Switch to English Language Passer en langue française Omschakelen naar Nederlandse Taal Wechseln Sie zu deutschen Sprache Passa alla lingua italiana
Members: 70,943   Posts: 1,557,712   Online: 1213
      
Page 1 of 3 123 LastLast
Results 1 to 10 of 23
  1. #1

    Join Date
    Dec 2005
    Shooter
    35mm
    Posts
    58

    Tilt and Shift Lens

    How do you follow a guy having a Pancake lens.
    When i bought my Canon AE-1 camera from my partnes dad it was a total Camera kit, 3 lenes ETC and he told me that he had one more lens somewhere around the house, he called me yesterday and said he found it.

    He said the lens was called a Tilt and Shift lens, O.K. where do we go from here with a name like that.

    Thanks for any information and have a good and safe holiday.
    Mike.

  2. #2
    Markok765's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2006
    Location
    Ontario, Canada
    Shooter
    Medium Format
    Posts
    2,270
    Blog Entries
    1
    Images
    24
    shift moves the lens up to get everything in the frame without tilting the camera, tilt actually changes the focus plane so say you tilt the lens 45 deg. the focus will be on a 45 degree angle instrad of strainght
    Marko Kovacevic
    Blog
    Youtube

  3. #3

    Join Date
    May 2006
    Location
    Northern Aquitaine
    Shooter
    35mm RF
    Posts
    4,913
    Quote Originally Posted by papisa
    He said the lens was called a Tilt and Shift lens, O.K. where do we go from here with a name like that. Mike.
    It's a way of duplicating large format camera movements. 'Tilt' means that the lens axis can be set at an angle to the subject-camera axis, allowing a receding plane to be kept in focus (Google 'Scheimpflug Rule') and 'shift' means it can be displaced parallel to the image plane, thereby (for example) avoiding the 'falling over backwards' effect that you get when you tilt a camera upwards: as long as the camera back remains parallel to the subhect, there is no 'keystone' distortion.

    TS lenses (I think Canon made them in several focal lengths) are quite rare, valuable and desirable IF you need one and know how to use it. Otherwise they are bulky, slow lenses of limited interest.

    Cheers,

    Roger (www.rogerandfrances.com)

  4. #4
    copake_ham's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2006
    Location
    NYC or Copake or Tucson
    Shooter
    35mm
    Posts
    4,092
    Images
    56
    If I am not mistaken, and I may well be, I think a "tilt and shift" lens would be more commonly known as a "perspective contol" ("PC") lens.

    Mainly used for architectural renderings - it enables one to vary the tilt (angle) between horizontal to vertical while maintaining optical perspective. This compensates for the "converging verticals" effect that otherwise result from a conical lens piece when it is shifted "off" of a direct horizontal (or vertical) plane.

    BTW: if you are digitally inclined (I'm not, but aware...) - PS 9.0x has a PC function....

  5. #5

    Join Date
    May 2006
    Location
    Northern Aquitaine
    Shooter
    35mm RF
    Posts
    4,913
    Quote Originally Posted by copake_ham
    If I am not mistaken, and I may well be, I think a "tilt and shift" lens would be more commonly known as a "perspective contol" ("PC") lens.....
    Dear George,

    Canon's TS series also incorporate a tilt facility in addition to the normal shift of a PC, hence the TS name. The tilt facility is often more useful with close-ups than with architecture, which as you say is the principal application of a conventional shift lens.

    Cheers,

    Roger

  6. #6
    copake_ham's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2006
    Location
    NYC or Copake or Tucson
    Shooter
    35mm
    Posts
    4,092
    Images
    56
    Quote Originally Posted by Roger Hicks
    Dear George,

    Canon's TS series also incorporate a tilt facility in addition to the normal shift of a PC, hence the TS name. The tilt facility is often more useful with close-ups than with architecture, which as you say is the principal application of a conventional shift lens.

    Cheers,

    Roger
    As you say, Roger.....

  7. #7
    Dan Henderson's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2005
    Location
    Blue Ridge, Virginia, USA
    Shooter
    4x5 Format
    Posts
    1,891
    Images
    241
    hmmm...and all this time I thought "PC" meant "politically correct." Although "perspective control" does have a certain metaphorical attraction....sorry, just an early morning musing.


    web site: Dan Henderson, Photographer.com

    blog: https://danhendersonphotographer.wordpress.com/

    I am not anti-digital. I am pro-film.

  8. #8

    Join Date
    Jan 2006
    Location
    Norfolk, UK
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    250
    If I remember correctly it came in 2 focal lengths, 35 and ?85mm. A colleague of mine had a 35 for use with his Canon F1 – he photographed architects' models with it. Even then (25 years ago) it was a rare and expensive beastie – cost as much as a new Sinar probably!

    He also had a kind of rigid endoscope thing that he used to photograph the models from _inside_. Now that really was exotic.


    Richard

  9. #9

    Join Date
    May 2006
    Location
    Northern Aquitaine
    Shooter
    35mm RF
    Posts
    4,913
    Quote Originally Posted by Richard Kelham
    If I remember correctly it came in 2 focal lengths, 35 and ?85mm.
    Richard
    Dear Richard,

    I half had it in mind that there were three, but those two lengths do sound likelier.

    Cheers,

    Roger

  10. #10

    Join Date
    Jan 2005
    Location
    One hour south of the Mackinaw Bridge
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    322
    In the FD mount, Canon only made one TS lens, the 35mm. In the EOS mount, they made three, 24mm, 45mm and 90mm.

    Jim Bielecki

Page 1 of 3 123 LastLast


 

APUG PARTNERS EQUALLY FUNDING OUR COMMUNITY:



Contact Us  |  Support Us!  |  Advertise  |  Site Terms  |  Archive  —   Search  |  Mobile Device Access  |  RSS  |  Facebook  |  Linkedin