Switch to English Language Passer en langue française Omschakelen naar Nederlandse Taal Wechseln Sie zu deutschen Sprache Passa alla lingua italiana
Members: 68,682   Posts: 1,482,236   Online: 1092
      
Page 9 of 9 FirstFirst ... 3456789
Results 81 to 87 of 87
  1. #81

    Join Date
    Nov 2004
    Location
    Italia
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    4,680
    Quote Originally Posted by copake_ham View Post

    Obviously most professionals have shown a preference for AF over MF in most applications
    Have they?

    How many MF focus 35mm pro cameras have been made lately? Say the last 10 years? If you can't buy a MF pro camera how can you say people have made a choice?

    If pros were so in love with AF why is it so less common in medium format?

  2. #82
    copake_ham's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2006
    Location
    NYC or Copake or Tucson
    Shooter
    35mm
    Posts
    4,092
    Images
    56
    Quote Originally Posted by Nick Zentena View Post
    Have they?

    How many MF focus 35mm pro cameras have been made lately? Say the last 10 years? If you can't buy a MF pro camera how can you say people have made a choice?

    If pros were so in love with AF why is it so less common in medium format?
    Nick,

    The point of my post was to suggest that we avoid dividing ourselves into hard-line factions.

    You chose to parse my post to contrary ends.

    Why?

  3. #83

    Join Date
    May 2006
    Location
    Evanston, IL, USA
    Shooter
    35mm
    Posts
    646
    Images
    17
    Quote Originally Posted by Nick Zentena View Post
    Have they?

    How many MF focus 35mm pro cameras have been made lately? Say the last 10 years? If you can't buy a MF pro camera how can you say people have made a choice?

    If pros were so in love with AF why is it so less common in medium format?
    There not made because they don't feel they would sell. Asn further proof of this, Canon surpased Nikon in the profesional market because they got AF right with a lens based motor in their EOS system.

  4. #84

    Join Date
    Feb 2006
    Location
    Philadelphia
    Shooter
    35mm
    Posts
    104

    Thank you, thank you, thank you

    Thank you to KWMullet for identifying the new location of the Robert Monoghan files. I have missed them sorely.

    Where else would I have learned so much about Century Precision SLR lenses that not only focus manually, but focus with a considerable amount of turning, turning, turning .... Makes me kind of think about where I'm standing and where my subject might show up, and plan accordingly.
    Jeff Polaski
    "A full-time job seriously interferes with photography."

  5. #85
    kwmullet's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2004
    Location
    Denton, TX, US
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    889
    Images
    16
    Quote Originally Posted by polaski View Post
    Thank you to KWMullet for identifying the new location of the Robert Monoghan files. I have missed them sorely.

    Where else would I have learned so much about Century Precision SLR lenses that not only focus manually, but focus with a considerable amount of turning, turning, turning .... Makes me kind of think about where I'm standing and where my subject might show up, and plan accordingly.
    Well, thanks, but it's not so much a new location as it is the location of an Internet archive for web pages that seem to have disappeared for one reason or another. It's like a backup for the web. I always keep a "Wayback" button on my browser's bookmark toolbar. That way, if I encounter a dead link, I might be able to pull up a list of archived copies of that page to choose from.

    With 85 billion web pages archived since 1996, chances are what you're missing might be found there.

    http://www.archive.org/

    -KwM-

  6. #86

    Join Date
    Jul 2005
    Location
    Toronto, ON
    Shooter
    Medium Format
    Posts
    279
    Quote Originally Posted by Nick Zentena View Post
    Have they?

    How many MF focus 35mm pro cameras have been made lately? Say the last 10 years? If you can't buy a MF pro camera how can you say people have made a choice?

    If pros were so in love with AF why is it so less common in medium format?
    I'll note that within the last 10 years at least four pro-level MF bodies have been available.

    The Nikon F3HP was discontinued in 2001, as was the Pentax LX. The Contax RTSIII was also discontinued around then, and the Leica R9 is still available new. All are pro 35mm MF bodies.

    Personally, I suspect that 1/250th flash sync did in the old pro bodies as much as AF did. Certainly in Nikon land, going to an F4 from an earlier F gained you fairly massive improvements in the flash system (Wider ISO range for TTL[against F3], 1.6 stop higher flash sync[2 for an F, 1.6 for F2 and F3], distinctly improved flash metering, standard ISO shoe), not to mention integrated winder/drives (why was there no winder for the F3? only the MD-4 drive that is overkill for most applications, the F2 had the nice, lighter MD-3) and vertical controls. And metering improved as well between the AF pro bodies and the earlier MF pro bodies(spot metering, matrix metering). While later MF bodies got a lot of the improvements that the AF pro bodies did (the R9 and RTSIII are closer in form and capability to an F4 or EOS 1 than a F3 or New F1) they were never mirrored in the more popular systems.

    As to medium format, I'll note that the three most common systems today (sold new) are all AF or AF capable 645 systems (Hassy H series, Mamiya 645 AF, Pentax 645). AF 645 systems have come to dominate the MF market, at least for new sales (used is dominated by the older 6x6 and 6x7 systems that are difficult to impossible to get new these days, aloong with dirt cheap older manual 645 kit)

  7. #87
    snegron's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2005
    Location
    Hot, Muggy, Florida
    Shooter
    35mm
    Posts
    784
    Quote Originally Posted by mawz View Post
    I'll note that within the last 10 years at least four pro-level MF bodies have been available.

    The Nikon F3HP was discontinued in 2001, as was the Pentax LX. The Contax RTSIII was also discontinued around then, and the Leica R9 is still available new. All are pro 35mm MF bodies.

    Personally, I suspect that 1/250th flash sync did in the old pro bodies as much as AF did. Certainly in Nikon land, going to an F4 from an earlier F gained you fairly massive improvements in the flash system (Wider ISO range for TTL[against F3], 1.6 stop higher flash sync[2 for an F, 1.6 for F2 and F3], distinctly improved flash metering, standard ISO shoe), not to mention integrated winder/drives (why was there no winder for the F3? only the MD-4 drive that is overkill for most applications, the F2 had the nice, lighter MD-3) and vertical controls. And metering improved as well between the AF pro bodies and the earlier MF pro bodies(spot metering, matrix metering). While later MF bodies got a lot of the improvements that the AF pro bodies did (the R9 and RTSIII are closer in form and capability to an F4 or EOS 1 than a F3 or New F1) they were never mirrored in the more popular systems.

    As to medium format, I'll note that the three most common systems today (sold new) are all AF or AF capable 645 systems (Hassy H series, Mamiya 645 AF, Pentax 645). AF 645 systems have come to dominate the MF market, at least for new sales (used is dominated by the older 6x6 and 6x7 systems that are difficult to impossible to get new these days, aloong with dirt cheap older manual 645 kit)
    Let's not forget to mention the Leica M series stillbeing produced today. They even made the M8, but as far as I know, the lenses are all manual focus.

    Also, the Mamiya RB67 and RZ67 are still available new. Neither of them are autofocus.

    There have been very good AF cameras, like the Nikon F5, F6, F100, and several Canon models as well. What probably "did in" the old pro bodies was the research and new approach of the companies toward the development of the highly profitable pixy cameras. The new generation of consumers leans toward total automation. Why go through all the trouble of turning a nob with two fingers when your camera can do it for you? A sign of this was when canon produced theirf irst eyefocus SLR's where your eyeball was in control of the focus (the Elan series).

    The new thought process was "look what my camera can do" instead of "look what I can do with my camera."

    Hence, autofocus. Also, the profit on newer autofocus lenses and cameras is substantialy higher than with manual focus lenses. Older pro manual focus cameras and lenses were more labor intensive and the costs of metals has gone up. It is cheaper to make circuit boards than it is to make metal gears.

Page 9 of 9 FirstFirst ... 3456789


 

APUG PARTNERS EQUALLY FUNDING OUR COMMUNITY:



Contact Us  |  Support Us!  |  Advertise  |  Site Terms  |  Archive  —   Search  |  Mobile Device Access  |  RSS  |  Facebook  |  Linkedin