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  1. #1

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    looking for some 35mm cans

    i am seeking where the heck i can find some 35mm reloadable cans or whatever they are called? canisters?containers? im not sure what they are but i am looking for them, the cannisters u put inside your camera, the rolls or whatever, i am looking for the metal ones that are reusable
    please post if u can help me
    im a newbie to this game
    thanks...

  2. #2
    Stephanie Brim's Avatar
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    You're looking for cartridges. Freestyle has them and so do J&C, IIRC. You can also get them at B&H and Adorama. Or you can find them for a good deal on Ebay once in a while, but you can't be sure of the quality of those. I'd buy new.
    No idea what's going to happen next, but I'm hoping it involves being wrist deep in chemicals come the weekend.

  3. #3
    Mike Wilde's Avatar
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    Once you get them, keep them

    Cassettes, as I call them, can last if treated well. Keep them in a plastic film can when not in use.

    I have a stock of about 40 that are over 25 years old - some I have modified with sandpaper/xacto sracthing the paint away to match the needed contacts to 'dx code' them for use in the ocasional modern camera that comes my way. I found the DX coding standard on the web somewhere.

    I vaccuum the felt from the outside with a crevice tool before bulk loading to work on getting any nacent cruddies out of the way before sliding the new film through it.

    Try to buy the metal ones; I have tried the plastic ones with twist off bottoms and I do not like them as well. The ones I had have more felt on them than the OEM fiolm cans from the likes of Kodak.

    A couple of years ago I bought 20 metal ones branded 'Kalt" from Henry's in Toronto. They are not DX coded, but have an excellent pop off bottom with a continuous groove that holds them on.

    Sometimes you see DX coding stickers - not sure if they are new , or old stock kicking around, in a well stocked 'old school' camera store.

  4. #4

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    Another option is to re-use the cartridges that come with factory-loaded film. If you develop your own film, you can unload the cartridge out the film path, leaving a centimeter or so of film protruding. You can then tape your bulk film end to this protruding bit of film and reload the cartridge. You can do the same thing with cartridges you obtain for free from minilabs; most will happily give you whatever they happen to have on hand, since it's just garbage to them. For more information on this approach, including photos of how to attach the film, see this photo.net discussion.

    This approach has the advantages of being cheap and providing DX coding (depending on the cartridges you use). The drawbacks are that it's harder to avoid fogging the end of the film (I personally can't attach the film in the dark, as I can when attaching it directly to the spindle of a re-usable cartridge) and, if you use minilab cartridges, you don't know where they've been, so they could be dusty and scratch your film.

  5. #5

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    Be careful, some reloadable cassettes are very flimsy being made of very thin metal. Others are hard to get the caps snapped back on. The ones with the Kalt name are good. Years ago Kodak made the very best of very heavy metal. Sometimes you can find them in older camera stores. Picked up a dozen a couple of years ago still in their original boxes.

  6. #6
    Andy K's Avatar
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    Don't know your location, but Firstcall Photographic sell them. Plain and DX Coded.


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  7. #7

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    im in the united states, northern california to be exact
    cool well thank you all for helping im gonna do some homework and chek it out

  8. #8

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    Quote Originally Posted by Andy K View Post
    Don't know your location, but Firstcall Photographic sell them. Plain and DX Coded.
    Andy. Have you had complete successe with these? I had a thread on bulk loading some weeks ago because I was having trouble getting my pentax MZ7 to fully rewind the film loaded into Jessops re-usable cassettes(plastic).

    I just cannot figure out why this should be. They load OK and wind forward OK. When developed the spacing is fine too but on rewind the film sticks in the cassette. Not a problem if the darkroom is handy because I open the back and close it again and it rewinds a few more frames. Sometimes I have to do this a couple of times until it eventually rewinds the whole cassette.

    Opening the back is not practical if I want to change the film when shooting. I have now used three of the 6 cassettes( bought brand new) and all exhibit the same problem.

    It isn't the camera as it will faultlessly rewind shop bought cassettes.

    What does cure the problem is firing the whole roll a couple of times with the cap on and rewinding each time, then retrieiving the end of the film, reloading etc. It is as if it frees the film in the cassette which then runs freely enought to rewind. It might not be a problem if I had manual rewind but this isn't an option with the MZ7. I can't keep on going through this rigmarole.

    I wondered if I wasn't attaching the film straight on the spindle and it was rubbing the end of the spindle so tried to attach it very carefully the other night but it wasn't any better.

    The spindle in the cassettes when empty spins fine and when loading into the camera seems to come out of the cassette about as easily as a shop bought cassette.

    I am running out of ideas as to what is going wrong. Maybe it is the Jessops' cassettes hence my question about the Firstcall ones.

    Any ideas from you or others will be gratefully received. Last time I raised this problem no-one else seemed to have experienced this problem. It's lonely when you are in a population of one!

    Thanks
    pentaxuser

  9. #9
    Andy K's Avatar
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    Hi P,
    I haven't tried the Firstcall metal cassettes yet. I have some on order along with a second bulk loader, but because the loader is out of stock the order won't complete until the end of the month. (Btw, they do a GREAT deal on plastic cassttes, which is useful as it makes them almost disposable after a few uses)

    As for as the plastic cassttes go I have only once experienced one which was hard to rewind. But the same cassette was hard to load as well. I am not sure but I think the spindle was slightly oversize lengthwise. I sanded a couple of mil off the long end and the problem never happened again.


    -----------My Flickr-----------
    Anáil nathrach, ortha bháis is beatha, do chéal déanaimh.

  10. #10

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    Quote Originally Posted by pentaxuser View Post
    Andy. Have you had complete successe with these? I had a thread on bulk loading some weeks ago because I was having trouble getting my pentax MZ7 to fully rewind the film loaded into Jessops re-usable cassettes(plastic).
    I've noticed that the re-usable plastic cassettes I bought from (IIRC) B&H take much more effort to rewind than do most metal cassettes. I can feel this when manually rotating the film in the spool with my hand. I don't know the precise cause of this effect, but it's probably either friction from the spindle on the cassette or friction from a film opening that's narrower than that of metal cassets. If the same is true for you, my hunch is that the extra force is simply beyond the capacity of your camera's rewind motor. I don't know the details of how the wind and rewind operations work on motorized cameras, but I wouldn't be surprised if they'd have different tolerances for resistance in the two directions -- or it could be that the friction on the cassette is different in the two directions.

    In any event, the solution is simple: Switch to another type of cassette. You might not like having to give up cassettes for which you paid good money, but it's better that than suffering from reduced utility because of the problem. Perhaps you can arrange a trade with somebody who's got some metal cassettes but prefers plastic ones.

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