Switch to English Language Passer en langue française Omschakelen naar Nederlandse Taal Wechseln Sie zu deutschen Sprache Passa alla lingua italiana
Members: 71,564   Posts: 1,573,393   Online: 896
      
Page 3 of 9 FirstFirst 123456789 LastLast
Results 21 to 30 of 87
  1. #21

    Join Date
    Oct 2004
    Location
    Near Tavistock, Devon, on the edge of Dartmoor.
    Shooter
    35mm
    Posts
    1,051
    Quote Originally Posted by reub2000 View Post
    Autofocus is usually spot on most of the time.
    "Usually" and "most" - there's the rub!

    For me, it's in the same bracket as automatic exposure (or even automatic transmission in cars!)

    The purist, I suspect, will always want to have full control over what his machine is doing, but perhaps with some types of photography (sport, reportage, nature, etc.) that "full control" includes the option to decide to use auto-everything!

    Steve

  2. #22
    eddym's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2006
    Location
    Puerto Rico
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    1,927
    Images
    26
    Quote Originally Posted by DWThomas View Post
    My autofocus experience is pretty limited, but one reaction is that I like manual focus because it stays where I put it! I have gotten into some quasi-still life work -- photographing paintings, sculpture or pottery. Especially on unglazed greenware pottery where there isn't much in the way of defined patterns and edges, AF hunts all over the place, sometimes for quite a long time, then when I put the next piece down, we start all over again.
    I've solved this problem with my Nikons by disabling the autofocus feature on the shutter release button and instead using the AF button on the back of the camera. Now I can point the sensor at the area I want to focus on, push the button, release it, recompose and shoot. It's very fast, and is basically what I would do when I focus manually, and the focus does not change unless I push the AF button again.
    Eddy McDonald
    www.fotoartes.com
    Eschew defenestration!

  3. #23

    Join Date
    Oct 2004
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    726
    No shutter lag, especially with rangefinders, but for me, the fact that many AF lenses don't have depth of field scales makes them completely unusable as my work tends to need fairly large areas to be in focus, rather than specific points.

    David.

  4. #24
    rogueish's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2004
    Location
    3rd Rock
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    877
    I found it to be a slightly annoying function on my Nikon, so I turned it off. Generally I do vignettes of landscapes, so don't need it, don't use it, don't miss it. Don't get me wrong, I'm not putting it down, just not something I find has added value for me.
    Batteries lasting twice as long in the winter months is an added bonus.

  5. #25
    benjiboy's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2005
    Location
    U.K.
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    7,048
    Since my main interest is portrait photography, and I always focus on the nearest eye of the sitter, I would personally find autofocus about as useful as an ashtray on a motor bike.
    Ben

  6. #26
    jmailand's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2004
    Location
    Belmont Michigan
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    151
    Images
    20
    I started out with manual focus, I have lost very few shots because of focus. I think a depth of field scale or preview switch for me is more important. I have ruined more shots because of a too narrow focus range. I have a couple newer Minolta Maxxums I picked up reasonably cheap since the digital explosion. If I'm going to shoot kids or sports, I might use them because my nieces and nephews move around a lot, but thats very rare for me. Most of the time my subjects don't move very much so I stick with the older manual focus cameras because my lense for them are superior to the zooms my Minolta has. Also the batteries if present last much longer.

    James,

  7. #27

    Join Date
    Jan 2005
    Location
    Japan
    Shooter
    35mm
    Posts
    1,957
    The newer 35mm film AF SLR cameras are quite complicated with all these tiny nobs and dials that have nothing to do with firing the shutter! I've never had any patience to figure out what each setting really does, so I've never owned one.

  8. #28

    Join Date
    May 2006
    Location
    Aurora, IL
    Shooter
    35mm
    Posts
    1,968
    It's many times easier to use manual focus. With AF I have to point the focus point to what I want to focus on, lock focus then recompose. It's a 2 step process plus it's a bit less accurate if you turn the camera after focus is locked. I can focus anywhere on the focusing screen when I do manual focus.

  9. #29

    Join Date
    Nov 2004
    Location
    Naestved, DK
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    2,337
    Quote Originally Posted by firecracker View Post
    The newer 35mm film AF SLR cameras are quite complicated with all these tiny nobs and dials that have nothing to do with firing the shutter! I've never had any patience to figure out what each setting really does, so I've never owned one.
    Not neccesary true. Pentax MZ5 is very basic and "oldfasioned" in handling and The Nikons I own are... yes ok... more complicated than a FE but not so much that you have to read the manual to start shooting. The basics are still straightforward. You can easily set it to M and MF and shoot away. The Canon T90 was as complicated if not more and that was a manual focus. There are lots of modes and gimmicks that I never use but I still find the ergonomics, handling, balance and viewfinder of my F100 or F90X better than the FE2. Zooms in generel lacks the DOF scale but all my AF lenses has one. It might be better on AIS lenses than on AFD lenses but still it comes down to routine and knowledge to get it right. Offcource AF fails sometimes but so does MF, at least for me but then again my eyes are not those of a falcon.
    I wouldn't dismiss either AF or MF both have their forces.
    Cheers Søren
    Send from my Electronic Data Management Device using TWOFingerTexting

    Technology distinquishable from magic is insufficiently developed

    Søren Nielsen
    Denmark

  10. #30
    copake_ham's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2006
    Location
    NYC or Copake or Tucson
    Shooter
    35mm
    Posts
    4,092
    Images
    56
    Quote Originally Posted by Bentley Boyd View Post
    Since my main interest is portrait photography, and I always focus on the nearest eye of the sitter, I would personally find autofocus about as useful as an ashtray on a motor bike.
    But with matrix AF, you could frame the eye in the chosen matrix point on the focusing screen and it would perfectly focus on that point.



 

APUG PARTNERS EQUALLY FUNDING OUR COMMUNITY:



Contact Us  |  Support Us!  |  Advertise  |  Site Terms  |  Archive  —   Search  |  Mobile Device Access  |  RSS  |  Facebook  |  Linkedin