Switch to English Language Passer en langue française Omschakelen naar Nederlandse Taal Wechseln Sie zu deutschen Sprache Passa alla lingua italiana
Members: 70,301   Posts: 1,536,169   Online: 788
      
Page 1 of 2 12 LastLast
Results 1 to 10 of 16
  1. #1

    Join Date
    Feb 2004
    Location
    Lobsta
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    566

    Camera for Copy Work

    I'd like to solicit advice on a camera/viewfinder combination for doing copy work. I'm a bit biased toward Nikon since I still have several Nikon lenses and could use the camera for general photography, too. However, I'm open to suggestions.

    At one time I had access to a friend's F3 and picked up a nice DW-4 6x magnifying finder to use with it. I've considered getting an F3, but having seen some posts about problems regarding it, am having second thoughts. A good F2 with a DW-2 would appear to be a good solution and fits into my Luddite lifestyle.

    Any thoughts? Any idea of what is a reasonable price for an F2/DW-2? Any caveats?

    Thanks,
    Will
    My Verito page

    Anyone can appreciate a fine print. But it takes a real photographer to appreciate a fine negative.

  2. #2

    Join Date
    May 2006
    Location
    Aurora, IL
    Shooter
    35mm
    Posts
    1,951
    I have the F3HP with DW-4 viewfinder and the PB-6 bellow. I found a couple of adapters so that I can mount my enlarging lenses on the bellow. Although I have not use it for copying work but I see no problem with such a setup.

  3. #3

    Join Date
    Jun 2003
    Posts
    1,646
    Images
    5
    Good Morning, Will,

    The camera body is largely irrelevant, especially in 35mm. A good macro lens will, however, make life a lot easier. An accessory focusing rail can also be helpful.

    Luddite?? A 4 x 5 view camera is far more useful and versatile for copying. Using one makes it easier to keep everything squared up. There is also the variance of contrast in the copied originals; being able to adjust processing for individual exposures comes in very handy. The only real disadvantage to using 4 x 5 is that many of the specialized copy films are no longer being produced.

    Konical

  4. #4

    Join Date
    Feb 2004
    Location
    Lobsta
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    566
    Quote Originally Posted by Konical
    A 4 x 5 view camera is far more useful and versatile for copying.
    Agreed, but my output needs to be 35mm for this application.
    My Verito page

    Anyone can appreciate a fine print. But it takes a real photographer to appreciate a fine negative.

  5. #5
    DKT
    DKT is offline

    Join Date
    Sep 2002
    Posts
    504
    will--I use a 4x5 a lot for copywork (at work, on a bencher producer stand), but I have used an F3HP for years as well, and have no problems whatsoever with it....lenses used are the 55 micro 2.8 and a 105 micro-nikkor.

    fwiw, I use the 55 micro & F3 on a chromapro slide duper as well to dupe 4x5 chromes down to 35 with CDUII....never had a problem here either. the F3 is a workhorse camera for the studio, and great on the copystand as well.

  6. #6
    David A. Goldfarb's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2002
    Location
    Honolulu, Hawai'i
    Shooter
    Large Format
    Posts
    17,236
    Images
    20
    The choice of camera doesn't really matter that much. If it has reliable shutter speeds for continuous lighting, that's really the only likely issue. I do copy work with strobes, so the shutter speed isn't even important.

    A few things that are nice conveniences but not essential for shooting 35mm copy slides--

    Motor drive with an electric release, so you can work quickly without introducing camera shake or moving the camera when you wind the film.

    Angle finder or chimney finder so you can focus on a copy stand without having to stand in an awkward position.

    If you have the option of a grid screen, that helps keep everything square.

    Spirit level or laser alignment tool for keeping the camera and the work level on the stand.
    flickr--http://www.flickr.com/photos/davidagoldfarb/
    Photography (not as up to date as the flickr site)--http://www.davidagoldfarb.com/photo
    Academic (Slavic and Comparative Literature)--http://www.davidagoldfarb.com

  7. #7
    TheFlyingCamera's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2005
    Location
    Washington DC
    Shooter
    Large Format
    Posts
    8,312
    Blog Entries
    51
    Images
    434
    I've used my Contax 167mt for doing copy work, with 50 f1.8 or 35 f2.8 lenses (depending on size of original). I sent it in for a repair once and they sent me a free right-angle magnifier finder for some unknown reason. This was always a wonderful combination for doing copy work, as the Contax finders are very bright. Although it is not a true 100% finder, it was close enough that I could count on the slide mount masking to be the same as the viewfinder difference, so I was always spot on with my compositions.

    Another great camera for copy work (if you can find one) is a Minolta XK - it has a 100% finder, interchangeable prisms, like the F2, and it takes the modern Minolta bayonet mount lenses. Highly under-rated.

  8. #8
    narsuitus's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2004
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    547
    Here is what I use for 35mm copy stand work:

    Camera:
    Nikon F2 (black body preferred to reduce unwanted reflections in shiny subjects)
    Type E (has grid lines to assist proper alignment of subject in viewfinder)
    Nikon DW-2 6x Magnifier Finder or
    Nikon DE-1 non-metered viewfinder with Nikon Eyepiece Magnifier DG-2
    MD-1, MD-2, or MD-3 motor drive (primarily for added weight to reduce camera vibrations)

    Lenses:
    105mm f4 short mount
    PB-4 Bellows
    55mm f3.5 macro
    Nikon M2 extension tube
    28mm f3.5 (mounted in reverse position for macro work)
    Nikon BR-2 lens reversal ring
    Nikon K extension set

    Misc:
    Nikon Bellows Slide Copy Attachment PS-4
    Cable Release

  9. #9

    Join Date
    Dec 2004
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    1,670
    My suggestion would be for any SLR body that accepts a right angle finder attachment or a waist level finder. If you are going to make a number of copies then either of these two setups will save you a lot of neck strain.

  10. #10

    Join Date
    Mar 2005
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    3,364
    Hmm. Lotsa answers on cameras and lenses, two mentions so far of a copy stand, a Bencher and "unspecified," to be exact.

    Will, if it isn't obvious to you that any old camera that can be focused through the lens and any old macro or enlarging lens will do, it should be. Or rather, they've all done.

    Positioning the copy and camera matter too. The Bencher stand mentioned is fine. I use the remains of a Polaroid MP-4 with a Nikon and MicroNikkor on the Universal Camera Mount. One of the many nice things about proper copy stands is that they allow lights to be attached. One of my rig's weaknesses is that since I started with a $25 scrap MP-4 baseboard and column I have to improvise lighting.

    Good luck, and remember that you can't do copy work well shooting hand-held,

    Dan
    Last edited by Dan Fromm; 07-19-2006 at 05:17 PM. Click to view previous post history. Reason: typo

Page 1 of 2 12 LastLast


 

APUG PARTNERS EQUALLY FUNDING OUR COMMUNITY:



Contact Us  |  Support Us!  |  Advertise  |  Site Terms  |  Archive  —   Search  |  Mobile Device Access  |  RSS  |  Facebook  |  Linkedin