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  1. #21
    JBrunner's Avatar
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    Ok,

    The numbers you are referring to are shutter speeds-

    B stands for "bulb" and it is behaving correctly, and is for making long exposures, for example on a tripod at night where your exposure might be 15 seconds or something. A tripod and a cable release would let you accomplish an exposure like this without the camera wiggling.
    1 means 1 sec
    2 means 1/2 sec
    4 means 1/4 sec
    8 means 1/8 sec
    and so on down to 1/2000 sec

    If you wish to make your stop of 4.5 the priority setting, ie you are choosing that stop for some reason (in your case you have wanted a pronounced bokeh effect) then you would adjust the shutter speeds to get the green light. What need to do is get the correct shutter speed/aperture combination for the ISO of your film. When you adjust the ISO setting to something other than the speed of your film, you are just lying to the camera about the films sensitivity to light. (ISO refers to the films sensitivity, 50 ISO 1/2 as sensitive as 100, 200 is twice as sensitive as 100, and so on, 1/2 and double are what stops, film speeds, and shutter speeds are about, so 400 ISO is 2 stops more sensitive, or as we say, faster than 100) So if you are shooting 400 speed film the ISO needs to be set on 400, and stay there. The shot that turned out was a happenstance. There are films that have ISO's don't exactly correspond like 320 for example, but don't worry about them right now. Also you will run across the acronym "ASA" at some point. ASA and ISO mean essentialy the same thing.

    Advanced photographers sometime rate film at different ISO's than the box speed, but at this stage of the game for you, consider it non negotiable, later as you begin to understand exposure, you can develop your own film speeds.

    For now, set your ISO to the box speed and adjust your exposure with shutter speed and /or aperture to get the green light.

    Also, on APUG its not cool to photoshop a picture to "black and white":o . If you want to shoot black and white, use black and white film. Since you don't have a darkroom (yet), you can use a C41 process B&W like IlfordXP2 or Kodak PortraNC. Those films can be processed and printed just like color negative film.

    You will find that there is a gulf of difference between B&W and a digitally desaturated color image, which is not B&W at all, but desaturated color. (for example with many B&W films red might expose as black, but with digital (blrgg gghhh, threw up in my mouth a little) desaturation it will be light gray. This is because black and white films render tones more according to spectral sensitivity(color), rather than lumenance(brightness) although both factor in.

    The general rule on APUG is that you can use photoshop to clean up a scan, and tweak it to look the as close to the print as possible, but digital manipulations that fundamentally alter the appearance of the image are not cool.

    So set that ISO correctly, use your shutter and aperture to set the exposure, and shoot the next roll!!!
    Last edited by JBrunner; 11-12-2006 at 09:56 AM. Click to view previous post history.

  2. #22

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    Quote Originally Posted by dana44 View Post
    I know what the ISO speeds are, but wtf is the other numbers:

    B 1 2 4 8 15 30 60 125 (which is in RED) 250 500 1000 2000

    I have to kinda pull up on the knob to select my ISO, but I really don't know what the other numbers are.. and my stupid local book store has nothing on photography.

    Also, is it bad to play with the ISO settings alot while taking pictures? I take pictures ranging from BRIGHT SUNLIGHT.. to dimmer situations such as woods.

    Another thing, when I put it on the B setting, The shutter stays open as long as I hold the button down.. .and closes when I let go.. is this bad?

    Sorry.. I am a really big newbie to Manual cameras.. I have the basic idea of how to use them...

    I've just been changing the ISO according to the light meter.. when it's green I snap the picture
    B~2000 are the shutter speeds. B=bulb, 1=1 sec., 2000=1/2000 sec.

    Set your ISO and don't change it during a roll, at least not yet. :-) Changing the ISO will quickly lead to over/under-exposed negatives. Change your aperture and/or shutter speed to get correct metering.

    Two things you might do:

    1. Check the local library. They often have photo books and that part of the collection is usually 5~10 years old, so there should be some books on manual stuff.

    2. See: www.silverlight.co.uk/tutorials/toc.html
    JeffW.

  3. #23

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    One more detail: The fact that "125" is in red on the shutter speed dial probably indicates that this is the flash sync speed. With most SLRs, you must use a shutter speed of a particular value or slower for correct flash sync; if you try to use a faster shutter speed, only part of the frame will be properly exposed. This is because the flash pulse is so fast that it requires the shutter to be completely open to expose the film evenly, and at fast shutter speeds, the entire frame is never exposed simultaneously; there's a moving "slit" of exposure.

    You can certainly use the 1/125s speed for non-flash exposures, so for the moment you can just ignore the fact that the "125" is in red. If and when you get a flash, though, be sure to use it with the camera set to 1/125s or slower (1/60s, 1/30s, etc., should all work, but in most cases people use the fastest possible shutter speed for flash).

  4. #24

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    Quote Originally Posted by Elox View Post
    B~2000 are the shutter speeds. B=bulb, 1=1 sec., 2000=1/2000 sec.

    Set your ISO and don't change it during a roll, at least not yet. :-) Changing the ISO will quickly lead to over/under-exposed negatives. Change your aperture and/or shutter speed to get correct metering.

    Two things you might do:

    1. Check the local library. They often have photo books and that part of the collection is usually 5~10 years old, so there should be some books on manual stuff.

    2. See: www.silverlight.co.uk/tutorials/toc.html

    I really do need a book, okay, So I should just set my ISO to 400 (which is the rate of my film) and change the settings one the b 1 2 4 deal? I really hate to seem like such a stupid-food.. but I just got this camera, and I have a photoshoot this Weekend I wanna take it too.


    And.. Sorry for photoshopping the picture black and white, heh, I just bought the film in a hurry so I could test the camera out. I plan on buying black-and-white film..and then eventually making my own darkroom

  5. #25
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    Quote Originally Posted by dana44 View Post
    And.. Sorry for photoshopping the picture black and white, heh, I just bought the film in a hurry so I could test the camera out. I plan on buying black-and-white film..and then eventually making my own darkroom
    Don't worry about posting a colour photograph here - one or two of us here are known to prefer them that way .

    Good luck, happy learning, and have fun!

    Matt

  6. #26

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    Another thing you might try is playing with the camera simulator at:

    http://www.photonhead.com/simcam/

    This shows the basic interaction between film speed, aperture, and shutter speed.
    JeffW.

  7. #27
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    Quote Originally Posted by dana44 View Post
    I really do need a book, okay, So I should just set my ISO to 400 (which is the rate of my film) and change the settings one the b 1 2 4 deal? I really hate to seem like such a stupid-food.. but I just got this camera, and I have a photoshoot this Weekend I wanna take it too.


    And.. Sorry for photoshopping the picture black and white, heh, I just bought the film in a hurry so I could test the camera out. I plan on buying black-and-white film..and then eventually making my own darkroom
    Yes, set the ISO to your film speed, and leave it there. Achieve your exposure by adjusting the shutter (the b 1 2 4 deal) or the aperture (the 2.8,4,5.6,8,11 deal), or some combination of both.

  8. #28

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    I took everyones advice and did just that.. Set it back to 400, changed the shutter speed and aparture, I have one simple question:

    Okay, I play with the settings, the light goes green, I take the picture, but the exposure seems a little long for broad-daylight ?????? I hope I am not wasting film. heh

  9. #29

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    Quote Originally Posted by dana44 View Post
    Okay, I play with the settings, the light goes green, I take the picture, but the exposure seems a little long for broad-daylight ?????? I hope I am not wasting film. heh
    We'd need to know the aperture, shutter speed, film speed, and local lighting conditions to offer opinions on that. Of these four factors, you've only mentioned the film speed and strongly hinted at the lighting conditions. One useful rule of thumb is the "sunny 16" rule: In full daylight (no clouds, no shade), set the aperture to f/16 and the shutter speed to the reciprocal of the film speed (for instance, 1/400s for ISO 400 film). In practice, of course, most cameras lack a 1/400s setting, so you'd probably use 1/500s or 1/250s. In extreme northern or southern latitudes, this rule may be a stop or so optimistic even in broad daylight. The required exposure also goes up surprisingly rapidly when you move into shade, cloudy conditions, the time after sunrise or before sunset, etc.

  10. #30

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    Quote Originally Posted by srs5694 View Post
    We'd need to know the aperture, shutter speed, film speed, and local lighting conditions to offer opinions on that. Of these four factors, you've only mentioned the film speed and strongly hinted at the lighting conditions. One useful rule of thumb is the "sunny 16" rule: In full daylight (no clouds, no shade), set the aperture to f/16 and the shutter speed to the reciprocal of the film speed (for instance, 1/400s for ISO 400 film). In practice, of course, most cameras lack a 1/400s setting, so you'd probably use 1/500s or 1/250s. In extreme northern or southern latitudes, this rule may be a stop or so optimistic even in broad daylight. The required exposure also goes up surprisingly rapidly when you move into shade, cloudy conditions, the time after sunrise or before sunset, etc.

    I usually Keep it wide open.. But today I was using it at about 11.. I don't exactly remember. I need to get used to using manual camera. I am using ISO 400 film, (which is set correctly) and it was 3PM no clouds, no shade ( I was taking pictures of the power lines) I live in Georgia, southeast USA. lol

    sorry I can't give detials. tomorrow i will do that

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