Switch to English Language Passer en langue française Omschakelen naar Nederlandse Taal Wechseln Sie zu deutschen Sprache Passa alla lingua italiana
Members: 68,766   Posts: 1,484,113   Online: 946
      
Page 1 of 2 12 LastLast
Results 1 to 10 of 14

Thread: Bokeh& apeture

  1. #1
    Markok765's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2006
    Location
    Ontario, Canada
    Shooter
    Medium Format
    Posts
    2,270
    Blog Entries
    1
    Images
    24

    Bokeh& apeture

    What does the number of blades have in common with bokeh? my uncle has a leica with 11 blades apeture and my lens has 6. the boken is beautiful in the photo he took. my boken is not that good.

    Marko

  2. #2
    BWGirl's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2004
    Location
    Wisconsin, USA
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    3,050
    Images
    18
    Well, maybe I am showing my ignorance here, but I always thought bokeh was a function of aperture opening (ie f2.8) rather than blades on the actual aperture. I will be interested to see the responses from people much more knowledgable.

    BTW - what aperture settings did you each use?
    Jeanette
    .................................................. ................
    Isaiah 25:1

  3. #3

    Join Date
    Apr 2006
    Location
    baton rouge, louisiana
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    40
    Images
    3
    beat him up and steal his leica. then you have 11 bladed aperture.

    bokeh depends on many factors, not just aperture blades. it depends on how wide open you're shooting the lens at and correspondingly depth of field, and of course the optical quality of the glass. the more blades though, the rounder bokeh is in general. remember though that if you use your lense wide open, not stopped down any, then the aperture blades are withdrawn and so number is irrelevant.

    and don't forget about what you're actually taking a picture of- the subject is important too!

    what kind of camera are you using? i'm sure some people will swear that your uncle's bokeh is so good because he is using a leica, but you can get good bokeh with almost any camera. just open the aperture up all the way!

  4. #4
    Markok765's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2006
    Location
    Ontario, Canada
    Shooter
    Medium Format
    Posts
    2,270
    Blog Entries
    1
    Images
    24
    Quote Originally Posted by DirkDynamo
    beat him up and steal his leica. then you have 11 bladed aperture.

    bokeh depends on many factors, not just aperture blades. it depends on how wide open you're shooting the lens at and correspondingly depth of field, and of course the optical quality of the glass. the more blades though, the rounder bokeh is in general. remember though that if you use your lense wide open, not stopped down any, then the aperture blades are withdrawn and so number is irrelevant.

    and don't forget about what you're actually taking a picture of- the subject is important too!

    what kind of camera are you using? i'm sure some people will swear that your uncle's bokeh is so good because he is using a leica, but you can get good bokeh with almost any camera. just open the aperture up all the way!
    I am usuing a ashahi pentax sp500 with the 55 1.8,35 3.5, and the 105 2.8

  5. #5
    George Papantoniou's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2005
    Location
    Athens
    Shooter
    Medium Format
    Posts
    981
    Images
    39
    I guess the aperture "roundness" can play a role, but the lense's design (number of groups and elements, aberrations correction etc) must be more important. Things that go on in your mind are even more important. Read the online articles about it. There are interesting discussions on older APUG threads about it (even etymological info on the word "bokeh" by a Japanese wuthority on the subject). Execute a search about it...

  6. #6
    Andrey Donchev's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2004
    Location
    Bulgaria
    Shooter
    Medium Format
    Posts
    99
    I think that it will be a good idea for you to read the Christopher Perez's comparison test of six lenses found here, and especially his conclusion. In my experience I also find that the number of blades of the aperture, respectively its form has crucial effect on the "bokeh" in the picture.

  7. #7
    df cardwell's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2005
    Location
    Dearborn,Michigan & Cape Breton Island
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    3,342
    Images
    8
    Your 105 Takumar ought to be very good.
    "One of the painful things about our time is that those who feel certainty are stupid,
    and those with any imagination and understanding are filled with doubt and indecision"

    -Bertrand Russell

  8. #8
    David A. Goldfarb's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2002
    Location
    Honolulu, Hawai'i
    Shooter
    Large Format
    Posts
    17,081
    Images
    20
    Roundness of the aperture is relevant, but probably not as important as the degree of correction of spherical aberration. An overcorrected lens will often be very sharp, but can have "bad bokeh." Lenses with lots of aperture blades also happen to be older lenses, or in some cases newer lenses aimed at a market that is interested in good bokeh.

    Aperture and subject distance are relevant as well. You might find that within a certain aperture range a lens has good bokeh, but it might get harsh when stopped down. The thing is, if you're using a camera where you can see what the lens is doing (i.e., an SLR or view camera), to pay attention to the out-of-focus area at the shooting aperture, just as much as you would pay attention to the subject.
    flickr--http://www.flickr.com/photos/davidagoldfarb/
    Photography (not as up to date as the flickr site)--http://www.davidagoldfarb.com/photo
    Academic (Slavic and Comparative Literature)--http://www.davidagoldfarb.com

  9. #9

    Join Date
    Dec 2004
    Location
    Milwaukee, Wi
    Shooter
    35mm
    Posts
    3,242
    Even the location of the diaphragm influences the bokeh effects. A manufacturer makes choices about bokeh during design and manufacturing release. It can end up being a trade off between bokeh and optical correction.
    Claire (Ms Anne Thrope is in the darkroom)

  10. #10

    Join Date
    Mar 2005
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    3,203
    Quote Originally Posted by Claire Senft
    Even the location of the diaphragm influences the bokeh effects. A manufacturer makes choices about bokeh during design and manufacturing release. It can end up being a trade off between bokeh and optical correction.
    Hmm. And to think I'd thought that for each lens design, fully specified, there was only one place the diaphragm could be placed.

    Was there enough computing power in the universe to all the choices you describe before the mid-'60s? I have the impression that nearly all of the work done when designing a lens is focused on reducing aberrations, getting adequate field flatness, and getting the desired coverage. And, of course, making sure that the design can be manufactured economically.

    What does manufacturing have to do with any aspect of lens performance? Either the finished product is near enough to spec to pass QC inspection or it isn't.

Page 1 of 2 12 LastLast


 

APUG PARTNERS EQUALLY FUNDING OUR COMMUNITY:



Contact Us  |  Support Us!  |  Advertise  |  Site Terms  |  Archive  —   Search  |  Mobile Device Access  |  RSS  |  Facebook  |  Linkedin