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  1. #11

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    Are these differences only among the prints... or are there differences in the film processing as well? In other words, how do the negs compare?

  2. #12
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    I'm a bit surprised by the initial query in that I always thought that both UV and skylight filters are color-neutral. Previously, I almost always used skylight 1A filters. Recently, during an intense "affair" getting into RF's I got a lot of Nikkor lenses and mounted UV's on them as the on-line store I deal with only had UVs in the size I wanted.

    To be honest, I've always thought of UV and skylight filters as m/l protective glass "covers" to save the lens if you have an "oops" and always figured them to have no effect on color rendition.

  3. #13
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    Skylight filters have a small amount of warming rendition to them, if you hold one up side by side with a UV you will see a small amount of pink cast to the filter which does render on film.

    R.

  4. #14

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    As I mentioned in my starting post, I do believe that the bluish tinge is just natural. Probably it is my eyes which have been trained on seeing digital photos for 4 years that are the problem. Most digital cameras have a weak blue channel for the obvious reason that it contains the most noise. Also I believe humans prefer warmer colors in general. When I shot film, I used warming filters quite often. I lost this habit with digital. I will probably have to gain the habit again. Judging from the above posts, I don't think the skylight filters will make any discernible difference. So I will keep my UVs on and use warming filters whenever necessary. Thank you all for your kind replies. :-)

  5. #15
    naturephoto1's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by edwardkaraa
    As I mentioned in my starting post, I do believe that the bluish tinge is just natural. Probably it is my eyes which have been trained on seeing digital photos for 4 years that are the problem. Most digital cameras have a weak blue channel for the obvious reason that it contains the most noise. Also I believe humans prefer warmer colors in general. When I shot film, I used warming filters quite often. I lost this habit with digital. I will probably have to gain the habit again. Judging from the above posts, I don't think the skylight filters will make any discernible difference. So I will keep my UVs on and use warming filters whenever necessary. Thank you all for your kind replies. :-)
    Edward,

    I am almost sure if you shot the same image with the same lighting, lens and film and exposure and compared the results taken with UV and Skylight Filters and kept excellent records of the the exposures, that you would find a difference in the results.

    Rich
    Richard A. Nelridge
    http://www.nelridge.com

  6. #16

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    Dear Wiggy,

    Yes, it's far worse with amateur labs. My only point really was that even with the best pro labs, the variation can be surprising.

    Cheers,

    Roger

  7. #17
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    Quote Originally Posted by edwardkaraa
    Thanks guys for your replies. Back in film days, I used to shoot velvia 50 almost exclusively, which could explain why I practically didn't encounter the bluishness, well maybe I did but was used to it that time. As for the location, I am living currently in Bangkok, Thailand. I have never measured the color temperature scientifically, but to my eyes at least, the atmosphere looks quite bluish here even on sunny days, maybe something to do with humidity or tropical weather.
    I wonder if you either have a lot of haze or air pollution as well. The 81A is a good choice for your situation. You may also want to try a Tiffen Warm Polarizing filter - it does wonderful things with greens, especially when used with Velvia.
    Robert M. Teague
    www.visionlandscapes.com
    www.apug.org/forums/portfolios.php?u=2235

    "A man who works with his hands is a laborer; a man who works with his hands and his brain is a craftsman; a man who works with his hands and his brain and his heart is an artist" -- Louis Nizer

  8. #18

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    Quote Originally Posted by naturephoto1
    Edward,

    I am almost sure if you shot the same image with the same lighting, lens and film and exposure and compared the results taken with UV and Skylight Filters and kept excellent records of the the exposures, that you would find a difference in the results.

    Rich
    You might pick up the difference with transparency directly but with all the variables in printing negs I really doubt it.
    Heavily sedated for your protection.

  9. #19
    naturephoto1's Avatar
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    John,

    That is true especially if the printer or machine is correcting for filtration, but in Edward's first post he mentioned transparencies, including Velvia. That is the reason that I made the comments. In addition, most or all of this thread has been referring to transparencies.

    Rich
    Richard A. Nelridge
    http://www.nelridge.com

  10. #20

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    Yes, that is correct. Now I'm only using Fujichrome film.
    Quote Originally Posted by naturephoto1
    John,

    That is true especially if the printer or machine is correcting for filtration, but in Edward's first post he mentioned transparencies, including Velvia. That is the reason that I made the comments. In addition, most or all of this thread has been referring to transparencies.

    Rich

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