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  1. #1

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    skylight filters

    Hi,

    Just came back to film after 4 years of digital. Maybe I have been spoiled by the color temperature control I had with my DSLRs, but I am noticing most of my film shot outdoors has a slight bluish cast. Maybe I'll get used to it again, but I was thinking of replacing all the UV filters I have currently on my lenses (7 in total) with skylight filters. Before spending 400$ on the filters I thought to ask here first whether you think this would help or not. I shoot almost exclusively fujichrome velvia, and provia 100 and 400.

    Thanks for your replies.

  2. #2

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    You just need some warming filters. Get a holder and adapters for your various lens sizes. Based on your shooting subjects, you may consider anything from medium warm 81B to EF for situations where the light is very bluish.

    The old Velvia 50 stock had a kelvin rating for neutral of 5700 deg I believe. Provia's temp is much lower at around 5300-5400. Any temp above the rating such as shooting in the forest (blue conditions) with a film such as Provia will cause your pictures to go blue. Velvia's higher temp was a reason why the pictures were somewhat warm depending on subject and time of day.

  3. #3
    naturephoto1's Avatar
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    Edward,

    I went the other way some years ago. The UV filters tend to remove UV light and a bit of the blue. The Skylight filters will warm up the subject somewhat adding a bit of magenta. It is a matter of choice if you wish to use either of these filters as a lens protector. Now there are protecting filters that can be gotten that are basically clear.

    As Wayne has indicated there are warming filters that are available that you may wish to use at times. As Wayne indicates there is the 81 Series of filters that go from about 81A to 81EF in glass (and their German equivalents). Additionally, Singh-Ray has a proprietary warming filter available in many sizes including the Cokin P size and is called an A-13 filter (I often use these). Tiffen also offers the 812 filter (basically in the 81 series of color) but proprietary and is offered by no other maker. I used to use the Tiffen 812 often.

    Rich
    Richard A. Nelridge
    http://www.nelridge.com

  4. #4
    roteague's Avatar
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    Edward,

    You haven't told us much about where you live and shoot, that makes a difference. When photographing at home (Hawaii) I don't notice much of an increase of blue in my transparencies, but when I was shooting in the mountains of New Zealand last year, it was quite noticeable. So, the answer is, it depends. You might try getting a: UV, Skylight and 81A for one of your lenses and run a quick test against Velvia 100.

    FWIW, I don't use either filter - Skylight or UV. When I use filters, it is usually an 81A or Tiffen Warm Polarizer (Polarizing filter + 812).
    Robert M. Teague
    www.visionlandscapes.com
    www.apug.org/forums/portfolios.php?u=2235

    "A man who works with his hands is a laborer; a man who works with his hands and his brain is a craftsman; a man who works with his hands and his brain and his heart is an artist" -- Louis Nizer

  5. #5

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    Thanks guys for your replies. Back in film days, I used to shoot velvia 50 almost exclusively, which could explain why I practically didn't encounter the bluishness, well maybe I did but was used to it that time. As for the location, I am living currently in Bangkok, Thailand. I have never measured the color temperature scientifically, but to my eyes at least, the atmosphere looks quite bluish here even on sunny days, maybe something to do with humidity or tropical weather. I do have the 81A along so many Cokin P filters lying around in my storage room, I have to dig them out and make a few tries. I don't like Cokin however, because the filters are low quality organic material and they tend to flare a lot. Any "warm" chrome film still available nowadays?

  6. #6
    naturephoto1's Avatar
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    Edward,

    I would tend to stay away from Cokin filters; the Cokin holders are OK. High quality resin filters are available by both Lee and Singh-Ray as well as other makers to fit the Cokin P holder. You will tend to have to be aware of the sun reflecting off any filter surface and may wish to either get a hood as in a Cokin P hood or just shield the filter/lens from sunlight when it is an issue.

    As the sun goes higher in the sky soon after sunrise to the hour or so prior to sunset, the sky is blue. Shadow areas also will take on a bluish cast and certain transparencies will react heavily to this.

    Fuji has come out with Velvia 100. Robert can fill you in on the performance of the film, I still have to try it. Additionally, Kodak has come out with some warm transparency material, but I have to defer to others for recommendations.

    Rich
    Richard A. Nelridge
    http://www.nelridge.com

  7. #7
    gnashings's Avatar
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    Please disregard this if you have ruled this out, but I have noticed that a by-product of the digital epidemic is a rash of horrible quality photo developing. In my area, even outfits who fancy themselves as pro-oriented (Vistek comes to mind, don't even get me started!) return sub par proofs that have little to do with what you have actually captured on your film.
    Of course, if you are talking exclusively transparency (and now that I look at the thread again, I think this may the case), just ignore my ramblings entirely aside from a warm (wamer than a 81A!) "Welcome Back!"

    Peter.

  8. #8

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    I don't think the answer here is to screw something on your lenses and leave it there in perpetuity. The answer is I'm afraid to assess the colour of light on a shot by shot. place by place basis and decide how best to deal with it in the context of what film you're using. The solution in some cases may be the tiny warming effect of a skylight, or the stronger warming effect of an 81c or KR3.

    Either of the Provias in shade or dull weather may well need a 81c or stronger, whereas the same film in strong direct sun will need no correction at all excpt perhaps in mountains or at the seaside. Velvia 50 is notorious for picking up every little nuance of colour in the light and exaggerating it, most strongly when the angle of the light is low. I have dawn and sunset shots with Velvia 50 made in relatively unspectacular light that have really noticeable casts from blue to pink via magenta. Its not just the characteristics of the film itself,it's how the film interacts with the ambient light that you're trying to see or predict. Whilst the lottery can be interesting, on balance I'm finding the new Velvia 100 more predictable and to me, that's an advantage.

  9. #9

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    Try another lab first.

    When I was working in advertising in London, many years ago, we had to change labs, so we shot six identical rolls and sent them to six of the top pro labs in London. Variations of CC05 or even CC10 and +/- 1/3 stop were visible. One of the things you pay for in a pro lab is consistency, but you lab might be consistently blue...

    Cheers,

    Roger (www.rogerandfrances.com)

  10. #10
    Wigwam Jones's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Roger Hicks
    Try another lab first.

    When I was working in advertising in London, many years ago, we had to change labs, so we shot six identical rolls and sent them to six of the top pro labs in London. Variations of CC05 or even CC10 and +/- 1/3 stop were visible. One of the things you pay for in a pro lab is consistency, but you lab might be consistently blue...

    Cheers,

    Roger (www.rogerandfrances.com)
    AP has done a number of tests of high street processors on a yearly basis. Same film, shot under the same circumstances, at the same time, by the same photographer. One can clearly see, even in a magazine reprint, that there are huge differences in reproduction. I can only assume the situation is the same everywhere.
    Best,

    Wiggy

    Note to Self: Tse-Tse Fly - No Antidote

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