Switch to English Language Passer en langue française Omschakelen naar Nederlandse Taal Wechseln Sie zu deutschen Sprache Passa alla lingua italiana
Members: 70,550   Posts: 1,544,757   Online: 969
      
Page 3 of 8 FirstFirst 12345678 LastLast
Results 21 to 30 of 72
  1. #21

    Join Date
    Mar 2006
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    861
    It is a good skill to know what to do when your exposure meter fails. Of course, if that meter is in a camera with an electronic shutter, then you just don't take any shots. Sunrise, sunset, or any fast changing lighting conditions are tougher. When I was doing nightclub photography on transparency films, I metered several areas representing different conditions. Once while on one of these assignments, another photographer found his battery to be dead, though it happened to be an exact match to the battery in my Nikon FM. So I gave him the battery in my FM, and just remembered to alter the shutter speed as needed for the various conditions; the entire two rolls were accurately exposed.

    Repeat any similar lighting situation often enough, and you will probably remember the usual settings. While it can be tougher indoors, or at night, it is still possible with enough practice. Daytime imaging is much simpler.

    Try walking around with an old folding camera sometime, and use transparency film. As long as your shutter is close, and the aperture markings are reasonably accurate, most of your shots should result in usable images.

    Another handy item is the Kodak Pocket Guide. This has a moveable paper guide wheel that you can set to find aperture and shutter settings by matching ISO and the type of lighting. Something as simple as this could get you within 1/2 a stop.

    Ciao!

    Gordon Moat
    A G Studio

  2. #22
    Michel Hardy-Vallée's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2005
    Location
    Montréal (QC)
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    4,351
    Images
    132
    I sometimes use the Exposure-Mat, a great little sliding rule guide in the line of the Ilford or Kodak ones:
    http://expomat.tripod.com/

    Now THAT'S analog!
    Using film since before it was hip.


    "One of the most singular characters of the hyposulphites, is the property their solutions possess of dissolving muriate of silver and retaining it in considerable quantity in permanent solution" — Sir John Frederick William Herschel, "On the Hyposulphurous Acid and its Compounds." The Edinburgh Philosophical Journal, Vol. 1 (8 Jan. 1819): 8-29. p. 11

    My APUG Portfolio

  3. #23

    Join Date
    May 2006
    Location
    Northern Aquitaine
    Shooter
    35mm RF
    Posts
    4,913
    An interesting little experiment, which my wife and I did before dinner (barbecued rock lobster, with a salad of beetroot, walnut and sour cream, accompanied by a bottle of Vouvray, then strawberries and cream and a little peach brandy, after which all bets are off).

    We both guessed the exposure in an environment we had never had occasion to guess before, an open courtyard about 7-9 metres on a side (20-30 feet), surrounded by high walls. The upper part of the courtyard was lit by the setting sun.

    We were both out by more than a stop as compared with an incident reading using a Gossen Profisix (she was closer than I), but we both estimated on the generous side, i.e. overexposure. With black and white, this would have meant slightly reduced sharpness and slightly increased grain, though overexposure generally improves tonality.

    This casual experiment suggests to me that an ability to suggest correct exposures is based almost entirely upon experience, not upon light measurement by the eye -- which ties in perfectly with what everyone else (except jstraw) has said about 'guessing' exposures.

    Cheers,

    R.

  4. #24
    Jim Jones's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2006
    Location
    Rural NW Missouri
    Shooter
    4x5 Format
    Posts
    1,816
    Yousef Karsh said he occasionally used a light meter, but if its reading differed from what his intuition and experience indicated, he ignored the meter. That served well in the fairly consistant environments in which he often worked. As previously mentioned, if one guesses first and then takes a reading, one soon can come close to accurate exposures without a meter. As in Adams' Moonrise, Hernandez photo, the ability to work swiftly and simply is valuable. Blindly relying on a meter also deprives one of powerful creative tools.

  5. #25
    David Brown's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2004
    Location
    near Dallas, TX USA
    Shooter
    Medium Format
    Posts
    3,301
    Images
    6
    Quote Originally Posted by jstraw View Post
    1/ISO? like 1/100 for ISO 100, 1/400 for ISO 400?
    Yes.

  6. #26
    MattKing's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2005
    Location
    Delta, British Columbia, Canada
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    12,391
    Images
    60
    I expect that the ability to estimate correct exposure is associated with the ability to judge whether or not the light available will result in an interesting photograph.

    IMHO the best way to tell if someone is (or is going to be) a good photographer, is to determine how observant they are about light (and of course, shadows).

    My very first new 35mm camera was a Retina S1. Although it was otherwise a sad end to the Retina line, it had one intriguing function - it had the sunny 16/kodak exposure guide built into the aperature setting ring.

    Actually, it had another interesting function - it featured both a hotshoe for electronic flash, and a flashcube socket. Boy those flashcubes could put out a lot of light.

    Matt

  7. #27
    Michel Hardy-Vallée's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2005
    Location
    Montréal (QC)
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    4,351
    Images
    132
    When you look at disposable cameras, it might seem to be a miracle that they ever give correct exposure: one aperture, one shutter speed. But just like the stopped clock, it's always correct at least twice a day. If you're in the proper conditions, they can give near-perfect exposure.
    Using film since before it was hip.


    "One of the most singular characters of the hyposulphites, is the property their solutions possess of dissolving muriate of silver and retaining it in considerable quantity in permanent solution" — Sir John Frederick William Herschel, "On the Hyposulphurous Acid and its Compounds." The Edinburgh Philosophical Journal, Vol. 1 (8 Jan. 1819): 8-29. p. 11

    My APUG Portfolio

  8. #28

    Join Date
    Jan 2006
    Location
    U.K.
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    1,355
    You've all just reminded me that when I first got interested in b&W & learnt to print (in my twenties) I was using an Agfa Prontor 11, and didn't have a light meter. It was also complicated by the fact that the focus was stuck on 3 feet.

    I came up with some nice pics then, though. I'd completely forgotten I did that, I'd be lost without some sort of metering now - or think I would be.

    It's true I often used the idea when using the fm2 (which I haven't done for a bit) of getting a base exposure reading & adapting from that if conditions change.

    Makes me think I'll get out the Agfa again, I've still got it. And it's still stuck on 3 feet.

  9. #29
    Jim Noel's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2005
    Shooter
    Large Format
    Posts
    1,846
    Blog Entries
    1
    An interesting little experiment, which my wife and I did before dinner (barbecued rock lobster, with a salad of beetroot, walnut and sour cream, accompanied by a bottle of Vouvray, then strawberries and cream and a little peach brandy, after which all bets are off).

    Roger, if I thought I would get a dinner like that I would make a trip to visit you just to eat!

    I have been photographing the 1930's. I could not afford a light meter until some time in the 1950's. In the beginning I used simple little cardboard exposure calculators from Kodak. From them I learned to judge light conditions and vary exposure based on changes from a normal sunlit scene, as well as front, side or back lighting. I used one film for many years, Super XX, one developer D-76, and developed by inspection.
    When I stopped using these great little calculators I had a great deal of information sored in my personal computer (brain) which I continue to use today. When I do bother to take a meter reading it is always checked with my memory. If there is a significant difference I assume the meter is incorrect. This has enabled me to discover when meters are in need of repair or calibration several times.

    So to answer the question about exposure calculation w/o a meter, it is very simple - EXPERIENCE AND MEMORY
    [FONT=Comic Sans MS]Films NOT Dead - Just getting fixed![/FONT]

  10. #30
    eddym's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2006
    Location
    Puerto Rico
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    1,927
    Images
    26
    Quote Originally Posted by snegron View Post
    I might solve this if I go really retro and get a Leica M3 single stroke. Of course, what would I do if it breaks down? I'm sure I would need a backup body! And so the obssession continues...!
    No, get a double stroke. And don't worry... they don't break down. My 1957 vintage M3 DS is still working perfectly. Yes, it's been CLA'd once... but it's never "broken down"!
    Eddy McDonald
    www.fotoartes.com
    Eschew defenestration!

Page 3 of 8 FirstFirst 12345678 LastLast


 

APUG PARTNERS EQUALLY FUNDING OUR COMMUNITY:



Contact Us  |  Support Us!  |  Advertise  |  Site Terms  |  Archive  —   Search  |  Mobile Device Access  |  RSS  |  Facebook  |  Linkedin