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  1. #11
    keithwms's Avatar
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    Another thing, if you can agree in principle to the advantages of rangefinders, then perhaps you might consider an AF one. For example the contax g2 system which offers interchangeable lenses, or the konica hexar AF which has a fixed 35/2. Superlative optics in a very small and powerful package.
    "Only dead fish follow the stream"

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  2. #12
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    I did something similar about 6 weeks ago, but wanted to keep using the canon L glass I had for my canon digital, I initially went for a 300V, which was ok, and only last week, bought a mint, second hand EOS1N, which feels so much nicer to use. Its a bit chunky though

  3. #13

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    If you want a small all metal constructed SLR the OM 1 or 2 fits bill as does the Pentex ME/ME Super or MX. For full size an Canon F1/ FTB/ or T 70/90 or Nikon FM/FE or Nikkormat. The OM 1 and ME have motor winders and drives if you want or need autoadvance.

  4. #14
    Andy K's Avatar
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    If you can find one there is also the Nikon FM3a.

  5. #15

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    I took plenty of photos in the streets of New York and Brooklyn with my Nikons, an F and F2, without any real problem. The F2 is slightly lighter and quieter. Both give close to 100% viewfinder views. I think you can use just about anything you want, it's up to you to decide how much you want to carry.

  6. #16
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    Quote Originally Posted by Mike Chini View Post
    So, I've been 100% digital for about 2 1/2 years now (Canon 5D). I love it. No complaints. In fact, it continually impresses me except for one thing....street photography. The look of my earliest work blows away anything I can do here in NYC with the 5D (everything is super-contrasty so I always get clipped highlights or shadows - even on cloudy days).

    In the past I had a really great Contax system which I sorely regret selling. It was an RTS II. I miss it! But...I've been considering the Olympus cameras. The early OM's are VERY small (almost Leica small) and so are their lenses. Contax bodies were a bit bulky. Compared to my 5D, the OM-1 and OM-2 are almost 1/2 the size!

    Any suggestions? Rangefinders are out. I could just never get comfortable with them despite their many advantages. I did love the super-sharp images I got with the Zeiss lenses so I'm a bit confused as always!
    You might want to leverage your investment in Canon glass by using the EOS 3. An excellent camera. OM-2s work well too.
    Don Bryant

  7. #17

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    You can't have it all, laddie. If you want something small and light, your best bet is something like the current Canon EOS cameras, T2 or K2, and you can use your Canon lenses - but you won't get anywhere near 97% viewfinder coverage. For that you need an EOS 3 or 1 series.

    Since you mentioned the OM system, you must not be mated to your Canon glass, and that opens up a world of SLR possibilities. The OM cameras will do nicely. So will Canon FD, Minolta MD, Nikon, Pentax, Fujica, Chinon, Ricoh, Sears, Yashica.... whatever. Go to a used camera store. Play with a few. Buy the one you like. No 35mm SLR ever made is any better than any other and they all have great lenses.
    In life you only get one great dog, one great car, and one great woman. Pet the dog. Drive the car. Make love to the woman. Don't mix them up.

  8. #18

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    Thanks everyone.

    Wolfeye-

    I know. There is no perfect camera but there are things I've learned to avoid and things I've learned to seek out. One of them is a 95%+ viewfinder. I'm very careful when I compose my shots and I like to print full-frame. I also want a small, lightweight but durable camera and very sharp, high-quality lenses. That's really it! No autofocus or bells and whistles needed. So far that leaves me with the OM's, Pentax K's, a couple of Nikons (F3, F100) and the Contax series. Canon, unfortunately is all about bells and whistles and even though I shoot Canon, for street photography, I much prefer not to.

  9. #19
    TheFlyingCamera's Avatar
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    To get you back into those wonderful Zeiss optics, I'd look hard at a Contax Aria. I used to shoot a pair of 167MT's, now I have just one RX body, but I've kept my primes for it, which are all excellent. I also have a G1 body with the standard 3-lens kit (28,45,90). I'll put in another vote for the Rollei TLR as an option. If you want to try out TLR shooting without the financial commitment of a Rollei, pick yourself up a nice Graflex 22 (aka Ciroflex). They usually go for $50 or less on That Auction Site.

  10. #20
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    A street photography camera at or near the size of a 5d. Any Eos, any (two ?) 35mm rangefinders. Framing with an RF is easy once you get used to it. Having the ability to shoot and see what you are shooting when the shutter is released is worth the effort to learn. The ability to hand hold in much lower light is also a major advantage and the most important reason for using an RF for street. I own a mamiya 6 it is about the same size and weight as the 5d and I shoot a fair amount of street stuff with reasonable success. If you wish to stay small I'd get a bessa on price. If you wish to challenge yourself I'd look into a Hassy SWC.

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