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  1. #1
    snegron's Avatar
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    Dumb Filter Question.

    If you attatch a new multicoated clear filter to an older lens that has little or no multicoating left on it, will the images appear as if they were taken with a multicoated lens? Will the multicoated filter prevent flare, add a bit more contrast, and saturate colors a bit more than if no filter were used at all?

    Reason I ask is because I ordered an old Nikon 50mm S lens and was thinking about getting a clear protective filter for it. I am assuming that because of its age whatever multicoating it had is long gone by now (it is a Nikon 50mm 1.4 S-C non AI lens). Would a multicoated filter help produce images similar to the ones that were made when the lens was new 30 plus years ago?

  2. #2
    Ole
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    No, it won't.

    A multicoated filter gives less reflections from the filter itself, but all the reflections from the lens will still be there. Plus a fraction of a per cent from the filter - since no coating is perfect.

    Clear filters can only reduce contrast and saturation.
    -- Ole Tjugen, Luddite Elitist
    Norway

  3. #3
    snegron's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Ole View Post
    No, it won't.

    A multicoated filter gives less reflections from the filter itself, but all the reflections from the lens will still be there. Plus a fraction of a per cent from the filter - since no coating is perfect.

    Clear filters can only reduce contrast and saturation.
    So I guess I would probably get more color saturation and probably better looking contrast with a polarizing filter then.

    While on the topic of multicoating, I wonder if the outer surface of the front element of lenses is multicoated as well? I noticed that on new lenses when I wipe the surface of the lens with a soft cloth it looks like a light, colorful, thin layer on the surface appears to smear a bit. If this is the case, does it mean that everytime you wipe the front or rear element of a lens you are removing multicoating surfaces from it?

  4. #4
    Ole
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    The outer surface is also multicoated.

    When you wipe a multicoated surface, it may look as if you smear something away. But what you're (most likely) doing is smearing a thin layer of moisture over the surface, which affects the effective thickness (and thus colour) of the coating. Once the moisture evaporates everything is as it was.

    Sometimes you can be spreading a thin layer of grease too, or removing it. "Gruff" seems to love lenses.

    The coating is not harmed or altered in any way - except some very early "soft" coatings.
    -- Ole Tjugen, Luddite Elitist
    Norway

  5. #5
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    The coating reduces internal reflections from the elements inside the lens. Flare from bright highlights and backlight is the main culprit with an uncoated lens. Try using a lens hood. If you are shooting B&W and developing your own you may want to increase development slightly for more contrast.

    Ken



 

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