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  1. #11

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    Quote Originally Posted by film_guy View Post
    Is weather-sealing really important in a film camera? I can understand why it's important to digital SLRs with their electronic circuits and sensor, but is it as useful on an analog camera?

    Anyone brought their non weather-sealed film SLRs out in light rain before and survived? And how much "abuse" from bad weather can a weather-sealed film SLR like the EOS 3 take before it stops working?

    A lot depends on the intensity of the rain. During the monsoon in the Himalayas I have seen a metre-bore drainage pipe (near enough 40 inch diameter) spurting water 2-3 metres (call it 7-10 feet): probably at least a tonne (bigger than a 2000-lb short ton, smaller than a 2240-lb long ton) per second.

    During the monsoon, I used to tape my Nikon Fs with masking tape: enough to keep the water out, and easy to remove. My Leicas, I just keep under the cyclists' rain-cape except when I am usng them.

    Brian's point about 'whose camera' is also important. I once used a Pentax autofocus/autoexposure SLR on an English Channel sea-front (3 metres/10 feet from the sea) during a storm where spray was blowing maybe 70 metres/200 feet inland. It functioned perfectly. It was a loaner from Pentax UK...

    Cheers,

    R.

  2. #12

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    I found that film cameras handle inclement weather well. Change film in dry area and wipe filter (good reason to use filters) and camera down frequently. Try to use cover. Extreme cold weather (artic conditions) does have some affect on the camera and film. In retrospect these cameras appear to have been designed to work under adverse conditions.

  3. #13

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    I have Nikon F, F2A, and F3HP cameras. Over the years all have been exposed to wet weather of varying kinds. None have flinched.

    This is one of the main reasons for purchasing a Nikon or Canon professional body.

  4. #14

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    Note the weather sealed cameras contain electronics. The crop of sealed AF cameras are nearly as electronic as a DSLR.

    There's fairly few sealed non-AF bodies. The LX, the F3 (to a lesser extent) and that's about it as far as I'm aware. The less the camera relies on electronics, the less critical the sealing.

  5. #15

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    Well if it rains a hood and a filter are desirable as water on an lens can capillary and water inside a lens is a pain even if you have a lens spanner.

    J8M on kievs will capilliary trust me, filter on if it is more then drizzle.

    noel
    Last edited by Xmas; 02-14-2007 at 02:06 PM. Click to view previous post history. Reason: bud spellung

  6. #16

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    A lot depends on whether you've been earning good Karma.
    A droplet of water in the wrong place will corrode an insignificant lever or contact internally and, though repairable doesn't always show up immediately.
    The Canon AE1 has a six part switch in it that is a royal PITA to clean of corrosion or tarnish.
    Expletive Deleted!

  7. #17

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    As long as we're telling war stories...

    I trusted Nikon F and F2 bodies more than any others. I remember shooting an afternoon college football game in a rainstorm that was blowing so hard I couldn't keep anything dry, including my skin under my clothes. I returned to the photo lab, removed the backs, prisms and lenses from the cameras, put them in a large film dryer until they were dry, reassembled them and shot an evening college football game in another rainstorm. The cameras never missed a shot.

    Unfortunately, experiences with my new Nikon F3 under mildly damp conditions were total disasters. I was soured on camera electronics for many years because of that camera. Nowadays, an F5/F6 or EOS 1n/1v (or the previously mentioned Pentax model) wouldn't be a problem due to better sealing and more reliable electronics.

  8. #18

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    Anyone brought their film cameras (Nikon F-series and Canon 1 and 3 series) out in anywhere from -5 to -28 celsius winter with a relatively light snow storm before and survived? I'm thinking of doing some late Winter shooting, and the weather here has been really unpredictable. We had 3 and half days of sudden non-stop snow, and then light ice-rain for the next 2 days.

  9. #19

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    It never gets that cold around here so I have no experience with cold weather shooting. I do remember reading an article in "Popular Photography" from 1998 or 1999 in which the nature photo columnist at the time took an Antarctica photo tour. He took along a manual Leica rangefinder as a backup to Canon EOS 1n bodies in case the cold weather presented problems with the electronics. The EOS bodies worked throughout the trip with no problems. Conversely, I've also read of National Geographic photographers using top-of-the-line Nikon and Canon electronic cameras in areas with high heat and humidity with no difficulties.

    I would suspect low temperatures would drain batteries faster than normal.

  10. #20

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    Yeah, I know about the low temperature low battery problem. I'm just worried about moisture entering the film chamber, and affecting the whole roll of exposed film. Or worst, moisture entering the shutter or auto focus mechanism.

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