutter speed/big DOF on an overcast day, blocked shadows generally look stupid.

    I personally prefer TMY up to 1600, TMZ/D3200 only at 3200 and beyond. But it's all about that blocked shadows vs. grain tradeoff. For different subject matter I'd view the trade differently.

    Also, you do need to make sure you actually have enough speed to do what you want. If the choice is "sharp but really blocked and grainy at 6400" vs. "blurry but with nice grain and shadows at 1600" the choice seems obvious.

  7. #7
    naaldvoerder's Avatar
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    [QUOTE=joeyk49I've had to replace my X700 (capacitor issues) with a 370s. While its an acceptable stand in, I still miss my baby!

    Joe[/QUOTE]


    I know what you mean. The X700 is a very reliable trooper

  8. #8

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    Exposure compensation works fine on the X700. I use it all the time when I use filters, or need to compensate for extreme lighting conditions.

    I mainly use my Mamiya now, but my X700 still comes on all the trips.

    Anne Marieke

  9. #9
    skahde's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Roger Krueger
    Note that the exposure compensation trick does NOT work on all bodies--I know on the XD's you're mechanically locked out of combinations of ISO+EC that would exceed that max ISO setting.
    I had one for several years and IIRC the same is true for the X700: You can't dial in anything under ISO 25 or above ISO 1600 because both settings work interlocked on the same dial and work on the same stop. I also contemplated this before buying the camera and still remember the disappointment when I actually tried to get to ASA 6400.

    After getting my feet wet I concluded that I wasn't missing anything because all films including Delta 3200 and TMAX3200P will end up with empty shadows and blocked higlights at settings above ISO 1600.

    best

    Stefan

  10. #10
    Max Power's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by skahde
    I had one for several years and IIRC the same is true for the X700: You can't dial in anything under ISO 25 or above ISO 1600 because both settings work interlocked on the same dial and work on the same stop. I also contemplated this before buying the camera and still remember the disappointment when I actually tried to get to ASA 6400.
    I'll let all of you know if it worked once I develop the roll. I assume that it will have worked, because when I put my X-700 on aperture priority, placed the film speed dial to 1600 and moved the EV compensation dial, the shutter speed changed. Based on this, I figure that it probably worked.

    Kent
    Max Power, he's the man who's name you'd love to touch! But you mustn't touch! His name sounds good in your ear, but when you say it, you mustn't fear! 'Cause his name can be said by anyone!

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