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  1. #1

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    Manual focus Nikon F to AF F mount lenses

    I let my Nikon F systems go long before the advent of F mount AF systems. Although I can do the non-AI, AI, AIS & converted dance in my sleep, I can't tell Larry if his AF lenses will fit the Nikkormat I've listed in the classifieds. I know someone here can, so PLEASE do.....Thanks a bundle!

  2. #2

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    If you nikkormat is older than the FT3 which is an AI camera then Larry can mount just about any of his AF lens on it but... with the G lens he can not adjust the aperture (so it's basically no good). Other AF lenses will work but must be metered in the stop down mode as non of the AF lenses have the coupling prong. If the camera is the AI version then they will work fine except the G lenses which is only good for minimum aperture.

  3. #3
    PhotoJim's Avatar
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    As long as the lens isn't a G lens as noted above, you will be fine. The Nikkormat FS has no meter so you get full functionality. The FT, FTn, FT2, EL and EL-W support only stop-down metering, although if you want you can get the coupling shoes added to the aperture ring. The FT3 and EL2 (the latter of which is labelled Nikon, but is really a Nikkormat) permit full-aperture metering. I use AF lenses on my FT3 all the time.

  4. #4
    L Gebhardt's Avatar
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    Thanks for the answers. Glad I will be able to use the lenses i have with the camera. I would like to get more MF lenses because they just feel better, but for now I plan on using the AF lenses.

    A dumb question, but what is the difference between a Nikkormat and the other Nikon cameras?

  5. #5

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    Quote Originally Posted by L Gebhardt
    "... what is the difference between a Nikkormat and the other Nikon cameras...?"
    In a nutshell... marketing. Nikkormat was marketed to "serious amateurs" while Nikon was marketed mainly to "pros."

  6. #6
    L Gebhardt's Avatar
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    Thanks Bob, that's what I figured it might be, but I wasn't sure.

  7. #7
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    Quote Originally Posted by L Gebhardt
    . . . what is the difference between a Nikkormat and the other Nikon cameras?
    As I recall, the Nikkormat sold for about 40% less than the Nikon F. It lacked many of the features that made the Nikon F the premier 35mm system of that time. Unlike its predecessor, the Nikkorex, the Nikkormat was reliable and durable. I regularly use both Nikkormat and Nikon F.

  8. #8
    DBP
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    Quote Originally Posted by Jim Jones
    As I recall, the Nikkormat sold for about 40% less than the Nikon F. It lacked many of the features that made the Nikon F the premier 35mm system of that time. Unlike its predecessor, the Nikkorex, the Nikkormat was reliable and durable. I regularly use both Nikkormat and Nikon F.
    The Nikon (F and F2) had interchangeable screens, finders and backs, and a horizontal titanium focal plane shutter. The Nikkormat had a fixed pentaprism, screen, and back, and a vertical Copal square shutter. The primary metering option for the F was usually echoed in the Nikkormat. In 1966, a Nikon F with 50/2 and Photomic metering prism listed for $402.50, the Nikkormat FT with 50/2 for $269.50. Makes the price for the late, lamented FM3a look pretty good doesn't it?

  9. #9

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    Quote Originally Posted by DBP
    The Nikon (F and F2) had interchangeable screens, finders and backs, and a horizontal titanium focal plane shutter. The Nikkormat had a fixed pentaprism, screen, and back, and a vertical Copal square shutter. The primary metering option for the F was usually echoed in the Nikkormat. In 1966, a Nikon F with 50/2 and Photomic metering prism listed for $402.50, the Nikkormat FT with 50/2 for $269.50. Makes the price for the late, lamented FM3a look pretty good doesn't it?
    But then the FM series is really the new Nikkormat.

  10. #10
    DBP
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    Quote Originally Posted by Chan Tran
    But then the FM series is really the new Nikkormat.
    When it went out of production, an FM3a with 50/1.8 was going for around $620. Find me another product, not subject to Moore's law, that has incorporated 40 years of advances while going up 2.3 times. And the FM-10 is arguably a closer equivalent, and sells for less than the Nikkormat did. I know, it's not as solidly built as the Nikkormat, but a modern Chevy Impala is not as solid as the 1966 counterpart either. When you look at things in constant year dollars, photographic equipment, even new, is much cheaper than ever.

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