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  1. #11

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    Quote Originally Posted by Mackinaw
    In the FD mount, Canon only made one TS lens, the 35mm. In the EOS mount, they made three, 24mm, 45mm and 90mm.

    Jim Bielecki
    Dear Jim,

    Thanks for the clarification. This accounts for everyone's confusion.

    Cheers,

    R.

  2. #12
    David A. Goldfarb's Avatar
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    A nice find. The FD 35mm TS lens still fetches $500-700, if you decide not to keep it. As I recall there is a tripod separator for it, so if you have a little plastic block to raise the camera off the tripod, that's what it's for.

    Generally, I think that most people who want to experiment with camera movements would do better with a view camera that will be more versatile and cost less than a TS lens for an SLR, but if you happen to have one of these thrown into your lap, it does let you do things like photograph architecture handheld with front rise. You can also do some view camera tricks like near/far compositions with front tilt at relatively wide apertures or use the "reverse Scheimpflug" technique to create very narrow depth of field. If you want to mimic the rear movements on a view camera, remember you can always tilt or pan the camera.
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  3. #13

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    I do not have a tilt lens. I would conjecture that a tilt/shift lens would allow some perspective,(shape changing), by allowing some angling of the plane to the suject plane, recentering and modifying the plane of focus.

    Poor me, stuck with 2 pc lenses and no tilt.
    Claire (Ms Anne Thrope is in the darkroom)

  4. #14
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    Hi Claire,

    The tilt and shift lenses would not really alter shape per say. They afford the same movement of the front standard on a View camera which will allow maintaining focus along a single plane. Do not forget that the 35mm cameras have a fixed back. With the View Camera by using tilt (and swing) on the rear standard you allow for maintaining focus along the plane, but by moving the film plane in relation to a fixed point will change the shape.

    Rich
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  5. #15

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    I realize that. However it would allow the back to be set at an angle to a plane and then to have the focus corrected with the tilt.

    So, how does this differ from a back swing? Of course the back could be both swung and tilted on a view camera. but it seems to me that the plane of the film being set not parallel to a subject plane would accomplish the same thing. Of course any camera allows the film plane to be offset relative to the subject plane but ordinary lenses would not allow changing the focus plane or shifting.

    A 35mm camera is far from being a view camera. I do not wish to guild the dandelion here.
    Claire (Ms Anne Thrope is in the darkroom)

  6. #16
    David A. Goldfarb's Avatar
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    If you have a camera with front tilt and swing or a T/S lens, you can simulate rear movements indirectly by applying tilt or swing on the lens, tilting the camera to relevel the lens, and using rise/fall or shift to recompose.
    flickr--http://www.flickr.com/photos/davidagoldfarb/
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  7. #17
    naturephoto1's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by David A. Goldfarb
    If you have a camera with front tilt and swing or a T/S lens, you can simulate rear movements indirectly by applying tilt or swing on the lens, tilting the camera to relevel the lens, and using rise/fall or shift to recompose.
    As David has pointed out you can use the indirect rear movement by tilting the camera and apply the direct movements to the lens (as can be done with a large format camera lacking or having insufficient movement). I do not have a tilt and shift lens and have never handled one. The only question that comes to mind is do these lenses have sufficient movement of tilt and shift to make the needed correction. I would presume that they would since less correction is required for 35mm than large format. I could talk to a friend that has the Canon Tilt and shift lenses if need be for confirmation.

    Rich
    Richard A. Nelridge
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  8. #18
    Wally H's Avatar
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    I used the Canon 35mm TS lense a lot in my landscape work as well as the traditional architecture applications. Primarily the 'shift' function. I felt the tilt function did not provide much, (or maybe as much as I wanted), of a focal plane shift in the way I used it. One affect that I had to beware of as compared to my LF lense during shift functions was the light fall off at the outer edges. Pretty normal, but I was used to much larger image circles in the LF lenses I used, (generally having LF lenses with image circles that allowed 100% of the mechanical shift of my view cameras).
    Regards,

    Wally

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  9. #19
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    I have used all of the canon TS lenses, and others adapted for cine applications. There is no real useful application of these lenses in substitution for a view camera, regarding architectural correction, or focus control, other than for visual effect, in other words, blurring some parts of the same focal plane. The limited movement available is very difficult to assess in a reflex viewfinder. I am always amused when comparisons to view camera systems are alluded to with these lenses. Aside from the technical similarity to some of the movements available on the front of a view camera, TS lenses have little in common with view cameras, in actual application.

    That is not to say that they are not useful, or desirable, as quite striking effects can be achieved that would not otherwise be possible. In short they are a lens that is best used for visual effect, rather than technical correction of an image. The latter is possible to some degree, but is hardly precise, and very difficult to achieve.
    Last edited by JBrunner; 09-04-2006 at 02:50 PM. Click to view previous post history.

  10. #20

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    Quote Originally Posted by Mackinaw View Post
    In the FD mount, Canon only made one TS lens, the 35mm. In the EOS mount, they made three, 24mm, 45mm and 90mm.

    Jim Bielecki
    Jim is right about the Canon lenses. Nikon has the PC lenses. Originally Nikon had the 35mm PC and then the 28mm PC. These lenses would only shift and not tilt. The current Nikon is the PC micro 85mm with built in CPU and also has T and S. The wide angle lenses are great for architecture and landscape photography. I find the PC 85mm is perfect for product photography of small parts where you want great depth of field and no distortion. It can't substitute for a view camera but it's a very handy substitute. I still have the Nikon 28 and 85 mm and had the Canon TS 24mm, which I liked, but sold it with all my EOS stuff which I didn't like. (Not intuitive like Nikon, Leica or Pentax).

    Len

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