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  1. #21

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    sounds like a mechanical fault internally, or the film/camera spool is binding up. this would make the camera think it reached the end of the role. i could be wrong but first thing i would do is return it to the store. good luck

  2. #22

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    My Elan 7N automatically fully loads whatever film I put in, and when I've finished with the roll, it'll automatically rewind everything into the film spool. I've enabled it to leave out the film leaver since I sometimes do a mid-roll rewind, but it's never done what you've said before.

  3. #23

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    Electronic gremlins... This is why I prefer my cameras to be of the mechanical variety. The job of a camera is conceptually very simple: hold the film in a light-tight container, open the shutter for a particular duration, move film on one frame. Repeat until end of film, then rewind. What does one gain by handing over any of the above to electronics? In my opinion, nothing whatsoever. And one stands to lose a lot, as evidenced by your N55 experience.

    Get a mechanical camera. They're cheap and plentiful on the used market, vastly higher in materials and build quality, and do the camera's job so close to perfectly that it's not worth worrying about their individual flaws and drawbacks. If you still want a Nikon after your N55 problems try an FM2N.

  4. #24

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    Dana's experiance seems to be more of an exception than the rule. Newer cameras don't have decades of wear and tear. No light leaks, dirt who knows where including the ground glass screen, and other little things that don't work.

  5. #25

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    So if I get good glass for the Canon EOS Rebel K2, or Nikkon F55, will it be worth a damn?

  6. #26
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    Quote Originally Posted by dana44 View Post
    So if I get good glass for the Canon EOS Rebel K2, or Nikkon F55, will it be worth a damn?
    One of the things that you will eventually discover, is that to a great extent, the camera body you get will matter very little.

    A rugged, flexible and adaptable body will end up lasting you for a longer time, and will open opportunities to you to do specialized tasks that other, more basic bodies might not, but it is a difference of degree only.

    If either of these bodies fit well in your hands, and seem to intuitively respond to what you want to do, than you should seriously consider buying them.

    The real question is - will they aid you in developing your vision, and will you enjoy using them to create photographs? If they will, they are truly great investments!

    If you have the opportunity to handle and try a variety of choices - I would suggest you do so. Once you choose something, after taking a bunch of photographs, you may want to change, but you will have learned a lot.

    If you put good glass on your first choice, you are more likely to be able to re-use it. I would be careful, however, about looking to APUG to advise you about the best choice of camera systems - you might end up with 3 or 4! .

    Please understand, this advice comes from someone who, at 17, had had two 35mm cameras - a Kodak 35, and a Kodak Retina S1.

    By 18, I had an Olympus OM1 (not OM1-MD, just an OM1) plus 3 lenses. They didn't make me a better photographer than my Kodak 35 or my Retina S1, just a more flexible and adaptable one. My skill and "eye" didn't (doesn't) come from my cameras, but rather from my experiences and my exposure to the work and feedback of others.

    My advice - get your hands on something that is reasonably likely to be reliable and dependable and give quality results, and take, evaluate and share lots of photography. With the current cost of quality used equipment, once you are sufficiently experienced, it won't be all that difficult to switch, if you need to do so.

    Enjoy the process, and the results - have fun!

    Matt
    Last edited by MattKing; 02-03-2007 at 01:44 AM. Click to view previous post history.

  7. #27

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    I have had a couple of Rebel's over the years, as back up cameras to better Canon cameras that I owned at that time. I gave them away to family members not long after buying them (silly, wasteful me), because I got so frustrated having to turn on the camera just to "preview" a possible shot. Also, they ate batteries like crazy. Eventually I sold the Canons and switched over Nikon FM2n's because they only use batteries for metering (and even then, the battery lasts a long, long time), and when I want to preview a shot, I only have to pick up a camera and remove the lens cap.

    Also, with the Rebels, looking through the viewfinder was like looking through a long dark tunnel, whereas the Nikon FM2n viewfinder is big, bright, and direct. With my aging eyes, I thought I might miss the auto focus, but actually I find that it's easier to focus with the bright Nikon screen than to try to find the little focusing marks in the tiny Rebel viewfinder/screen.

    Just my opinion, but food for thought.

    Pat

  8. #28
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    Quote Originally Posted by PatTrent View Post
    I have had a couple of Rebel's over the years, as back up cameras to better Canon cameras that I owned at that time. I gave them away to family members not long after buying them (silly, wasteful me), because I got so frustrated having to turn on the camera just to "preview" a possible shot.
    I don't understand, presumably because I have never really handled one of these cameras. You can't just look through the viewfinder and see what you're getting? Or do you mean something different by "preview"?

  9. #29

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    Quote Originally Posted by Chazzy View Post
    I don't understand, presumably because I have never really handled one of these cameras. You can't just look through the viewfinder and see what you're getting? Or do you mean something different by "preview"?
    Yes you can just remove the lens cap. I think he means previewing an in focus shot. Autofocus only works with the camera on. Of course he could have just flipped a switch to turn on manual focusing

  10. #30
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    Quote Originally Posted by reub2000 View Post
    Yes you can just remove the lens cap. I think he means previewing an in focus shot. Autofocus only works with the camera on. Of course he could have just flipped a switch to turn on manual focusing
    Now it makes sense to me. I've never used an auto-focus SLR.

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