Switch to English Language Passer en langue française Omschakelen naar Nederlandse Taal Wechseln Sie zu deutschen Sprache Passa alla lingua italiana
Members: 70,536   Posts: 1,544,146   Online: 890
      
Page 2 of 6 FirstFirst 123456 LastLast
Results 11 to 20 of 57
  1. #11
    Jim Jones's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2006
    Location
    Rural NW Missouri
    Shooter
    4x5 Format
    Posts
    1,816
    There are two basic types of 35mm cameras used for serious work: the SLRs mentioned above and the rangefinder. Probably the SLR will be more appropriate for your use. However, when there were few SLRs on the market, I used rangefinder cameras for many years, and still use them when more appropriate. My Leica M2 has served well for 37 years, which makes the initial cost a bargain. Rangefinder cameras are great for shooting quickly, quietly, and and in poor light. Journalists sometimes still make good use of them. SLRs are more versatile. My Nikon gear is about as old, and still performing well enough. In addition to Nikon models others have mentioned, consider the Nikkormat. Batteries for its TTL meter are a problem, but otherwise these basic, but sturdy, cameras are workhorses. I also use the original funky Nikon F with a prism viewfinder instead of the awkward metered finder. These old cameras are less convenient than new equipment, but there is little difference in the images they produce. They were the pro gear of their day. Many affordable new 35mm cameras don't have nearly as durable construction.

    Prices of older quality cameras are low, and vary widely. If you shop carefully now, cameras won't depreciate much while you are getting the experience needed for choosing your ulitmate outfit. If possible, hold the cameras before purchase, operate the controls, and look through the viewfinder. If the camera seems inconvenient to operate, as some people find the Nikkormat, you might be happier with something else. Most quality cameras, intelligently used, will deliver good photographs. How well the photographer can use the camera is the important thing.

  2. #12

    Join Date
    Dec 2004
    Location
    Phoeinx Arizona
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    1,343
    As you are taking both film and digital classes I would pick a camera with lens that can be used on either film or digital bodies. I would take a look at a Nikon N80, Pentex Z50, Canon EOS, or a Minolta, I would avoid Olympus as it's digital system is not compatable with its older 35mm system. All of these camera have manual override, built in motor drive and auto focus. One advantage of the Pentex is that can use auto focus, non auto focus K mount and with an adaptor M42 screw mounts lens.

  3. #13
    airgunr's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2006
    Location
    SE Wisconsin
    Shooter
    35mm
    Posts
    122
    Just to add my 2 cents worth and expand on Paul's comments....

    There have been many excellent suggestions offered here. Definitly ask your teacher for their recommendation.

    That being said, when you purchase a camera you are purchasing not only the body but their whole system and most importantly their lenses.

    I choose the Nikon line as most all of their older and newer lenses work on both 35mm cameras like the FM2n, FE2, FA, etc. and the newer digitals. There are some exceptions but few.

    The reason I say this is that if you do go with a film camera you can then use the lenses you purchase on the newer digitals if you go that route in the future.

    Some cameras, Canon comes to mind, do not have this compatablity from their older models to the new ones. Not to say Canons aren't good, but it is a factor to consider.
    WJS/wi/usa

  4. #14

    Join Date
    Aug 2006
    Shooter
    35mm
    Posts
    174
    Generally speaking, the more manual your camera the more you will have to learn (and more learning is a good thing.) I started with a K1000 and it was good enough for me for ten years before I bought anything else. However, for a photographer just starting out now, I'd recommend a Pentax Spotmatic: it gives a few more creative controls (depth of field check, self-timer), the lenses are cheaper (never mind they take a few seconds longer to put on and take off than the K series (K1000) lenses), and frankly, it's a hell of a lot prettier than any K. Make sure you buy from a reputable dealer, like KEH. It's a pain to get burned on your first camera.

    But do ask your instructor, and enjoy yourself.

  5. #15
    Black Dog's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2003
    Location
    I've been everywhere ooooohhh yeaahhhh still I'm standing tall.
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    2,653
    Pentax K and Nikon FE/FM2 are very sound-also the Pentax MX, which was my first camera aged 11.It's light, compact and simple to use.Used ones are pretty cheap as well.YMMV

    PS- a well known UK photographer (John Blakemore) once said that the Nikkormat represented the peak of camera design
    "He took to writing poetry and visiting the elves: and though many shook their heads and touched their foreheads and said 'Poor old Baggins!' and though few believed any of his tales, he remained very happy till the end of his days, and those were extraordinarily long "- JRR Tolkien, ' The Hobbit '.

  6. #16
    Gay Larson's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2004
    Location
    Oklahoma
    Shooter
    Medium Format
    Posts
    1,209
    Images
    22
    I used Nikon for many years and really loved it. When I decided to buy a digital, I bought a Nikon so I could use the same lenses and it has worked out well. Most Nikon slr's will allow you to use it manually which will be the most helpful with either film or digital shooting. Good luck!
    Prints available in the APUG GAllery
    www.gaylarsonphotography.com

  7. #17

    Join Date
    Aug 2006
    Shooter
    35mm
    Posts
    174
    Basically... any name-brand non-autofocus SLR from the 1960s onward will do, I think is what we're saying. Really, there isn't that much difference between them. Don't spend a fortune: plenty of time for that later. The older cameras are usually cheaper, often better made, and for most purposes just as good, if not better, than newer ones. If you're only buying one lens, make it a 50mm, or else a 35mm, but definitely not a zoom.

  8. #18

    Join Date
    May 2006
    Location
    Aurora, IL
    Shooter
    35mm
    Posts
    1,957
    All of the recommendations so far are good except the one that recommended the Pentax K1000. This camera is way overpriced and often sold used for more that what it's worth new.

  9. #19

    Join Date
    Dec 2004
    Location
    Phoeinx Arizona
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    1,343
    In terms of buying an older (much older) camera such as a Spotmatic or Nikkormat. I would not recommend a student buying a 30 year old camera, buy a recent model that can repaired quickly such as Nikon N 50-90 or
    Pentex Z50, your grade to a certain extent depends on your camera.

  10. #20

    Join Date
    Aug 2006
    Shooter
    35mm RF
    Posts
    218
    If you want to buy new instead of used, I'd suggest the Vivitar V3800N as a modern k-mount SLR. However, be sure to get the version with the 50mm prime lens instead of the zoom lens. The vivitar has double exposure, depth of field preview, and a timer. I have enjoyed using mine. It's a common enough student camera that you can often find it used (Mine was ~$12). On the down side, it has a plastic rather than metal body. Since you are also getting digital, I should point out that either the Vivitar or the K1000 is lens compatible with the Pentax k10D and k100D dslrs which are given good reviews and seem a lot of value for the money compared to Nikon or Canon.

Page 2 of 6 FirstFirst 123456 LastLast


 

APUG PARTNERS EQUALLY FUNDING OUR COMMUNITY:



Contact Us  |  Support Us!  |  Advertise  |  Site Terms  |  Archive  —   Search  |  Mobile Device Access  |  RSS  |  Facebook  |  Linkedin