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  1. #11
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    Quote Originally Posted by TheFlyingCamera View Post
    All Canon EOS lenses are capable of being manually focused in addition to auto-focusing. You just have to switch the lens into manual-focus mode. Before you go bashing the build quality of EOS lenses, try handling some of the L-series lenses with cast metal bodies. Or even the black-bodied L-series lenses. They have metal chassis and lensmounts. Just because something is metal doesn't mean it is automatically superior, and just because something is less-automated doesn't mean it is inferior either.
    So how is the manual focusing done? Does the ring control the motor or does it actually focus the lens. I didn't mean to bash them, I just don't know. If you use them and say they are durable then that is good to know.

  2. #12
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    Quote Originally Posted by reub2000 View Post
    This article contains some good information on using non-canon lenses on EOS cameras.
    Lots of good info there! Thank you for the link.

  3. #13
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    BTW: If one WERE to start up with a fresh 35mm FILM based system, are there any current METAL, MANUAL 35mm SLR cameras?

    I guess I am answering my own question with a trip to the B&H site. They show:

    Vivitar 3800 (K-mount)
    Nikon FM-10 (Nikon mount)
    Bessaflex (Screw mount)
    (any others out there?)
    Of the three I am not shure which, if any are metal.

    I guess I could ask the same question for 35mm RANGEFINDERS.

    At the B&H site I got:

    Leica M
    Various Bessas
    Zeiss
    Rollei RF 35
    Nikon S3
    (They don't make the manual focus Contax any more?)
    Any I left out?

    Looks like the rangefinder offerings are quite good but the SLRs are kind of 'beginner' or 'student' cameras.

  4. #14

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    Quote Originally Posted by ic-racer View Post
    So how is the manual focusing done? Does the ring control the motor or does it actually focus the lens. I didn't mean to bash them, I just don't know. If you use them and say they are durable then that is good to know.
    On the 85 f/1.2L the focus is fly-by-wire. Otherwise, on all of the other lenses the focusing ring is mechanically linked to the focusing group on the lens.

  5. #15

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    Looks like the rangefinder offerings are quite good but the SLRs are kind of 'beginner' or 'student' cameras.
    Manual focus SLRs are really just being manufactured for students right now, because that's who uses them. Rangefinders are nice cameras and make excellent walk around cameras. The used market is saturated with manual focus SLRs. Pick up something like an Olympus OM.

  6. #16
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    Quote Originally Posted by reub2000 View Post
    Pick up something like an Olympus OM.
    I already have a 'vintage' Rollei system that I love and plenty of vintage mechanical cameras, including a mint OM1. The reason to buy more cameras/lenses would be to go to a system that is currently in production, assuming there would be some solitude in thiking it could be repaired/replace if it breaks.

  7. #17
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    Quote Originally Posted by reub2000 View Post
    On the 85 f/1.2L the focus is fly-by-wire. Otherwise, on all of the other lenses the focusing ring is mechanically linked to the focusing group on the lens.
    I may have to go to the store and try one out. I do have an auto focus digital that makes me nauseated to try and use. I got it only for documentation and internet posting (http://www.apug.org/forums/437328-post428.html)

  8. #18

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    Quote Originally Posted by ic-racer View Post
    I may have to go to the store and try one out. I do have an auto focus digital that makes me nauseated to try and use. I got it only for documentation and internet posting (http://www.apug.org/forums/437328-post428.html)
    AF on an SLR is different than the autofocus on point and shoot cameras. Generally you have more options, making it easier to control the autofocus. The autofocus sensor can be selected, and by half pressing the shutter button, you can focus and recompose.

  9. #19

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    Quote Originally Posted by ic-racer View Post
    After using this camera for a while I am getting more used to it. It actually is a little more sophistocated than the Fuji 701 I had in 1973. The SL 35M has open aperture metereing vs the stop-down metering of the 701. Also the SL35M shows the aperture in the viewfinder whereas the 701 did not.

    The think I really did not like about the SL35M was its resemblance to the Zenit-E. My parents got me a Zenit-E for Christmas in 1972 and my brother got an OM-1. I almost cried I was so upset. The SL35M has the same dimensions and the same "Ker-Thunk" from the shutter as the Zenit-E. At least the shutter speed dial doesn't spin as the shutter fires.

    My first two rolls of film came out fine. The meter works OK and I am using it with the Zinc/Air batteries and it seems to be close to my other cameras.
    The SL35M is a plastic Zeiss Icarex, produced shortly after the Icarex was discontinued. Same meter, focusing screen and shutter sound. Rollei lens mount of course.
    Mark
    Mark Layne
    Nova Scotia
    and Barbados

  10. #20

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    Quote Originally Posted by ic-racer View Post
    Here is a link to one of these adapters. It would be nice if someone that has used one of these could comment on it.http://cgi.ebay.com/Rollei-Lens-to-C...QQcmdZViewItem
    I have a similar EOS/QBM adapter I purchased from eBay a few years ago. My late father was a big Rollei SLR fan and left me a number of lenses, which I use regularly on my EOS digital and film bodies. The adapter is dead simple to use and works well, particularly if you already enjoy fully manual focus and metering.

    My last Rollei SLR (also an SL-35E) up and died recently so the adapter is the only way I currently use these lenses. The only problem I've had so far is when using the Planar 50/1.8 on a film body. When set to infinity, the flange around the rear element extends just far enough into the body to catch the mirror. None of the other lenses I've tested has had this problem and it might well be design flaw with this particular older adapter.

    Quote Originally Posted by ic-racer View Post
    In terms of EOS cameras, there does not seem to be a manual/metal camera in the line. The F1 series has a different mount and I suspect this adapter will not work with those cameras.
    No, it won't work with an old FD-mount body. It's true that EOS cameras aren't metal bodied but they are darn sturdy, especially the professional and semi-pro models with a full metal frame and metal lens mount. They've been around for about 20 years now and a lot of the early bodies and lenses are still in use. I just bought an older Canon EOS 630 (made in 1989) for $40. This model has interchangeable focus screens (see KEH) so I can insert a standard split prism screen in place of the clear autofocus screen standard with the camera.

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