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  1. #1
    BradS's Avatar
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    difference between Contax T* and T*MM ???

    So, I'm kinda new to the Contax line of 35mm cameras and lenses. Can somebody please explain the difference between the Contax T* and Contax T*MM lens models? What does the MM mean? Is there any practical difference between the two?

    Thanks in advance.

  2. #2

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    T* denotes Zeiss lens multi-coating. Zeiss T* multicoating is employed on current Zeiss G series and other Zeiss 35mm rangefinder lenses.

    Zeiss T* multi-coating is also employed on the Zeiss Contax 35mm SLR lenses and on the Medium Format Zeiss Hassleblad and Rollei lenses.

    MM refers to the Zeiss Contax MM/AE-Series Lenses (35mm Contax SLR lens mount).

    See: http://www.contaxusa.com/lenses.asp?itemnum=123000

    See:
    Tom Hoskinson
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  3. #3
    naaldvoerder's Avatar
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    Zeiss lenses for Contax are available secondhand in two versions, AE and MM. AE versions are older versions from before Contax bodies did have a Program mode. Later bodies, if I'm correct from the 159 MM onwards do have a Program mode, in which the camera will chose both aperture and shutterspeed. These models also have shutterspeed prioritymode. Optically both AE and MM versions are identical for most if not all lenses. So if you shoot aperturepriority or manually both versions will serve you the same.

    Naaldvoerder

  4. #4
    Andrew Moxom's Avatar
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    Brad, as along term Contax user of both regular and MM lenses. There is a difference between them. Basically, the MM lenses allow you to use the program functions on the newer camera bodies. If you look closely at each mount, the MM version has a little pin that sticks out, while the regular mount does not. The pin actuates a newly positioned switch on the newer bodies for program operation. These older lenses can be 'fudged' to behave like an MM lens though by placing in a piece of plastic or match stick in the camera I've heard of several creative ways that folks have gotten round it!!!. That is all there is to it. All aperture priority, manual, will work with all lenses but the MM versions open up the program functions. Hope this helps?

  5. #5
    hadeer's Avatar
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    As far as I know AE refers to "Auto Exposure" which in this case means that you have to set the aperture manually and that the shutter is automatically closed by the camera. The MM designation means that you have shutter- as well as aperture automation, e.g. with MM lenses you can set the exposure time and the camera sets the aperture.
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  6. #6
    TheFlyingCamera's Avatar
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    MM stands for "Multi-Mode" which means that you can use shutter priority and Program modes. Without said Multi Mode bump, as mentioned before, the body will only work in aperture or manual.

  7. #7
    BradS's Avatar
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    Thanks all. I have a Yashica FX-3 which is strickly manual so, I guess the non-MM lenses will do just fine. -- good to know.

    Thanks again.

    Brad.



 

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