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Thread: old lenses

  1. #21

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    How about the new voigtlander lenses? are these designs true to their names or just fancy planars?

    Quote Originally Posted by df cardwell
    By the mid 1970s, most lenses were of similar design, manufacture, quality control, and varied only by price point. They should be seen as the 'baseline', rather than as 'vintage' lenses. Chances are, the lens on a new camera will be a '70s design - unless it is a zoom. And if you want a different look, dig deep into your wallet for one of the few 21st century lenses, or go back to a pre- 1970 lens.

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  2. #22

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    In terms of producing a print that has a "retro look" not only do you need to consider the lens type and age, but as already pointed out, the film/developer and paper/developer and enlarger. Using new papers and developers I have a hard matching the look of prints that I made in the 60 with my negatives of that time frame. I even converted a 35 mm enlager to point source, close but not an exact match. I have yet to find a replacement for Agfa Brovira #4. I still use my Retina and Pentex systems and my Wollensak lens on my Crown and Speeds, but the resulting prints do not match prints I made in the 60s and 70s on Medalist, Dupont, Agfa, and Kodabromide.

  3. #23

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    Quote Originally Posted by Ole
    Most enlarger lenses are either 4-element Tessar types, or 6-element Plasmats. There are a few rare 4-element dialytes too, but not many. The most "exotic" one is probably the Voigtländer WZ (2 elements soft-focus enlarger lens), but that is old.
    I've got a 50mm Soviet Vega-11U enlarger lens, which is supposedly a 5-element design. (The Web page with that information seems to have moved or been taken down, though.)

  4. #24
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    The Voigtlanders are really interesting: they are evolved planar / double gauss or whatever we call them this month, but the new design techniques really don't need to follow old forms.

    They have really great design, and have an efficient assembly. Efficient, but not perfect. So, they are quite fine performers, but not in the league of the latest Leica lenses. Value ? Extremely high. Erwin Puts talks about them pretty even handedly.

    As for the 'look' of the lens, and whether they have Vintage look ? No. Not to me.

    But for a RFDR shooter, put a couple in the bag for normal shooting, and hunt down a 1951 Nikkor or '30s leica lens for Vintage.
    "One of the painful things about our time is that those who feel certainty are stupid,
    and those with any imagination and understanding are filled with doubt and indecision"

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  5. #25
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    I'd have to say that the subject matter and lighting are just as important in giving something a vintage look. I took the shot below about a month ago. Most people who I showed it to thought that it was shot in the 50's. I used a modern camera (Nikon F3), a semi-modern lens wide open (Nikkor 50mm f1.4 AI) and fairly modern film (TMAX3200). It was the lighting more than anything that created this look. I think the grain contributed a lot too, but if I had shot a bass player from a punk band in the same situation in color no one would have thought it was from the 50's. In conclusion, I believe it's mostly psychological and very little to do with a magic lens.
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  6. #26
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    Groovy picture Ara !

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    "One of the painful things about our time is that those who feel certainty are stupid,
    and those with any imagination and understanding are filled with doubt and indecision"

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  7. #27

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    Quote Originally Posted by avandesande
    How about the new voigtlander lenses? are these designs true to their names or just fancy planars?
    Trade names have no implications for design.

  8. #28

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    Quote Originally Posted by Ole
    Most enlarger lenses are either 4-element Tessar types, or 6-element Plasmats. There are a few rare 4-element dialytes too, but not many. The most "exotic" one is probably the Voigtländer WZ (2 elements soft-focus enlarger lens), but that is old.

    Some condensers are aspheric - mostly high-end 35mm enlargers. The rest are one- or two-element spherical.

    It's an interesting thought, that you have to get very new or very old to get something unusual. I think it might be correct, too. The largest variation in design and quality seems to have been the "Anastigmat explosion" in the beginning of the 20th century, when every lens maker had at least one "unique" flavor of anastigmat!
    FYI, 50/4.5 and 75/4.5 Enlarging Ektars are 5/3 heliar types. Ektar is a prime example of a trade name that's been applied to a wide range of designs. And there have been many, many triplet type enlarging lenses.

  9. #29
    Ole
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    Were they Heliar-heliar types, Dynar-heliar types or Oxyn-heliar types?

    Most Heliars are Dynars; most lenses sold as Dynar were Tele-Dynars, and most of Voigtländers enlarger and repro lenses were Oxyns...

    The new Cosina Voigtländer lens series treat the names as what they've always been: Names only.
    -- Ole Tjugen, Luddite Elitist
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  10. #30

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    Quote Originally Posted by Ole
    Were they Heliar-heliar types, Dynar-heliar types or Oxyn-heliar types?

    Most Heliars are Dynars; most lenses sold as Dynar were Tele-Dynars, and most of Voigtländers enlarger and repro lenses were Oxyns...

    The new Cosina Voigtländer lens series treat the names as what they've always been: Names only.
    Fair question re the Enlarging Ektars. I've never learned how to differentiate between the various dynar-like Voigtlaender lenses. But if you want, I can give the number of the US patent that covers Kodak's heliar types.

    Cheers,

    Dan

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