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  1. #21

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    Quote Originally Posted by David H. Bebbington View Post
    Standard technique since the dawn of (photographic) time has been:
    Breathe in slowly, breathe out slowly, hold your breath for one second (no more, you'll become self-conscious and make things worse) and squeeze the release gently but firmly in a continuous motion (obviously jabbing the release will give camera shake, no matter what else you do).

    Regards,

    David
    Yes - though I don't think of it as holding my breath, but just a hesitation at the bottom of my exhalation.
    Dan

  2. #22
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    Quote Originally Posted by Craig View Post
    You might look into the techniques that competition target shooters (espcially pistol shooters) use, as they have a similar need to hold stready.
    I was just shooting a variety of guns a week ago and there are some differences. I found that with a pistol i did not need to hold it perfectly still.. I only had to pull the trigger at the right time. With a camera and a slow shutter speed you have to keep it steady for the duration of the exposure.

    General tips are to keep one elbow against your body and support the weight of the camera/pistol with that hand. pay attention to your breathing. Relax and do not hold it too tightly.

    General upper body strength helps. A monopod really makes things easy though.

  3. #23
    lee
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    TRIPOD and CABLE RELEASE

    lee\c

  4. #24
    David R Munson's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by lee View Post
    TRIPOD and CABLE RELEASE

    lee\c
    *sigh*

  5. #25

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    Coffee may annoy some people, the first 1/2 can of beer may help some people, lamppost or pillar or wall is a real friend.

    Noel

  6. #26
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    A Kodak book on shooting with available light had advice on developing a steady hand. They suggested that you tape a mirror to your camera aimed a few degrees to the side. Set up a point light source (a flashlight was suggested) in a dimly lit room, and stand, aiming your camera at the light. The spot of light that is reflected onto a nearby wall will show your hand movements, greatly magnified. Practice holding steady until the light doesn't move.

    Don't know if it would work for you, but it's cheaper than simply shooting until you get sharp images.

  7. #27
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    Quote Originally Posted by Bill Mobbs View Post
    Quit drinking whiskey, quit drinking coffee, quit smoking, get enough sleep. Try holding your breath while pressing the shutter release, all come to mind.
    When all this fails, then get the tripod. Then you can take up the bad habits again.

    Best regards,

    Bill
    I imagine the first four would be beneficial - and also qualify you to join a Tibetan monastery.

    As to the last point - I was taught that you shoot on the exhale and that holding one's breath tenses the body and introduces shake....

  8. #28
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    Quote Originally Posted by pentaxuser View Post
    Cut down on American coffee (ground variety). This weekend past, I went to a village scarecrow competition close to where I live. People had built amazing scarecrows outside their houses.Great photo opportunities. The whole village was a kind of "open house" and at one house a genuine Texas lady was serving genuine Texas coffee. Very nice but very strong. I was super alert after one cup, would have defended the Alamo after two and chased the Mexicans back across the Rio Grande after three and been banned from competing in the Tour de France for life!

    If I drank as much coffee as I do tea and I don't do that excessively, I'd be seriously "twitchy".

    pentaxuser
    It's amazing.

    There was a time, not more than a decade ago when Europeans thought our coffee was weak!

    Guess it's the "Starbucks Effect"!

    Oh, and the Dutch emigre Peet who founded Peet's Coffee in San Francisco in the '60's and introduced Americans to strong, rich roasted coffee....

    Sadly, he just died last week.....

    But at a ripe, rich, full bodied old age!

  9. #29
    MattKing's Avatar
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    Steadiness starts from the feet. Make sure you are relaxed and balanced on your feet.

    Find a comfortable position such that your elbows and arms are tucked in close to your body and resting against it when the camera is at your eye.

    Your neck and shoulders need to be relaxed as well.

    The camera needs to rest in your hands - you don't want to be holding on tight.

    Breath in smoothly then start to exhale. When you are half finished exhaling, pause slightly and squeeze the shutter smoothly and somewhat slowly.

    Stay stationary for at least 1 full second after the shutter fires.

    Matt

  10. #30
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    As you aim the camera and breathe, between the heartbeat, the breathing and the natural rhythm of the body swaying, there will be a limit cycle. This is a circular or elliptical pattern that the camera lens will repeatedly swings through. Hold your breathe or let it out, whatever works best for you, and pick the time when the movement in the limit cycle is minimum - that is when to shoot.

    Hunters and snipers use this trick.

    Steve
    Warning!! Handling a Hasselblad can be harmful to your financial well being!

    Nothing beats a great piece of glass!

    I leave the digital work for the urologists and proctologists.

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