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  1. #1
    marsbars's Avatar
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    Waist level finders?

    I have a waist level finder that came with a F3 that I bought on ebay a few months back. Does anyone have one and actually use it? I have attached it a few times and looked through it and messed around with it and find it to be very aggravating to use. What is the best use for these or are they more a useless piece of gear?
    "There is something about the mystery
    of what is on a roll of film that keeps
    me shooting, none of that digital
    instant gratification for me."

  2. #2
    Curt's Avatar
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    No, not useless, it's just a piece of equipment. When I got my Mamiya 645 that's all I had for years. I used it, got used to it and enjoyed it. I was manual and metering anyway.

    I have the F3hp and don't have a wlf for it. It might be a little too small for me. The high eyepoint view finder for the Nikon F3 is the best thing ever invented. You can see the entire field with eyeglasses. Try to find one if you can. So it's hp for F3 and wlf for Mamiya.

    I do have the meter finder for Mamiya also.

    Good luck,
    Curt
    Everytime I find a film or paper that I like, they discontinue it. - Paul Strand - Aperture monograph on Strand

  3. #3
    AgX
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    I assume their main capacity is just what their English name suggests: gaining a perspective from waist level...

    Further they can be useful when placing the camera flat on the ground, on a wall etc.
    You could also use it with the camera held above your head to obtain greater height. But this depends whether you have got an optic on that finder where you have to bring your eye near to, or a groundglass which you could see from greater distance.

    My SLR has not got interchangeable finders; I use an attachable turnable 90° prism finder instead.
    Last edited by AgX; 05-28-2007 at 10:31 PM. Click to view previous post history. Reason: vocabulary

  4. #4
    marsbars's Avatar
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    I find it difficult to focus accurately with it. It does have magnifier to aid in focusing but one has to get your eye right down on it to use it effectively.
    "There is something about the mystery
    of what is on a roll of film that keeps
    me shooting, none of that digital
    instant gratification for me."

  5. #5

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    I have one for my F4S, though it doesn't get used too often. A few possibilities are low level shooting, or for copy work when the camera is pointed straight down on a stand. Another somewhat useful aspect is the built-in magnifier for getting a more critical focus, though I don't remember whether the F3 had that too.

    The big downside for me on the F4S is that the waist level finder only works with the spot metering. Mostly for me that means I prefer manually metering with my Sekonic, then setting the camera to that.

    The view is reversed left to right. This is something you either get use to, or never like at all. It would be very tough trying to follow motion with this.

    Ciao!

    Gordon Moat
    A G Studio

  6. #6
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    I prefer the WLF for my RB67 to the prism finder that I also have. With medium format my preference is wlf (Yashica A, Yashica C, and RB67).

    Mike

  7. #7
    narsuitus's Avatar
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    I find the waist level finder very useful when I have the camera attached to a copy stand or mounted on a telescope.
    Last edited by narsuitus; 05-29-2007 at 12:07 AM. Click to view previous post history.

  8. #8
    eric's Avatar
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    I've used one on my F2 and 24mm and 35mm lenses. I use it with a little zone focus and off the hip shots.

    The good thing with the F3 and above, is the metering is in the body, not the head.

  9. #9

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    A waist level finder also is useful if you're using your camera to collimate a lens.

  10. #10

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    I get to look at the image with both eyes open when I am using a waist level finder. I have found composing an image this way is more comfortable than having to have one eye closed.

    I actually had an wlf when I had a F3. I got rid of them when I decided to only keep the mechanical Nikon models. I acquired a Mamiya M645 1000s recently and opted for the wlf for the same reason.

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