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  1. #31
    get_me_a_gun's Avatar
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    I would reccomend a Nikon FM, its a sturdy, reliable, and very simple camera. The meter is very simple, (+), (0), and (-). The only thing powered by the battery is the meter. They are reasonably priced at around $150.

    Hope you got the info you wanted,
    Lisa

  2. #32
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    Quote Originally Posted by Roger Hicks
    I really disagree about the fully manual/separate meter route. Intellectually, it's attractive, and it's the way many of us learned. That doesn't mean it's the best route for a 10-year-old in 2006.

    I don't know the boy in question, obviously (though I like him already!) but I DO know, both from teaching in schools and from young friends 10-15 who have taken an interest in photography, that if it gets too much like hard work, there are far too many other distractions available and they will be taken.

    Cheers,

    Roger
    Its not distracting, i have only used manual film cameras with a lightmeter and im only 13
    Marko Kovacevic
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  3. #33
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    Any good 35mm and let him run with it. He will let you know when he is ready for more.
    DIGITAL IS FOR THOSE AFRAID OF THE DARK.

  4. #34
    DBP
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    The more I think about it the more I think a TLR might be the right answer. I've always found looking into a hood at ground glass makes me more aware of the whole frame, and if he uses one of the old red window advances he won't blow through film so fast. But I expect to go shooting sometime soon with a ten-year-old and matching Argus C-3s, so I will let you know about the metering issue. I plan to use Sunny 16 with him.

  5. #35

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    If he's already able to use the Canon A-1... and you don't mind the "permanent loan"... then I can't think of a better solution.

  6. #36
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    Perhaps I am biased because I really didn't like the A-1 I have (no particular technical shortcoming - just not to my liking), but I would definitely second and third the suggestions of all the K1000, FTb, etc. Of course, you already have FD lenses - so an FTb is the obvious choice. I think simplicitymay be an asset, since the highly electronics-laden A1 is a bit complex.
    I learned as a kid using a Lubitel (I was 11 when my dad got sick of me stealing his Zenit... jeez, this sounds almost familiar - except I didn't show any talent), and the Zenits simple needle on the top board of the body and exposure "calculator" around the rewind knob taught me how things relate to each other much better than any flashing numbers in the viewfinder ever could. Simple, reliable, and basic is, in my humble opinion, the way to go. I don't an FTb would be a talent-strangling step down by any means - actually, I think someone justlearning would be better served and get better esuylts from a camera like that. Don't you worry - he will end up with your A1 sooner or later

    Peter.

  7. #37

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    Dear Marko,

    Fair enough. I don't know him and I don't know you. Both of you are clearly a good bit livelier than average. But I have met a lot of young photographers who DON'T want to make the effort you have.

    Congratulations on the exhibition, by the way. And if I were you, I WOULD take my camera.

    You say you'd use a Super Takumar. What camera are you using? (Sorry if you've posted this elsewhere and I've not seen it).

    Finally, could I possibly persuade you to use capital 'I' instead of lower case? I know it's only a convention but it does make it a lot easier for old farts to read your posts and indeed to take you more seriously.

    Cheers,

    Roger (www.rogerandfrances.com)

  8. #38

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    Roger, I would opine that by 10 years old humans are already displayimg traits that they will show thru out their lives. Anyone lacking sufficent interest in learning the basics will go no place in any skill that requires perseverance. These traits are both genetic and enviromental in their formation.

    What skills are satisfying that do not require perseverance? If you like to play soccer then some training and practice are in order. If you enjoy fishing and want to catch some fish then some learning is and patience are required.

    I will concede that using automated equipment may be helpful to spark a person's interest in photography but that such usage without the underlying foundation of craft will be determental in th near and far run.

    Why dumb down photography? As an older person I learned as a child that if I wanted to go someplace my bicycle or feet would have get me there. Was I worse off for having the exercise? Are children that are taken every place by mom or dad or they do not participate in something beter off? Effort is required and effort satisfies the a person's being.
    Claire (Ms Anne Thrope is in the darkroom)

  9. #39

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    Quote Originally Posted by Roger Hicks
    I really disagree about the fully manual/separate meter route. Intellectually, it's attractive, and it's the way many of us learned. That doesn't mean it's the best route for a 10-year-old in 2006.

    I don't know the boy in question, obviously (though I like him already!) but I DO know, both from teaching in schools and from young friends 10-15 who have taken an interest in photography, that if it gets too much like hard work, there are far too many other distractions available and they will be taken.

    Cheers,

    Roger
    I couldn't agree with Roger more (no pun intended).

    I've always thought that absolute beginners should go with as much automation as possible. It can indeed become too much work if the beginner had to figure out everything. I think composition is the first and most important thing one should learn about photography, followed next by exposure and everything else technical after that.

  10. #40

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    Quote Originally Posted by hkr
    I couldn't agree with Roger more (no pun intended).

    I've always thought that absolute beginners should go with as much automation as possible. It can indeed become too much work if the beginner had to figure out everything. I think composition is the first and most important thing one should learn about photography, followed next by exposure and everything else technical after that.

    me too!

    i used a kodak flashfun "point and shoot" that my mom gave me from the time i was 7 or so until i got a kodak k1000 when i was 14 or 15 ... the ability to just shoot, and not "deal" with anything else is ideal.

    i would even opt for something totally automatic like a high end point and shoot (do they make them with a flash sync? ). some of them churn out better negatives than "high end" 35mm slrs. after all it isn't really the camera (just a recording device) its what you can do with it ...

    -john

    ps. the only reason why i got the k1000 was because it was a requirement for a school photo course.

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