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  1. #21
    roteague's Avatar
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    It is more a matter of personal preference. I prefer newer equipment for the simplicity they can provide. With 35mm, I use a Nikon F5 which I shoot almost exclusively in Aperture priority, Matrix metering mode - I've spent 30+ years with a 35mm, so I pretty well know how to handle the metering aspect. My first love, however, is my 4x5 - all manual, of course. I have no problem going from a fully automatic camera to a fully manual one.
    Robert M. Teague
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    "A man who works with his hands is a laborer; a man who works with his hands and his brain is a craftsman; a man who works with his hands and his brain and his heart is an artist" -- Louis Nizer

  2. #22
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    Quote Originally Posted by PhotoJim View Post
    ...And my 105/2.5 AI is just as delicious on my F5 as it is on a manual body.
    ...how good is that 105/2.5 AI lens? Ive heard good things about the Gauss P.C. version. Is that the one you have?

    Er...sorry to derail the thread...yeah, um a camera with different metering available in manual mode will offer best flexibility.

  3. #23

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    As you've recognized, control is the key--not how up-to-date or ancient the equipment.

    It sounds to me as if you're having difficulty with control of the metering system in the Rebel. Instead of switching systems or buying into a new camera system, why not just buy a handheld exposure meter? You should be able to get a really nice used one for a reasonable price. Get it set up for the correct exposure and use it instead of the camera metering system.

    I'm not familiar with the Rebel Ti but I'm assuming it has manual mode operation. I have a Rebel 2000 which does offer manual operation but it is somewhat non-ergonomic is using in manual mode. The EOS bodies that have the rear control dial are much more user-friendly in operation, IMHO.

    Personally, I have found the Canon meters in evaluative metering mode to be as accurate as any system I've ever used--that includes many years use of in-camera centerweighted and various types of handheld meters. I still carry a handheld meter (and I do wonder why sometimes) but when I take a reading, I inevitably get the same reading as the Canon evaluative metering has shown.

    Concerning FD lenses on EOS bodies, I may be wrong on this but I think it is possible for the older FD Canon lenses to be used on EOS bodies with the loss of some functions. I know the Canon EOS mount is pretty huge and that allows the cameras to use quite a few other brands of lenses with proper adapters.

  4. #24
    TheFlyingCamera's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Lee Shively View Post
    As you've recognized, control is the key--not how up-to-date or ancient the equipment.

    It sounds to me as if you're having difficulty with control of the metering system in the Rebel. Instead of switching systems or buying into a new camera system, why not just buy a handheld exposure meter? You should be able to get a really nice used one for a reasonable price. Get it set up for the correct exposure and use it instead of the camera metering system.

    I'm not familiar with the Rebel Ti but I'm assuming it has manual mode operation. I have a Rebel 2000 which does offer manual operation but it is somewhat non-ergonomic is using in manual mode. The EOS bodies that have the rear control dial are much more user-friendly in operation, IMHO.

    Personally, I have found the Canon meters in evaluative metering mode to be as accurate as any system I've ever used--that includes many years use of in-camera centerweighted and various types of handheld meters. I still carry a handheld meter (and I do wonder why sometimes) but when I take a reading, I inevitably get the same reading as the Canon evaluative metering has shown.

    Concerning FD lenses on EOS bodies, I may be wrong on this but I think it is possible for the older FD Canon lenses to be used on EOS bodies with the loss of some functions. I know the Canon EOS mount is pretty huge and that allows the cameras to use quite a few other brands of lenses with proper adapters.
    Lee- you would lose ALL functions - the old FD bayonet mount is 100% incompatible with the EOS mount, on purpose. You MIGHT be able to get someone like SK Grimes to make you a custom-machined adapter that would force the FD mount lens into stop-down mode, and then you could work with the camera in a manual, aperture-preferred type exposure mode, but I don't know if the EOS body would function properly at that point. Also, any adapter mount would act like a short extension tube, so you'd lose infinity focus. Any lens, regardless of manufacturer, that mounts on an EOS body has an EOS lens mount. There are no Tamron Adaptall mounts for the EOS system. There is no purpose in trying to use FD lenses on an EOS body - just isn't going to happen. This is why a lot of folks left the Canon fold when they introduced the EOS system - it pissed off a lot of folks who had investments in FD glass. The upside for Canon was that they had a lensmount system optimized for autofocus.

  5. #25
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    Lee,

    Indeed it's true that I never really got used to my Rebel Ti's metering systems. But all I can do in this situation is consider my experience. What my experience tells me is that the use of spot metering with a Olympus 2000 gave me consistently better negatives than I was ever able to achieve with the Rebel. Maybe it has to do with the degree of control I want to have on exposure. What I decided to do is to replace my Rebel Ti with an EOS 3. The EOS 3 will provide me with spot metering and is a more solid camera anyway. I'll probably get my hands on the EOS 3 tomorrow! )

  6. #26
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    Quote Originally Posted by TheFlyingCamera View Post
    The upside for Canon was that they had a lensmount system optimized for autofocus.
    Also a mount with a wider flange than any other 35mm system, and even THEN a shorter flange distance (lens to film) than Nikon, Leica R, or Contax -- so you can use any of those mounts on an EOS with an adapter... though not FD lenses, which had been made for the very narrow FD Canon bodies.

    "What Would Zeus Do?"
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  7. #27

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    The list of mounts that can be adapted to EOS bodies is long, but, unfortunately, it doesn't include Pentax K-mount lenses. Which is a shame.

  8. #28
    Edimilson's Avatar
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    That's another reason why I opted to get an EOS 3. I got an M42 to EOS adapter and Takumar lenses I really like.

  9. #29

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    Here's some more information on adapting lenses to the Canon EF mount:
    http://photonotes.org/articles/eos-manual-lenses/

    Here's an FD to EF adapter:
    http://photonotes.org/articles/eos-manual-lenses/

    ...but, as noted by Flying Camera, there are a lot of limitations involved in using this adapter.

    Edimilson, I think you will find the EOS 3 will handle considerably better than the Rebel. Enjoy it!

  10. #30
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    Quote Originally Posted by Edimilson View Post
    <snip> My dilemma is: should I trust my instincts and let go of a "modern" camera like the Rebel Ti and stick to older equipment? <snip> Has anyone here ever been in a situation like this?
    What dilemma? Get both.

    Regards, Art. (You got GAS?)
    Visit my website at www.ArtLiem.com
    or my online portfolios at APUG and ModelMayhem

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