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  1. #21
    Markok765's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Roxi331
    Marko,

    Have you ever shot a wedding?

    R.
    No, but im going to with my uncle. he is usign a leica for it. unusual wedding camers.. i tryed out thses lenses and they are great
    Marko Kovacevic
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  2. #22

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    Hello Luke,

    You ask a great question, and based on your needs I would suggest the following:

    Hands down, F100 with MB-15 (vertical grip) vs. F5. The technology of the F100 is newer and one major advantage over the F5 is the 5 RED focus indicators within the view finder. The F5s do not indicate as well. This is a big advantage as you become familiar with using different focus spots. Compared to all F bodies, F5 was not out long before it was replaced with the F6 -- Reasons based on the lack of red indicators, battery consumption, weight, and noise.

    With the F5, you can lock up mirror, a bit stronger build, change view finders, more FPS; I do not believe either will have an advantage for shooting weddings.

    If I was given a choice between a free F100 and a F5, I would still choose the F100. (for weddings)

    Lenses,
    I have both the 28-70 2.8 AFS and 80-200 2.8 AF (non AFS). They are both great and I would suggest getting the US 5 Year Warranty. I have not kept up on the newer released lenses, but the 80-200 2.8 is a must have. For weddings, I would never use a lens slower at this focal length. There is a newer 70-200 2.8 VR and I have heard good reviews but very costly. There is a 80-200 AFS, but I don't believe the added cost is worth the extra 10% gain speed of focusing.

    For weddings, I would stay away from lenses slower than 2.8 and especially variable speed lenses which can make shooting with a flash a bit more challenging. I don't shoot much wide anymore, so I can't share much experience on current lenses. When I was shooting weddings, I hardly ever used my prime lenses except when I needed wide.

    Flash:
    Any Nikon Speed light works great. I would suggest the SB-28 with a Quantum Turbo Z battery pack. The newer costly flashes are designed for film/digital bodies which may have options that you will never need for film capture. If you become highly dependable on TTL (or other nice options), I would suggest 2+ Nikon flash heads; the hot shoe is made of plastic and is open to damaged (which can be easily repaired with parts). If you mainly shoot flash in manual power setting with occasional TTL, than I would suggest 1 SB-28 and 1+ Vivtar 285 (with Quantum pack).

    If you need any off-camera flash equipment recommendations, please let me know.

    I hope this helps,

    Shane Knight
    www.shaneknight.com

  3. #23
    tony lockerbie's Avatar
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    Hi Luke, I have shot many weddings and have progressed through many Nikon cameras starting with the F3, F4, and am now using the F100. Why not the F5 I hear you say? I compared the F5 with the F100 and prefered the F100 because of the more up to date features and it was also cheaper!

    I use the 24 - 120 VR zoom for most of the time but also have a 50mm 1.4 and 85 1.4 for low light and or shallow DOF.

    The zoom is very sharp once it is closed down a couple of stops and the range is extremely useful for wedding work. I don't like changing lenses on the run.

    The F100 has proved very reliable and has terrific metering. I do however keep a FM2 as a back up because as an old guy I still don't quite trust all electric cameras. Don't know why though as none of them has ever let me down!

    Noting Shanes comments on the SB28 I must concur as I have broken off the shoe on mine. I purchased a SB80dx and it has a much stronger metal shoe with a cam locking mechanism - Nikon have learnt from their mistakes.

    Cheers, Tony

  4. #24

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    Quote Originally Posted by tony lockerbie

    Noting Shanes comments on the SB28 I must concur as I have broken off the shoe on mine. I purchased a SB80dx and it has a much stronger metal shoe with a cam locking mechanism - Nikon have learnt from their mistakes.

    Cheers, Tony
    Nikon's newer flashes which have a stronger/metal shoe and a better locking mechanism may not be much of improvement depending how you treat your equipment. I believe we all can agree when shooting weddings, it is unavoidable at times that small and large accidents happen to your equipment. For example, you turn to look at the bride and you smack your camera flash into a child who was below your vision (ouch), or you smack your flash into a door jam, a little here and a little there. When an accident(s) happen, after a while something has to give. The newer metal/stronger hot shoe actually sends the breaking point to your cameras body/shoe loosening it from the camera over time. I had to send my cameras in to have repaired which is more expensive than fixing the shoe on the flash.

    The key words above are "depending how you treat your equipment". Myself, I use my equipment almost everyday (not weddings) and I am brutal and show no mercy on my Nikon setup.

    Shane

  5. #25
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    I think you actually have to handle both camera, and see which you can handle easiest. I have an F5 as well as an N80 (with the accesssory battery pack), both are different cameras. The N80 has some features the F5 doesn't, but overall I prefer the F5. I have big hands, so a big camera handles better for me. You can't take good images, if you aren't comfortable with the equipment. I have a 24 - 120 VR lens as well, it is a great lens.
    Robert M. Teague
    www.visionlandscapes.com
    www.apug.org/forums/portfolios.php?u=2235

    "A man who works with his hands is a laborer; a man who works with his hands and his brain is a craftsman; a man who works with his hands and his brain and his heart is an artist" -- Louis Nizer

  6. #26

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    Unohu, one lens to think about is the nikon 105mm f2.5 AIS. If you want to try one out, let me know and I'll lend you mine. I can also point you to shots on my flickr site that use that in tandem with my N90s.

  7. #27

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    35mm zoom lenses are better than my two primes for 645.
    Hmm!!!

  8. #28
    Sportera's Avatar
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    I have shot several weddings with and F100 mounted to a stroboframe with a 28-105mm. I also used a 50mm F1.8 and 85mm F1.8 for posed portraits, along with the Hassy for formals.

    The F100's flash exposure nails the exposure almost every time.

    For night weddings use 400 speed film and shoot in Manual mode with a shutter speed of 1/30 and f4.5~5.6 this will allow some ambient light in thge background.

  9. #29

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    I read the entire thread, but is there something I am missing? Pocket Wizards work the exact same with Minolta cameras as they do with any Nikon or Canon. There is absolutely no difference in function, so what do you mean they don't work with Minoltas as they do with Canons?

    You have a beautiful selection of lenses and the 7 is regarded by many as one of the most ergonomic 35mm bodies ever. If you really insist on dumping all that fine minolta gear give me a PM / Email and I'll take a few of those lenses off of you.

    I'm just a bit confused why no one has mentioned any of that yet.

  10. #30

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    Quote Originally Posted by Shane Knight
    For example, you turn to look at the bride and you smack your camera flash into a child who was below your vision (ouch), or you smack your flash into a door jam, a little here and a little there. When an accident(s) happen, after a while something has to give. The newer metal/stronger hot shoe actually sends the breaking point to your cameras body/shoe loosening it from the camera over time. I had to send my cameras in to have repaired which is more expensive than fixing the shoe on the flash.
    Sorry to hear about your broken camera, but how's the kids head... healing properly I hope.

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